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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
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APPENDIX D

Biographical Sketches of Panelists

PANEL 1: MAKING ENGINEERING ETHICS RELEVANT TO STUDENTS AND THEIR FUTURE CAREERS

Moderator

Paul B. Thompson, Michigan State University

Paul B. Thompson holds the W.K. Kellogg Chair in Agricultural, Food and Community Ethics at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. Thompson’s research emphasizes emerging technology with a specific focus on agriculture and food systems. His 2015 book From Field to Fork: Food Ethics for Everyone was published by Oxford University Press and was selected as the North American Society for Social Philosophy’s book of the year. The Agrarian Vision: Sustainability and Environmental Ethics (2010) proposed a new framework for addressing questions of sustainability. Two competing paradigms influence current thinking: “sustainable development” had been crafted in response to growing fears of resource scarcity owing to economic expansion and population growth, An older approach to sustainable agriculture had stressed the integrity of agroecosystems and local institutions, providing a connected biological and social orientation to sustainability. This paradigm is now being promoted by researchers who stress “resilience.” He has been the recipient of two recent contracts from the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) for work on improving undergraduate education on the roles and processes for developing technical standards. Thompson completed his PhD studies in the philosophy of technology at the State University of New York

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×

at Stony Brook in 1980. He is married, has two grown children, and enjoys nature walks and playing the guitar.

Panelists

Erin Cech, University of Michigan

Cech earned her PhD in sociology in 2011 from the University of California, San Diego and undergraduate degrees in electrical engineering and sociology from Montana State University. Her research examines cultural mechanisms of inequality reproduction—specifically, how inequality is reproduced through processes that are not overtly discriminatory or coercive, but rather those that are built into seemingly innocuous cultural beliefs and practices. She investigates this puzzle through three avenues of research. First, she uses quantitative and qualitative approaches to examine inequality in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) professions—specifically, the recruitment and retention of women, LGBT, and underrepresented racial/ethnic minority students and practitioners and the role of professional cultures in this inequality. Second, Cech examines how cultural definitions of “good work” and “good workers” can anchor inequality in the workforce. For example, she examines the role of the “passion principle” in the reproduction of occupational inequalities: how seemingly voluntary and self-expressive career decisions help reproduce processes like occupational sex segregation. Finally, she studies how cultural understandings of the extent and origin of inequality help to uphold unequal social structures.

Jered Dean, Colorado School of Mines

Jered worked for nine years in product development before joining the Mines Faculty. During that time he had the privilege to work on everything from complex weapon systems to children’s toys. His specialties include systems engineering, project management for new product development, design of molded components, and dynamic mechanism design and simulation. Jered is Director of the CECS Engineering Design Program and is passionate about teaching students engineering through project based learning. He received both his BS and MS degrees in engineering from Colorado School of Mines. In addition to leading Senior Design, Jered is the faculty adviser for the Mines SAE Baja team, ARB Club, and CSM Racing Club.

Tara Hoke, ASCE

Tara Hoke is the Deputy General Counsel at ASCE and a member of the Virginia bar. Her responsibilities for ASCE include legal consultation in the areas of employment, tax, corporate, contract, mergers and acquisitions, antitrust, intellectual property, real estate, and construction law.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×

Ms. Hoke oversees ASCE’s professional conduct committee, and writes a monthly column, “A Question of Ethics,” published in Civil Engineering magazine. Tara serves as a Council member for the Committee on Publication Ethics, a nonprofit organization established to provide guidance to journal editors and publishers on publication ethics.

Carla Zoltowski, Purdue University

Carla B. Zoltowski is codirector of the EPICS Program at Purdue University. She holds a BSEE, MSEE, and PhD in Engineering Education, all from Purdue and is responsible for teaching design and developing curriculum and assessment tools for the EPICS program. Carla’s academic and research interests include Human-Centered Design, Ethical Reasoning, Leadership, Service Learning, and Assistive Technology and she oversees the research efforts within EPICS. She is vice chair of ASEE’s Community Engagement in Engineering Education (CEEE) division.

