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Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space (2018)

Chapter: Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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F

Committee Member and Panel Biographies

COMMITTEE ON THE DECADAL SURVEY FOR EARTH SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS FROM SPACE

WALEED ABDALATI, Co-Chair, is director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), a joint institute of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the University of Colorado, Boulder (CU Boulder). Dr. Abdalati is also a professor in the CU Boulder Geography Department. Dr. Abdalati’s research focuses on the use of satellites and aircraft to understand how and why Earth’s ice cover, particularly glaciers and ice sheets, is changing and what those changes mean for life on Earth. In 2011 and 2012, while on leave from the university, Dr. Abdalati served as National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) chief scientist, advising the NASA administrator on science programs and strategic planning. Before that Dr. Abdalati directed the Earth Science and Observation Center at CU Boulder, where he led the NASA Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) Science Definition Team during its earliest stages of development. He has worked as a research scientist and branch head at NASA GSFC, managed the agency’s Cryospheric Sciences Program, and spent time in private industry as an aerospace engineer. Dr. Abdalati has won numerous professional awards from the White House, NASA, National Science Foundation (NSF), and others. He has also been involved in several additional National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine activities, including America’s Climate Choices, the Committee on Geoengineering, and the Polar Research Board. Dr. Abdalati earned a B.S. from Syracuse University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from CU Boulder.

WILLIAM B. GAIL, Co-Chair, is co-founder and chief technology officer of Global Weather Corporation, a provider of precision forecasts for weather-sensitive business sectors, and is a past president of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). Dr. Gail was previously a director in the Startup Business Group at Microsoft, vice president of mapping products at Vexcel Corporation, and director of Earth science programs at Ball Aerospace. Dr. Gail received his undergraduate degree in physics and his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University, where his research focused on the physics of Earth’s magnetosphere. During this

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

period he spent a year as a cosmic ray field scientist at the South Pole Station. Dr. Gail is a fellow of the AMS and a lifetime associate of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). He is the co-chair of the National Academies 2017 Earth Sciences Decadal Survey, serves on the National Academies Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, and has participated on many prior National Academies committees, including the 2012 review of the National Weather Service (NWS) and the 2007 Earth sciences and applications from space decadal survey (ESAS 2007). He is a member of the U.S. Commerce Data Advisory Council and serves or has served on a variety of other editorial, corporate, and organizational boards. His book Climate Conundrums: What the Climate Debate Reveals About Us was released in 2014, and his opinion pieces have been published in the New York Times, USA Today, and elsewhere.

STEVEN J. BATTEL is the president of Battel Engineering, Inc. Mr. Battel has 38 years of experience as a consultant, an engineer, and a manager in multiple aerospace and scientific disciplines. His areas of specialization include program management, systems engineering, precision electronics design, scientific instrument design, spacecraft avionics, power systems technology development, technology assessment, and technology costing methods. He is a recognized expert on low-noise instrumentation, space power systems, and space high voltage systems, especially for high-voltage systems intended for operation in the Mars environment. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and a member of the NASA Engineering and Safety Council for both the Power and Avionics teams. He has also served as a Red Team or an Independent Review Team member for more than 70 NASA and NOAA missions, including multiple past and present Earth observing missions. He earned his B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan.

STACEY W. BOLAND is a systems engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and is the project systems engineer for the International Space Station (ISS)-RapidScat and the Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA) Earth Venture Instrument. Previously, Dr. Boland served as the observatory system engineer for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) mission and as a member of the Project Systems Engineering team for the OCO. She is also a cross-disciplinary generalist specializing in Earth mission concept development, mission architecture development for advanced (future) Earth observing mission concepts, and systems engineering. Dr. Boland was awarded the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal in 2009 and 2015. Dr. Boland received her B.S. in physics from the University of Texas, Dallas, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

ROBERT D. BRAUN is a professor and dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science at CU Boulder. Previously, Dr. Braun was the David and Andrew Lewis Professor of Space Technology at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) in the Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering. He has worked extensively in the areas of entry system design, planetary atmospheric flight, and space mission architecture development and has contributed to the design, development, testing, and operation of several space flight systems. In 2010 and 2011 Dr. Braun served as the first NASA chief technologist in more than a decade. In this capacity he was the senior agency executive responsible for technology and innovation policy and programs. Earlier in his career Dr. Braun served on the technical staff of NASA Langley Research Center. He is a member of the NAE, a fellow of the AIAA, the editor-in-chief of the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, and the author or co-author of over 300 technical publications in the fields of planetary exploration, atmospheric entry, multidisciplinary design optimization, and systems engineering. Dr. Braun has a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the Pennsylvania State University, an M.S. in astronautics from George Washington University, and a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

SHUYI S. CHEN is a professor of meteorology at the University of Washington. Previously, Dr. Chen was a professor at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences of the University of Miami. Her research interests include satellite and airborne observations of tropical atmosphere and ocean with a focus on precipitation and air-sea fluxes from weather to subseasonal time scales, development of coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean-land models, and prediction of extreme weather including hurricanes and winter storms and the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Dr. Chen received the NASA Group Achievement Award for tropical cloud systems and processes and is a member of the NASA Ocean Vector Wind and Precipitation Measurement Missions science teams. She was an editor of the AMS journal Weather and Forecasting. Dr. Chen is a fellow of the AMS. She received her Ph.D. in meteorology from Pennsylvania State University.

WILLIAM E. DIETRICH is a professor of Earth and planetary sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Dietrich’s research focuses on the processes that underlie the evolution of landscapes. His research group and collaborators are developing geomorphic transport laws for soil production, weathering and transport, and river and debris flow incision into bedrock. They are exploring the processes that control the sorting of sediment on riverbeds; the transport of sediment in steep, coarse bedded channels; the routing of sediment through river networks; the influence of sediment supply on river morphodynamics; the entrainment of sediment to form debris flows; and the dispersion and deposition of sediment across floodplains. New computational approaches are being tested to predict the size and location of shallow landslides. He is collaborating in an intensive field investigation to identify, quantify, and model the processes that will control the co-evolution of climate, vegetation, and water availability in Northern California forested landscapes. He is part of the Mars Science Laboratory Mission to Mars and is collaborating on related field studies of the soil development and landscape evolution in the hyperarid Atacama Desert in Chile. Dr. Dietrich co-founded the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping. As part of the National Center for Earth-Surface Dynamics, he is co-developing a digital terrain model for predicting salmon populations from digital terrain data. Other collaborative studies are under way to link ecologic and geomorphic processes. Dr. Dietrich is a member of the NAS. He earned his Ph.D. in geology from the University of Washington.