PANEL 2: ENCOURAGING AND SUPPORTING FACULTY IN TEACHING ETHICS

Moderator

Sharon A. Jones, University of Portland

Sharon A. Jones has been dean of the Donald P. Shiley School of Engineering at the University of Portland since 2011. Prior to that she spent nine years at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania, first as a faculty member in the Department of Civil Engineering and chair of the Engineering Studies Program, and then as the director of the Engineering Division. She started her academic career at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Indiana. Jones holds an undergraduate degree from Columbia University, a master’s degree from the University of Florida, and a doctorate degree in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. She also completed a master’s of public administration.

Jones is a licensed professional civil engineer and a board certified environmental engineer. Prior to academia, she worked for a large metropolitan city and a global consulting firm. For several years, she was also the joint owner of a small consulting firm. Her teaching interests include engineering policy, environmental engineering, engineering design, and geographical information systems. Her research interests focus on applying decision-making methods to evaluate sustainability policies with emphases on infrastructure, developing economies, and particular industrial sectors.

Jones has also completed projects related to engineering ethics, diversity in the engineering profession, and opportunities to bridge engineering and the liberal arts. Over a 20-year career she has published over

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×

70 peer-reviewed articles and conference presentations, and has received approximately $3.8 million in external funding as PI, or co-PI. She has served on several national boards in the environmental engineering arena and is actively involved with engineering accreditation issues. She received the Professional Engineers in Higher Education and Sustaining University Program’s Engineering Education Excellence Award in 2007 from the National Society of Professional Engineers, and the Indian Health Service’s Tribal/Urban Recognition Award in 2003. She has also served as a Fulbright Scholar and received two Clare Boothe Luce awards.

Panelists

Jaime Lester, George Mason University

Jaime Lester, associate professor of higher education, George Mason University, holds a PhD and MEd in higher education from the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California. The overarching goal of her research program is to examine organizational change and leadership in higher education. This focus has led to examinations of non-positional leadership and tactics to promote local and institutional change and the role of individual identity in creating equitable workplaces in colleges and universities. Her more recent research on learning analytics and pedagogy in computer science is funded by the National Science Foundation (#1444789) and Google. The aim of this research is to create and promote new data-driven evidence to promote changes in pedagogy, instructional practice, and leadership decision making.

Larry Shuman, University of Pittsburgh

Larry J. Shuman is senior associate dean for academic affairs and Distinguished Service Professor of Industrial Engineering, University of Pittsburgh. His research focuses on improving the engineering educational experience, emphasizing assessment of learning and problem solving abilities, and studying the ethical behavior of engineers and engineering managers. He has led the development of a very successful cooperative engineering education program and an innovative study abroad program. He served as the spring 2002 academic dean for the Semester at Sea Program.

A former senior editor of the Journal of Engineering Education, Shuman is the founding editor of Advances in Engineering Education. He has published widely in the engineering education literature, and is coauthor of Engineering Ethics: Balancing Cost, Schedule and Risk—Lessons Learned from the Space Shuttle (Cambridge University Press). He received his PhD from the Johns Hopkins University in Operations Research and BSEE from the University of Cincinnati.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×

Thomas Litzinger, Pennsylvania State University

Tom Litzinger has been director of the Leonhard Center since July 1997. From 1992 until his appointment as director he was Penn State principal investigator of the Engineering Coalition of Schools for Excellence in Engineering and Leadership (ECSEL). Through his experience with ECSEL, he developed a broad understanding of the changes needed in engineering education and the drivers for change. An award winning teacher and researcher, Litzinger provides leadership on issues related to engineering education in the College. Through ECSEL he was involved not only in the curricular and teaching/learning reform, but also in the faculty and student development programs required to bring about change. Through his applied research for industry, allows him to stay abreast of the skills and knowledge required for students to succeed in the workplace.