SCOTT C. DONEY is the Joe D. and Helen J. Kington Professor in Environmental Change in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. Previously, Dr. Doney was a senior scientist and department chair at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), and prior to that he was a postdoctoral fellow and then a scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). His science interests span oceanography, climate, and biogeochemistry and applying computational methods (data analysis, numerical modeling, and satellite remote sensing) to understand how the global carbon cycle and ocean ecology respond to natural and human-driven climate change. Dr. Doney was awarded the James B. Macelwane Medal from the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the A. G. Huntsman Award from the Royal Society of Canada. He is an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow, the WHOI W. Van Alan Clark Sr. Chair, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He received a B.A. in chemistry from University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and a Ph.D. in chemical oceanography from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography.

CHRISTOPHER B. FIELD is the founding director of the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution for Science. Dr. Field is also the Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies at Stanford University. His research focuses on climate change, ranging from work on improving climate models, to prospects for renewable energy systems, to community organizations that can minimize the risk of a tragedy of the commons. Dr. Field was co-chair of Working Group II of the Intergovernmental

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), where he led the effort on the IPCC Special Report Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation and the Working Group II contribution to the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. He is a recipient of the Heinz Award, the Max Planck Research Award, the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award, and the Roger Revelle Medal. Dr. Field is a member of the NAS and a fellow of the AAAS, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Ecological Society of America, and the AGU. He received his Ph.D. in biology from Stanford University.

HELEN A. FRICKER holds the John Dove Isaacs Chair and is a professor of geophysics in the Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD. Professor Fricker uses a combination of satellite radar and laser altimetry and other remote-sensing data to understand ice-sheet processes. Professor Fricker is widely recognized for her discovery of active subglacial lakes, and she has shown that these lakes form dynamic hydrologic systems, where one lake can drain into another in a short period of time. She is also known for her innovative research into Antarctic ice-shelf mass budget processes such as iceberg calving and basal melting and freezing. Professor Fricker received her B.Sc., with first-class honors, in mathematics and physics from University College London and her Ph.D. in glaciology from the University of Tasmania. She received the Royal Tasmania Society Doctoral Award for her Ph.D. and the Tinker-Muse Prize for Science and Policy in Antarctica from the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) in 2010, and was elected a fellow of the AGU in 2017. She received the NASA Group Achievement Award for her role in the ICESat Mission Development Team, and was a member of the ICESat Science Team. She is on the ICESat-2 Science Definition Team.

SARAH T. GILLE is a professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, which is part of UCSD. Previously, Dr. Gille was an assistant professor at the University of California, Irvine. She is a physical oceanographer, and her research interests include Southern Ocean processes and diurnal variability. She is a fellow of the AGU and a member of the AMS. She earned a Ph.D. from the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography.

DENNIS L. HARTMANN is professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington. Dr. Hartmann also served as department chair and interim dean of the College of the Environment at the University of Washington. Dr. Hartmann’s research interests include dynamics of the atmosphere, atmosphere-ocean interaction, and climate change. His primary areas of expertise are atmospheric dynamics, radiation and remote sensing, and mathematical and statistical techniques for data analysis. He is a member of the NAS and a fellow of the AMS, the AGU, and the AAAS. He was awarded the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal and the Carl Gustav Rossby Research Medal of the AMS. He served as a coordinating lead author for the Fifth Assessment report The Physical Science Basis of Climate Change for the IPCC, 2014. Dr. Hartmann received his Ph.D. in geophysical fluid dynamics from Princeton University.

DANIEL J. JACOB is the Vasco McCoy Family Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Engineering at Harvard University. Dr. Jacob came to Harvard as a postdoctorate in 1985 and joined the faculty in 1987. Dr. Jacob has been a leader in the development of global three-dimensional (3D) models of atmospheric composition, has served as mission scientist on eight NASA aircraft missions, and is a member of several satellite science teams. He presently leads the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team, the Atmospheric Science Working Group for the NASA Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) satellite mission, and the steering committee for the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Among his professional honors are the Haagen-Smit Prize, the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal, the AGU Macelwane Medal, and the Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering. Dr. Jacob

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

has published over 350 papers and trained over 60 Ph.D. students and postdoctoratess over the course of his career. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering from the Ecole Supérieure de Physique et Chimie de Paris and his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Caltech. He has served on many National Academies committees, including the Committee on a National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling, and chaired the Committee on Radiative Forcing Effects on Climate.

ANTHONY C. JANETOS is the Frederick S. Pardee Professor of Earth and Environment and the director of the Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future at Boston University. Dr. Janetos has previously served as the director of the Joint Global Change Research Institute of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and University of Maryland, as vice president for research at the Heinz Center and World Resources Institute, and as a program manager in NASA and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Dr. Janetos is primarily interested in land cover and land use change, climate impacts, and adaptation to climate change. He is a fellow of the AAAS and the Ecological Society of America. He has an A.B. in biology from Harvard University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in biology from Princeton University.

EVERETTE JOSEPH is the director of the University of Albany, State University of New York (SUNY), Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC). Dr. Joseph is also SUNY Empire Innovations Professor in Atmospheric Sciences. Before coming to the University of Albany, he served as director of the Howard University Program in Atmospheric Sciences (HUPAS), director of the Howard University Beltsville Center for Climate System Observations, and deputy director of the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Science at Howard University. Dr. Joseph has co-led the development of the New York State Mesonet, a $25 million project for development of an early warning system to aid state emergency managers and the public in mitigating the effects of hazardous weather. He has also led an international team of scientists from the United States and Taiwan that was awarded a Program for International Research and Education grant from NSF and the Ministry of Science and Technology in Taiwan to study weather extremes and decision making, and he helped lead the development of a major field observation program with university, government, and industry partners designed to improve the ability of satellites to monitor the atmosphere from space and the skill of atmospheric models to better forecast weather, climate, and air quality. Dr. Joseph received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Albany, SUNY.

JOYCE E. PENNER is the Ralph J. Cicerone Distinguished University Professor of Atmospheric Science and associate chair of the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences at the University of Michigan. Dr. Penner’s research focuses on improving climate models through the addition of interactive chemistry and the description of aerosols and their direct and indirect effects on the radiation balance in climate models. She is also interested in urban, regional, and global tropospheric chemistry and budgets; cloud and aerosol interactions and cloud microphysics; climate and climate change; and model development and interpretation. Dr. Penner has been a member of numerous advisory committees related to atmospheric chemistry, global change, and Earth science, including the United Nations IPCC, and, consequently, a co-winner of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. She was the coordinating lead author for IPCC (2001) Chapter 5 on aerosols and was a lead author for the IPCC (2007) report and a review editor for the IPCC (2014) report. Dr. Penner also serves on the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) Earth science roadmap committee. Dr. Penner received a B.A. in applied mathematics from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard University.

SOROOSH SOROOSHIAN is a distinguished professor at the University of California, Irvine. His area of expertise is hydrometeorology, water resources systems, climate studies, and application of remote sensing

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

to Earth science problems with special focus on the hydrologic cycle and water resources issues of arid and semiarid zones. Previously, Dr. Sorooshian was a Regents Professor at the University of Arizona for 20 years and was the founding director of the $35-million-funded NSF Science and Technology Centers (STC) Sustainability of Semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA). He is a member of the NAS and of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) and the World Academy of Sciences. He has served on numerous advisory committees, including those of ASA, NOAA, DOE, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), NSF, the EPA, and UNESCO. Dr. Sorooshian is a fellow of the AAAS and serves as a member-at-large, Section on Atmospheric and Hydrospheric Sciences; the AGU and serves as a member of the board of directors; the AMS; the International Water Resources Association (IWRA); member of the Joint Scientific Committee (JSC) of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP); past chair of the Science Steering Group (SSG) of Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) of the WCRP; U.S. member of the Hydrology Commission for the World Meteorological Association (WMO); emeritus member of UCAR Board of Trustees and NOAA Science Advisory Board; past president of the AGU Hydrology Section; member of five editorial boards and former editor of AGU Water Resources Research. His numerous honors include the Chinese Academy of Sciences Einstein Professorship, 2014; AGU Robert E. Horton Medalist, 2013; and Eagleson lectureship, Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science (CUAHSI), 2012. He received a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

GRAEME L. STEPHENS is the director of climate sciences at JPL. Dr. Stephens is also a distinguished professor emeritus at Colorado State University (CSU), Fort Collins, after spending 26 years there and serving as director of a NOAA cooperative center at CSU. As director of climate sciences, Dr. Stephens focuses on finding better ways to exploit existing Earth observation data and to marry this better with Earth system models. This has led to a development of modeling partnerships between JPL and major Earth system model groups. Dr. Stephens currently serves as co-chair of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Science Steering Group (GEWEX SSG), a panel that oversees the water cycle science activities of the WCRP. His areas of research include research on interactions between solar and infrared radiation and the terrestrial atmosphere, and in use of remote sensing for understanding of the energy budget of Earth and how it relates to the planet’s hydrological cycle. Awards and recognition include the AMS Houghton and Jule Charney Awards, the IAMAS IRC Gold Medal for career contributions to radiation sciences, the Jule Charney Lecturer at the AGU and recipient of the NASA Rotary Stellar Award, and the NASA Exceptional Public Service Medal and also election to the NAE. Dr. Stephens is a fellow of AMS and AGU and the AAAS. He earned his Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Melbourne.

BYRON D. TAPLEY is research professor in aerospace engineering at the University of Texas, Austin. Dr. Tapley previously held the Clare Cockrell Williams Centennial Chair in engineering and was director of the Center for Space Research. His research interests include orbit mechanics, precision orbit determination, nonlinear parameter estimation, satellite data analysis, and the uses of methods from these areas to study the Earth and planetary system. Currently, Dr. Tapley is the mission principal investigator (PI) for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission, which is the first NASA ESSP mission. A recent focus of his research has been directed to applying the GRACE measurements to determine accurate models for Earth’s gravity field and using these measurements for studies of climate-driven mass exchange between Earth’s dynamic system components. He is a member of the NAE and a fellow member of the AIAA, the AGU, and the AAAS. Among the awards he has received are the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement, the NASA Exceptional Public Service Medal, the AAS Brouwer Award, the AIAA Mechanics and Control of Flight Award, and the AGU Charles A. Whitten Medal. Dr. Tapley has been a PI for nine NASA and international missions. He is a registered professional engineer in the State of Texas. He earned a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

Ph.D. in engineering mechanics, an M.S. in engineering mechanics, and a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Texas, Austin.

W. STANLEY WILSON retired as senior scientist with NOAA/National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS) in 2011 after managing ocean programs for four decades, first at the Office of Naval Research, then at NASA headquarters, and finally at NOAA. At NASA Dr. Wilson initiated the French partnership to implement the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/Poseidon in 1992; its global sea-level record continues today with the Jason series. Working through the former Joint Oceanographic Institutions, he led development of “Oceanography from Space: A Research Strategy for the Decade 1985-1995,” which was fully realized with the launch of GRACE in 2002. As NOAA deputy chief scientist he organized a dozen-country coalition in support of Argo, the 3000+ profiling floats now routinely monitoring the upper ocean globally. At NESDIS he led the advocacy for Jason-3 and Jason-CS. Dr. Wilson received the AGU Ocean Sciences Award in 1984 for his central role in the establishment of ocean remote sensing as a proven technology in ocean sciences. His other awards include the U.S. Navy Superior Civilian Service Award, NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, Compass Distinguished Achievement Award, Remote Sensing Society Award, French Space Agency Medal, two NASA Group Achievement Awards, Department of Commerce Gold Medal Group Award, Oceanology International Lifetime Achievement Award, and fellow of the Oceanography Society. Dr. Wilson received a Ph.D. in physical oceanography from Johns Hopkins University in 1972.

PANEL ON GLOBAL HYDROLOGICAL CYCLES AND WATER RESOURCES

ANA P. BARROS, Co-Chair, is the James L. Meriam Professor of civil and environmental engineering in the Edmund T. Pratt Jr. School of Engineering at Duke University. Dr. Barros’s primary research interests include hydrology, hydrometeorology, and environmental physics, with a focus on water-cycle processes in the coupled land-atmosphere-biosphere system. Before joining Duke University, Dr. Barros was on the engineering faculty at Pennsylvania State University and Harvard University. She is a fellow of the AGU and a fellow of the AMS. She was also a member of the U.S. National Committee for the International Hydrology Program of UNESCO. Dr. Barros served on the National Academies Space Studies Board, and on several committees of the Water Science and Technology Board and the Board of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, including the Climate Research Committee. She received her Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Washington.

JEFF DOZIER, Co-Chair, is a distinguished professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Dozier founded the Bren School and served as its first dean for six years. His research interests are in the fields of snow hydrology, Earth system science, remote sensing, and information systems. He has led interdisciplinary studies in two areas: one addresses hydrologic science, environmental engineering, and social science in the water environment; the other involves the integration of environmental science and remote sensing with computer science and technology. He was a PI on the Landsat-4 and -5 programs, when the satellites carrying the first Landsat Thematic Mapper instruments were launched. He served as the senior project scientist for NASA’s Earth Observing System (EOS) when the configuration for the system was established. Dr. Dozier is a fellow of the AGU and the AAAS, an honorary professor of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, a recipient of both the NASA/Department of the Interior William T. Pecora Award and the NASA Public Service Medal, the winner of the Jim Gray Award from Microsoft for his achievements in data-intensive science, and the John Nye Lecturer for AGU. He also helped Disney Animation Studios on the film Frozen, which won the 2014

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

Oscar for Best Animated Feature. He has previously served on 13 National Academies committees, most recently the Planning Committee on Training Students to Extract Value from Big Data: A Workshop; the Committee on the Implementation of a Sustained Land Imaging Program, as chair; and the Committee on Indicators for Understanding Global Climate Change. He received a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Michigan in 1973.