Ann Ferren, Association of American Colleges and Universities

Ann S. Ferren has more than 30 years of experience as an academic administrator in a variety of roles including director of general education, dean of faculty, and interim provost at American University in Washington DC, vice president for academic affairs at Radford University, and most recently provost at the American University in Bulgaria. She has served on the Board, participated in many institutes, and written for several AAC&U publications. Her work on academic quality, assessment, and reallocation of resources to support learning and curricular improvement is particularly relevant in the new economic environment of higher education.

PANEL 3: RESPONSES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Moderator

William Kelly, American Society for Engineering Education

William E. Kelly, PhD, PE, retired as director of external affairs at the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) in 2015. At ASEE his responsibilities included the engineering dean’s council, ASEE’s K–12 activities, and ASEE’s ABET activities. Before joining ASEE in September 2007, he was a professor of civil engineering at the Catholic University of America (Washington, DC), where he also served as dean of the school of engineering (1996–2001). While dean, he served on the JETS board and the board of directors for the Washington ACE mentor program. Kelly was on the ABET Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC; 1993–2003) and was chair in 2001–2002. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Committee on Sustainability and has taught sustainability as a practitioner adjunct faculty member at George Mason University. Currently, he chairs a task committee for the American Association of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×

Engineering Societies on global sustainability focused on implementation of the United Nations Sustainability Goals. Kelly received his PhD in civil engineering from the University of Notre Dame and received an engineering honor award from his alma mater in 1999.

Panelists

Elliot Douglas, National Science Foundation

Elliot Douglas is the NSF program director for Engineering Education. He is also associate professor of environmental engineering sciences and Distinguished Teaching Fellow at the University of Florida. He is director of the Engineering Education Collaborative, which brings together faculty interested in all aspects of engineering education, from improving their teaching to conducting education research. His research interests lie at the intersection between education research and engineering education practice. His work aims to understand complex thinking processes and learning in students, and to use this information to design effective teaching practices, and includes research in critical thinking, active learning, and problem-solving. He also conducts work on qualitative methodologies in engineering education research. He has published a textbook, Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering: A Guided Inquiry. He has been involved in faculty development activities since 1998, most recently presenting workshops on active learning through the POGIL Project.

Wenda Bauchspies, National Science Foundation

Wenda Bauchspies is the Program Director for STS/Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM). She coauthored Science, Technology, and Society: A Sociological Approach and has coedited special issues for Cultural Dynamics, Subjectivity, and Social Epistemology. Her interdisciplinary scholarship has been published in journals such as Journal of Asian and African Studies, Science as Culture and Knowledge and Society. She has taught courses on the sociology of science; gender and technology; social theory; and science, technology, and development. Bauchspies has a long and continuing involvement with sociocultural research that addresses the transfer, adoption and development of science and technology.

Norman Fortenberry, American Society for Engineering Education

Norman L. Fortenberry is executive director of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), an international society of individual, institutional, and corporate members founded in 1893. ASEE is committed to furthering education in engineering and engineering technology by promoting global excellence in engineering and engineering technology instruction, research, public service, professional practice, and societal

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×

awareness. Fortenberry was the founding director of the Center for the Advancement of Scholarship on Engineering Education (CASEE) at the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He served in various executive roles at the National Science Foundation (NSF) including as senior advisor to the NSF Assistant Director for Education and Human Resources and as director of the divisions of undergraduate education and human resource development. He has also served as executive director of the National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering and Science (the GEM Consortium) and as a faculty member in the department of mechanical engineering at the Florida A&M University – Florida State University College of Engineering. He was awarded the SB, SM, and ScD degrees (all in mechanical engineering) by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×
Page 34
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×
Page 38
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panelists." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Overcoming Challenges to Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24821.
×
Page 40
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On January 11–12, 2017, the National Academy of Engineering’s Center for Engineering Ethics and Society (CEES) held a workshop designed to help the engineering community identify institutional and cultural challenges to instilling ethics in engineering programs and to develop approaches, programs, strategies, and collaborations to overcome those challenges. The workshop was a follow-on activity to the 2016 CEES report Infusing Ethics into the Development of Engineers: Exemplary Education Activities and Programs. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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