NEWSHA AJAMI is a director of Urban Water Policy at Stanford University. Dr. Ajami is a hydrologist specializing in sustainable water resource management, flood and water supply forecasting, and advancing uncertainty assessment techniques impacting hydrological predictions. Her research throughout the years has been interdisciplinary and impact driven, focusing on the improvement of the science-policy-stakeholder interface by incorporating social and economic measures, and through relevant and effective communication. Dr. Ajami has published many highly cited peer-reviewed papers in predominant journals and was the recipient of 2010 William R. Gianelli Water Leaders scholarship, 2005 NSF funding for AMS Science and Policy Colloquium, and ICSC-World Laboratory Hydrologic Science and Water Resources Fellowship from 2000-2003. She received her Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from University of California, Irvine.

JOHN D. BOLTEN is a physical research scientist at the NASA GSFC Hydrological Sciences Lab. Dr. Bolten also serves as the associate program manager of Water Resources for the NASA Applied Sciences Program. He has served as the NASA GRACE Mission Applications deputy representative for Water and Coastal Resources; chair of the AGU Hydrology Remote Sensing Technical Committee; and co-lead on the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS), Flood Disaster Pilot Risk Management; and is an active Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) Applications Working Group and Calibration and Validation Working Group member. Previously, Dr. Bolten served as a research physical scientist at the USDA Hydrology and Remote Sensing Lab. His research focuses on the application of satellite-based remote sensing and land-surface hydrological modeling for improved ecological and water resource management. He received a Ph.D. in geology with an emphasis on hydrology and remote sensing from the University of South Carolina.

DARA ENTEKHABI is the Bacardi and Stockholm Water Foundations Professor at MIT in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering with a joint appointment in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. His research interests are coupled surface, subsurface, and atmospheric hydrologic systems and terrestrial remote sensing. Dr. Entekhabi has served on the National Academies Committee on Hydrologic Science, the Water Science and Technology Board, and the Committee to Assess the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service Initiative program. He also served on the Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future. He is a fellow of the AMS, the AGU, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He is a member of the NAE. He received a Ph.D. in civil engineering from MIT in 1990.

GRAHAM E. FOGG is a professor of hydrogeology at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) in the Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources. Dr. Fogg’s research interests include groundwater contaminant transport; groundwater basin characterization and management, geologic and geostatistical characterization of subsurface heterogeneity for improved pollutant transport modeling, numerical modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport, the role of molecular diffusion in contaminant transport and remediation, long-term sustainability of regional groundwater quality, and vulnerability of aquifers to non-point-source groundwater contaminants. He was the 2002 Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer and the 2011 O. E. Meinzer Award winner, both awarded by the Geological Society of America

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

Hydrogeology Division. Dr. Fogg co-developed the graduate program in hydrologic sciences at UC Davis using the 1991 National Research Council report Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences as a reference. Dr. Fogg received his Ph.D. in geology from the University of Texas, Austin. He has previously served on the 2012 National Academies Committee on Challenges and Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences.

EFI FOUFOULA-GEORGIOU is Distinguished Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Henry Samueli School of Engineering, University of California, Irvine. From 1989-2016 Dr. Foufoula-Georgiou was on the faculty at the University of Minnesota as a McKnight Distinguished Professor in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geo-Engineering, the Joseph T. and Rose S. Ling Chair in Environmental Engineering, and a founding fellow of the Institute on the Environment. She has served as director of the NSF STC, National Center for Earth-Surface Dynamics. Her area of research includes hydrology and geomorphology, with special interest in scaling theories, pattern formation, multiscale dynamics, and space-time modeling of precipitation and landforms. Dr. Foufoula-Georgiou is a fellow of the AGU, the AMS, and the AAAS and is an elected member of the European Academy of Sciences. She is the recipient of the Hydrologic Sciences award of AGU, the Dalton Medal of the European Geophysical Union (EGU), the Hydrologic Sciences Medal of AMS, and the Robert E. Horton lecture award of AMS. Dr. Foufoula-Georgiou has served as chair-elect of the board of directors of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, trustee of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), president of the Hydrology section of AGU, and member of national and internationals advisory boards, including the Water Science and Technology Board, Advisory Council for the NSF Geosciences Directorate, NASA Earth Sciences Directorate, and European Union advisory panels. She has served on several National Academies committees, including the Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space, Challenges and Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences, and the Committee on Progress and Priorities of U.S. Weather Research and Research-to-Operations. She received a diploma in civil engineering from the National Technical University of Athens and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Florida.

DAVID C. GOODRICH received a B.S. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1980 and was awarded a Churchill Scholarship for a year of graduate study at Cambridge University. He returned to the University of Wisconsin, Madison, for his M.S. in civil and environmental engineering in 1982, and received a Ph.D. from the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources (HWR) at the University of Arizona in 1990 and was named an adjunct assistant professor with HWR the same year. Dr. Goodrich’s early work experience includes positions with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Wisconsin and Alaska and consulting with Autometric in Washington, DC. Since 1988 he has been employed as a research hydraulic engineer with the Southwest Watershed Research Center of the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Tucson, Arizona. Areas of research during his career have been directed to scaling issues in watershed rainfall-runoff response, identification of dominant hydrologic processes over a range of basin scales, climatic change impacts on semiarid hydrologic response, incorporation of remotely sensed data into hydrologic models, the functioning of semiarid riparian systems, nonmarket valuation of ecosystem services, flash-flood forecasting, and rapid post-fire watershed assessments. Dr. Goodrich co-led the interdisciplinary multiagency Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere (SALSA) Research Program. He was an executive member of the NSF Sustainability of Semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA) STC and has worked closely since 2000 with elected officials and decision makers in the San Pedro Basin. Dr. Goodrich is a fellow of the AGU and received the Arid Lands Hydraulic Engineering Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) for original contributions in hydraulics and hydrology in arid or semiarid climates. He has not previously served on a National Academies committee.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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TERRI S. HOGUE is department head and professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Colorado School of Mines. Dr. Hogue is also the director of the Center for a Sustainable Water-Energy Education Science and Technology (WE2ST). Her research focuses on urban and ecosystem dynamics, including wildfire impacts, urban water use and stormwater capture, remote sensing of hydrologic parameters, hydrologic response to climate change, and water sustainability related to oil and gas production in the western United States. Prior to her present position, Dr. Hogue was on the faculty at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Hogue was awarded the NSF Early Career Award and was a speaker at a “Hazards on the Hill” Event for the U.S. Senate. Dr. Hogue is a member of the National Academies Board of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and recently served as secretary of the Hydrology Section of the AGU. She received a Ph.D. in hydrology and water resources from the University of Arizona, Tucson.

JEFFREY S. KARGEL is a senior associate research scientist and adjunct professor at the University of Arizona, Tucson, in the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources. Dr. Kargel is involved in several projects related to the natural hazards and response of glaciers to climate change in the Himalaya. This work involves both satellite remote sensing and field-based research, which in recent years has focused on glacier lakes and landslides in Nepal. Dr. Kargel also maintains a strong research activity in planetary science, particular the hydrogeology and glaciology of Mars, and ice processes and low-temperature chemistry of icy moons. Dr. Kargel led the international glacier remote sensing consortium Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS), for which he continues involvement as a core team member after he resigned the role of director. Previously, Dr. Kargel worked at USGS in Flagstaff, Arizona. He earned a Ph.D. in planetary science from the University of Arizona, Tucson.

CHRISTIAN D. KUMMEROW is professor of atmospheric science at CSU, where he also serves as director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA). His research interests include remote sensing, the global water cycle and its uncertainties—how uncertainties relate to physical aspects of the atmosphere, and thus the fundamental processes underlying precipitation and the water cycle. Prior to joining Colorado State, Dr. Kummerow worked at NASA GSFC serving as the project scientist for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and as study scientist for the then-emerging Global Precipitation Mission (GPM). Dr. Kummerow is currently on the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Science Team as well as the team lead for GPM’s passive microwave algorithm team. In addition to CIRA director, he has been a chair and member of the GEWEX Data and Assessments Panel, and serves on the NASA Earth Science Advisory Committee. He was awarded the NASA Goddard Exceptional Achievement Award and Maryland’s Distinguished Young Scientist Award. He received a Ph.D. in atmospheric physics from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Dr. Kummerow has previously served on the National Academies Panel on Water Resources and the Global Hydrologic Cycle.

VENKAT LAKSHMI is a Carolina Trustee Professor at the University of South Carolina in the School of Earth Ocean and Environment. Dr. Lakshmi served as the Cox Visiting Professor of Earth Sciences at Stanford University in 2006-2007 and 2015-2016. His research interests are in the areas of hydrometeorology and hydroclimatology, land-atmospheric-ecological interactions through modeling, and remote sensing. Prior to his current position he worked at NASA GSFC as a research scientist in the Laboratory for the Atmospheres. Dr. Lakshmi has over 70 peer-reviewed articles and 250 presentations. He has served as the thesis advisor for about 20 graduate students. He has served as editor EOS and associate editor of Water Resources Research, Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, and Journal of Geophysical Research. He is currently serving as associate editor of Journal of Hydrology and communications editor of Vadose Zone Journal. He is the founding editor-in-chief of Remote Sensing in Earth System Science (Springer publication). He has served

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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on the board of directors of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrological Sciences, the AGU, and Hydrological Executive Council, and has been the co-chair for the Hydrology Section for the fall meeting. Dr. Lakshmi has served as a member of the executive council for the AGU heads and chairs of geosciences. He received a Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from Princeton University. He has not previously served on a National Academies committee.

EDWIN WELLES is executive director of and a hydrologist at Deltares-USA, a U.S. affiliate of the Dutch national water resources research institute of the same name. At Deltares Dr. Welles has led research and implementation of water resources forecasting techniques in support of flood forecasting, water supply, and reservoir management. His particular focus has been on ensemble methodologies and integrating those methods into systems used for agency operations. In addition he is leading research into coastal resilience planning methods for both water surplus and scarcity with a focus on the methods to assess the long- and short-term economic impacts of proposed hydraulic mitigation strategies. Prior to his current position he was a hydrologist and a branch chief at NWS.

ERIC F. WOOD is the Susan Dod Brown Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Princeton University, where he has taught since 1976. His research area is in hydroclimatology with an emphasis on the modeling and analysis of the global water and energy cycles through land-surface modeling, satellite remote sensing, and data analysis. His foci include the monitoring and forecasting of drought, hydrologic impacts from climate change, and seasonal hydrological forecasting. Dr. Wood is on the editorial board of Hydrological Processes. He is a member of the NAE. He was a member of the Climate Research Committee and the Panel on Climate Change Feedbacks and is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board, Board on Atmospheric Science and Climate’s Global Energy, and Water Cycle Experiment Panel. Dr. Wood received an Sc.D. in civil engineering from MIT.

PANEL ON WEATHER AND AIR QUALITY: MINUTES TO SUBSEASONAL

STEVEN A. ACKERMAN, Co-Chair, is a professor of atmospheric and ocean sciences and director of the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Ackerman also serves as associate vice chancellor for research physical sciences. Dr. Ackerman’s current research focuses on satellite remote sensing and has produced several new methodologies for interpreting satellite observations, which has led to improved understanding of the radiative properties of clouds, a critical factor in weather and climate. He was elected a fellow of the AMS and a fellow of the Wisconsin Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the NASA Exceptional Public Service Medal and the AMS Teaching Excellence Award. He received a Ph.D. in atmospheric science from CSU. Dr. Ackerman has served on the National Academies Committee for Earth Science and Applications from Space and the Committee on a Framework for Analyzing the Needs for Continuity of NASA-Sustained Remote Sensing Observations of Earth from Space.

NANCY L. BAKER, Co-Chair, is a meteorologist and head of the data assimilation section in the Marine Meteorology Division at the Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Baker has more than 30 years of experience with the U.S. Navy in atmospheric data assimilation, observation impact assessment, observation quality control, and numerical weather prediction (NWP). She has expertise in advanced data assimilation methods such as 3D-Var, 4D-Var, and hybrid ensemble/variational 4D-Var, and has had a leading role in the development and transition of those systems to the Navy for operational implementation. Satellite data assimilation has been one of her primary areas for the past 20 years. Dr. Baker currently serves as the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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associate director for the Navy to the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, and previously served as the Navy technical liaison. She led a Navy-sponsored study to assess the dependency on foreign satellites for environmental characterization. She is currently PI for a Navy-sponsored project designed to assess the impact of the upcoming NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System-Earth Venture Mission (CYGNSS [GNSS-R]) mission on tropical NWP and tropical cyclone track, intensity, and structure forecasts. Her dissertation research developed the observation adjoint sensitivity theory, which subsequently led to the groundbreaking development of the Forecast Sensitivity Observation Impact (FSOI) with Dr. Rolf Langland. Dr. Baker earned a Ph.D. in meteorology from the Naval Postgraduate School. She served as a member of the National Academies Committee on the Future of Rainfall Measuring Missions.

PHILIP E. ARDANUY is the chief science officer of INNOVIM. Dr. Ardanuy’s research considers the non-stationary influences of a changing climate on the water security, energy security, and food security aspects of national and economic security—and the implications for observing, data management, and stewardship system architectures and technological maturation. His expertise, developed over 35 years working with NASA and NOAA, spans the development of complex remote sensing flight systems and their cyberinfrastructures, end-user services, and societal applications to support operational Earth observation missions and research priorities. Dr. Ardanuy’s experience covers the environmental information and intelligence value stream—from algorithm theoretical basis and remote sensing; through architecture and systems engineering, data acquisition and product generation, reprocessing and archiving; to modeling, visualization, and decision support delivering environmental intelligence for multiple Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS) societal benefit areas. Previously, Dr. Ardanuy served as chief scientist and Earth science solution architect for Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems, where he led the science team for the design of the advanced Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), now in orbit on Suomi-NPP and JPSS-1. At Raytheon he was honored as Raytheon Engineering Fellow in 2007 and as Raytheon Principal Engineering Fellow in 2010, and received the Raytheon Peer Award in 2004. Dr. Ardanuy was honored as a fellow of the AMS in 2011 and elected to the AMS Council in 2015. He served a 6-year term as a member of the NOAA Environmental Information Services Working Group (EISWG), and currently serves on the NASA Applied Sciences Advisory Committee (ASAC). He previously served on the Applications Panel of ESAS 2007, the midterm update, and numerous National Academies ad hoc study panels. Dr. Ardanuy was elected to the Nimbus-7 Earth Radiation Budget Science Team for on-orbit calibration and characterization leadership in 1985. He earned a Ph.D. in meteorology from Florida State University.

ELIZABETH A. BARNES is an assistant professor at CSU in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences. Dr. Barnes’s research focuses on large-scale atmospheric dynamics, with specific interests including internal climate variability, climate change, climate statistics, eddy-mean flow dynamics, jet-stream variability, tropospheric transport, cross-tropopause exchange, and air quality. She is currently the lead of the NOAA Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections Subseasonal-to-Seasonal (MAPP S2S) Prediction Task Force. Previously, Dr. Barnes was a NOAA Climate and Global Change postdoctoral fellow at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. She is a recipient of the 2014 AGU James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award. She earned a Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the University of Washington.

STANLEY G. BENJAMIN is senior scientist for advanced modeling systems at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. Dr. Benjamin has led projects on the development of advanced regional and global atmospheric prediction models and data assimilation. He led a storm-model-development group awarded the Department of Commerce Gold Medal in 2015. In addition to basic model and assimilation development, he has focused on model applications to global circulation, hydrology, transportation, renewable

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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(wind and solar) energy, severe weather, winter storms, and air quality. Dr. Benjamin earned a Ph.D. in meteorology from Pennsylvania State University.

MARK A. BOURASSA is a professor of meteorology at Florida State University in the Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences. Dr. Bourassa is also the associate director of the Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies. His areas of expertise are remote sensing, air/sea interaction, boundary-layer physics, and the climate observing system. He has been a member of many NASA science teams and NOAA’s team of ocean observations. He has been the team leader for NASA’s Ocean Vector Winds Science Team for the last eight years, during which time this team received the William T. Pecora Award. He has served as co-chair of a U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability Program Panel on high-latitude surface fluxes, and is a recent co-chair of a Global Climate Observing System Panel. Dr. Bourassa earned a Ph.D. in atmospheric science from Purdue University.

BRYAN N. DUNCAN is a research physical scientist at NASA GSFC in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory. Dr. Duncan is the project scientist of NASA’s Aura satellite mission, which has air quality as one of its core science objectives. He has published a number of studies that use satellite data for air quality applications and that show how atmospheric columns (measured by the satellite) relate to quantities that the air quality community knows, such as “nose-level” concentrations. He is a selected member of NASA’s Health and Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (HAQAST), which works to facilitate the use of satellite data by the health and air quality communities. Dr. Duncan was also involved in NASA’s DISCOVER-AQ campaign. In addition to air quality, his research interests include computer modeling of the transport and chemistry of methane and other trace gases. Previously, Dr. Duncan was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University and the Swiss Institute of Technology, and a senior research scientist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He earned a Ph.D. in the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department of the Georgia Tech.

CHARLES E. KOLB is the president and chief executive officer of Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI). He has extensive experience in atmospheric and environmental chemistry, combustion chemistry, and the chemistry and physics of rocket and aircraft exhaust plumes. He has authored or co-authored over 230 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters on these and related topics, including gas-phase and heterogeneous (gas-surface) chemical kinetics, quantitative trace gas spectroscopy, and computer simulations of chemically reacting systems. He initiated ARI’s efforts to develop advanced laser spectroscopy and mass spectrometry sensors for atmospheric trace gases and aerosol particles, which are widely used to measure ambient concentrations and emission/deposition fluxes of atmospheric pollutants. He received the 1997 Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology from the American Chemical Society (ACS). Dr. Kolb has also been elected a fellow of the ACS, the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, the AGU, and the AAAS. He has served as the atmospheric sciences editor of the journal Geophysical Research Letters, and as a member of the editorial advisory boards of the International Journal of Chemical Kinetics and Environmental Science and Technology. He was recognized as a national associate of the National Academies in 2003 and elected a member of the NAE in 2013. He has served on numerous boards and committees of the National Academies, including the boards on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (1990-1993 and 1997-2000) and Chemical Science and Technology (2008-2014), and was chair of the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry (1990-1993) and the Committee on the Significance of International Transport of Air Pollutants (2008-2009). He earned a B.S. in chemistry from MIT and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Princeton University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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YING-HWA KUO is the director of UCAR Community Programs (UCP) at UCAR. UCAR consists of seven community-based programs in education and training, science support services, and data services, including the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology (COSMIC) program. COSMIC is a joint U.S.-Taiwan mission, which demonstrated the use of GPS radio occultation technique in operational weather forecasting, climate monitoring, and space weather prediction. Dr. Kuo led the COSMIC program from its inception. His team is currently working with NOAA, the U.S. Air Force, and Taiwan’s NSPO on the development of the follow-on COSMIC-2 mission, which will be launched in the spring of 2017. His scientific interests include GPS atmospheric remote sensing and its research applications and analysis and prediction of hurricanes, extratropical cyclones, mesoscale convective systems, and heavy rainfall events. Dr. Kuo also serves as the director of the Developmental Testbed Center, which is jointly funded by NOAA, the U.S. Air Force, NCAR, and NSF, with the primary mission to facilitate the transition of research in numerical weather prediction into operations. Previously, Dr. Kuo was the head of the Mesoscale Prediction Group at NCAR, responsible for the development and applications of mesoscale weather prediction models. He is a fellow of the AMS. He earned a Ph.D. in meteorology from Pennsylvania State University. He has previously served on the National Academies Committee on Utilization of Environmental Satellite Data: A Vision for 2010 and Beyond.

W. PAUL MENZEL is a senior scientist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in the Space Science Engineering Center (SSEC). Dr. Menzel’s current research is focused on studying cloud and moisture properties derived from 35 years of High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) data and extending that record with Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) data. Previously, Dr. Menzel was the Verner Suomi Distinguished Professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Wisconsin, Madison; earlier, he served in several roles at NOAA/NESDIS. First, he was the leader of the Advanced Satellite Products Project, where he was responsible for the development, testing, and evaluation of procedures for deriving new atmospheric products from spaceborne observations, and also their transfer from the research laboratory to the operational weather forecaster. Thereafter, he was the chief scientist of the Office of Research and Applications of NOAA/NESDIS, responsible for providing guidance on science issues and initiating major science programs for the office director. Dr. Menzel has been a PI of the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Science Team for over 20 years, where he has had primary responsibility for algorithms to derive cloud-top properties, atmospheric profiles, and column water vapor using infrared bands on MODIS. Dr. Menzel received a Ph.D. in theoretical solid-state physics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

MARIA A. PIRONE is the senior manager of business development for Environmental Solutions at Harris Corporation. At Harris, Ms. Pirone has led business development offering information technology solutions for satellite ground processing, and weather and climate challenges within the federal government and internationally. Her expertise is in information technology that provides useful information from aggregated disparate data to benefit specific markets and individual users. During her 40-year career she has held senior management positions in both the marketing and the technical development of weather and climate products and services. At Weather Services International (WSI; now The Weather Company), Ms. Pirone managed the technical development and later product management of a family of weather radar products based on the first widely used national radar mosaic. She also developed strategic plans for new services, the most memorable included delivering weather in the cockpit for pilot use. Most recently at Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER), she led the commercialization of key research including seasonal forecasts, space weather, and ensembles processed into statistically based, probabilistic forecast products for weather and energy traders. Ms. Pirone received an M.B.A. in finance from Suffolk University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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in Boston. She has previously served as a member of the National Academies Committee on Partnerships in Weather and Climate Services.

ARMISTEAD G. RUSSELL is the Howard T. Tellepsen Chair and Regents’ Professor at the Georgia Tech in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Dr. Russell’s primary research is aimed at better understanding the dynamics of air pollutants at urban and regional scales and assessing their impacts on health and the environment to develop approaches to design strategies to effectively improve air quality. Prior to coming to Georgia Tech he was a professor of mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He is a fellow of the AAAS and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He earned a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Caltech. He has previously served on the National Academies Committee on the Review of the Draft Interagency Report on the Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, the Committee on the Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards, and Open Burn Pit Registry and the Planning Committee for Black Carbon Issues.

JULIE O. THOMAS is a co-PI and program manager for the Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP). Ms. Thomas is also senior advisor (previously executive director) of the Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS). Based at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Ms. Thomas has been focused on real-time data transfers, particularly for physical oceanographic parameters such as waves, winds, and currents. In collaboration with the National Data Buoy Center, CDIP disseminated wave data to NWS and to the general public. Ms. Thomas was involved with early efforts to standardize wave data formats and to develop metadata, quality control, and archive procedures. In this role, with her focus on wave data, she maintained standards for an “end to end” system, collecting and disseminating high-resolution data. Her work promotes the primary operational interface with the scientific user community and technical partners and provides direction for the curation and management of the data holdings. Ms. Thomas is an advocate for the development of ocean observing systems at regional, state, and national levels, promoting interagency collaboration, data interoperability, and data standards. Ms. Thomas earned an M.A. in French literature from San Diego State University.

DUANE E. WALISER is chief scientist of the Earth Science and Technology Directorate at JPL. Dr. Waliser’s principal research interests lie in weather-climate prediction and predictability, with emphasis on the tropics, Earth system processes, and Earth’s water cycle. His recent research focus involves utilizing new and emerging satellite data sets to study weather and climate as well as advance model simulation and forecast capabilities, particularly for long-range weather and short-term climate applications. Previously, he was on the faculty in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. Dr. Waliser is also a visiting associate in the Geological and Planetary Sciences Division at Caltech and an adjunct professor in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Department at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He is presently a member of the WCRP- World Weather Research Program Subseasonal-to-Seasonal (WCRP-WWRP S2S) Steering Group, co-chair of the WCRP Data Advisory Council obs4MIPs Task Team, and previous co-chair of the WCRP-WWRP/The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) Activity, U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Working Group, and WCRP-WWRP MJO Task Team. He has previously served on the National Academies Committee on Assessment of Intraseasonal to Interannual Climate Prediction and Predictability and the Committee on Developing a U.S. Research Agenda to Advance Subseasonal to Seasonal Forecasting.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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XUBIN ZENG is the Agnese N. Haury Chair in Environment, professor of atmospheric sciences, director of the Climate Dynamics and Hydrometeorology Center, and co-chair of the Strategic Planning and Budget Advisory Committee at the University of Arizona. Through over 160 peer-reviewed papers, Dr. Zeng’s research has focused on land-atmosphere-ocean interface processes, weather and climate modeling, hydrometeorology, remote sensing, and nonlinear dynamics. His model parameterizations and global value-added observation-based data sets have been widely used in weather and climate models. Dr. Zeng’s work acts as a bridge linking measurement technology, in situ and satellite data, and modeling communities. He is a fellow of the AMS and served on its council and executive committee. He received the Special Creativity Award from NSF. He is also an Arizona Leadership Institute Fellow and Galileo Circle Fellow. Dr. Zeng earned a Ph.D. in atmospheric science from CSU. He currently co-chairs the international GEWEX Atmospheric System Study Panel. He has previously served on the National Academies Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, co-chaired the Committee on Urban Meteorology: Scoping the Problem, Defining the Needs (A Workshop), and served on two other committees related to weather and big data.

PANEL ON MARINE AND TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

COMPTON J. TUCKER, Co-Chair, is a senior scientist at NASA GSFC. Dr. Tucker’s research interests focus on the terrestrial Earth system through the use of satellite remote sensing and include primary production, land cover mapping, land degradation, food security, tropical deforestation and habitat fragmentation, ecologically coupled disease outbreaks, glacier extent, and geophysical surveys for archaeology. Prior to working at NASA/GSFC, Dr. Tucker worked with the Grassland Biome at CSU, and came to NASA as an NAS postdoctoral fellow. He is also an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland and is a consulting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. He is a fellow of the AGU and the AAAS and has been awarded several medals and honors, including NASA’s Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, the Pecora Award from USGS, the National Air and Space Museum Trophy, the Henry Shaw Medal from the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Galathea Medal from the Royal Danish Geographical Society, the Vega Medal from the Swedish Society of Anthropology and Geography, and most recently received Presidential Rank for Meritorious Senior Professional Service. Tucker received his B.S. in biology, M.S. in forestry, and Ph.D. in forestry, from CSU, was the NASA representative to the U.S. Global Change Research Program from 2005 to 2010, and has prior National Academies experience serving as a member on the Committee on a Framework for Analyzing the Needs for Continuity of NASA-Sustained Remote Sensing Observations of Earth from Space.

JAMES A. YODER, Co-Chair, retired in 2017 from his position as the vice president for academic programs and dean at WHOI, having served in this position since moving to WHOI in 2005. Dr. Yoder was a professor at the Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island (1989-2005), where he conducted research involving satellite and aircraft measurements to study ocean processes, taught graduate courses, and advised M.S. and Ph.D. students. He also served 5 years as associate dean in charge of the graduate program in oceanography and 1.5 years as interim dean of the school. Dr. Yoder has held temporary positions in the federal government, most recently as director of NSF’s Division of Ocean Sciences (2001-2004). During his time at NSF, Dr. Yoder chaired the National Ocean Partnership Program (NOPP) Interagency Working Group (IWG). He has served on many national and international committees and panels. He was a member of the National Academies Decadal Survey of Ocean Sciences (DSOS, 2013-2015); was a former member (2009-2013) of the Ocean Studies Board (OSB); and chaired (2011-2012) the OSB Committee on Assessing Requirements for Sustained Ocean Color Research and Operations. Dr. Yoder currently serves on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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the advisory board for the NOAA-funded Environmental Cooperative Science Center (ECSC) led by Florida A&M University and is a former member and chair of the International Ocean Colour Coordinating Group (IOCCG). IOCCG seeks cooperation among the international space agencies for satellite measurements of ocean color radiometry and its application for understanding regional to global ocean patterns in the productivity of the seas. He was elected a fellow of the Oceanography Society in 2012.

GREGORY P. ASNER is a staff scientist in the Department of Global Ecology of the Carnegie Institution for Science and a professor in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University. Dr. Asner is an ecologist recognized for his work on biospheric processes, land use, and climate change at regional to global scales. Dr. Asner maintains a research program in Earth spectroscopy and laser-based imaging with airborne and orbital remote sensing instrumentation. He has served in numerous national and international posts including the NASA Senior Review Committee, U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Steering Group, U.N. Diversitas Program, NASA-Brazil LBA Steering Committee, and as a senior fellow for the U.S. State Department. He is a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, NASA Early Career and Group Achievement awards, and an Outstanding Contributions Award from the Association of American Geographers. In 2013 Dr. Asner was elected to the NAS. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in engineering from CU Boulder, in 1991, followed by service as an officer in the U.S. Navy. He earned a master’s degree in geography and a doctorate degree in biology from the University of Colorado in 1997.

FRANCISCO CHAVEZ is a biological oceanographer interested in how climate variability and change regulate ocean ecosystems on local and basin scales. Dr. Chavez was born and raised in Peru and has a B.S. from Humboldt State University and a Ph.D. from Duke University. He is a founding member of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), where he has pioneered time series research and the development of new instruments and systems to make this type of research sustainable. Dr. Chavez has authored over 200 peer-reviewed papers, with 10 in Nature and Science. He is past member of the NSF Geosciences Advisory Committee, has been involved in the development of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), is a member of the governing board of the Central and Northern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (CeNCOOS) and the Science Advisory Team for the California Ocean Protection Council. Dr. Chavez is a fellow of the AAAS, honored for distinguished research on the impact of climate variability on oceanic ecosystems and global carbon cycling. Dr. Chavez is also a fellow of the AGU, honored for advancing fundamental knowledge of the physical-biological coupling between Pacific Decadal Oscillations (PDOs), productivity, and fisheries. He was awarded a Doctor Honoris Causa by the Universidad Pedro Ruiz Gallo in Peru in recognition of his distinguished scientific career and for contributing to elevate academic and cultural levels of university communities in particular and society in general. Dr. Chavez is the 2014 recipient of the Ed Ricketts Memorial Award.

INEZ Y. FUNG is a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Fung studies the interactions between climate change and biogeochemical cycles, particularly the processes that maintain and alter the composition of the atmosphere. Her research emphasis is on using atmospheric transport models and coupled carbon-climate models to examine how CO2 sources and sinks are changing. She is also a member of the science team for NASA’s OCO-2. Dr. Fung is a recipient of the AGU Roger Revelle Medal and NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal and appears in a NAS biography series for middle-school readers, Women’s Adventures in Science. She is a fellow of the AMS and the AGU, as well as a member of the NAS, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. She received an S.B. in applied mathematics and a Sc.D. in meteorology from MIT.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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SCOTT GOETZ joined Northern Arizona University as a professor in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems in 2016, and also affiliates with the Center for Ecosystem Science and Society. Formerly, Dr. Goetz was a senior scientist and deputy director of the Woods Hole Research Center. He has conducted remote sensing research for environmental science applications over the past 30 years, having both organized and served on numerous working groups for the IPCC, UN-REDD, U.S. Global Change Research Program, the NAS, as well as NASA and NSF programs on arctic and carbon cycle science, climate change, and terrestrial ecology. Dr. Goetz is the science lead of the NASA Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment and deputy PI of the NASA Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI). He has published over 150 refereed publications, which have been cited over 12,000 times and picked up by a wide range of major news media outlets. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland, and has been awarded a Fulbright Research Scholarship (in Toulouse, France) and received NASA team awards for interdisciplinary science. He is an executive board member of Environmental Research Letters, served for 10 years as an associate editor of Remote Sensing of Environment, and has participated in numerous educational and professional service activities, including graduate student committees at various institutions. Dr. Goetz served as a member of a National Resource Council committee on Opportunities to Use Remote Sensing in Understanding Permafrost and Related Ecological Characteristics (2013) and Frontiers in Understanding Climate Change and Polar Ecosystems (2010).

PATRICK N. HALPIN is an associate professor of marine geospatial ecology and director of the Geospatial Ecology Program at the Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University Marine Laboratory. Dr. Halpin’s research focuses on marine geospatial analysis, ecological applications of geographic information systems and remote sensing, and marine conservation and ecosystem-based management. Dr. Halpin leads the Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab at Duke University and sits on a number of international scientific and conservation program steering committees. Dr. Halpin currently sits on the executive committee for the UNESCO/IOC Ocean Biogeographic Information System, and steering committee for the GEO-BON Marine Working Group 5. He received a Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia.

ERIC HOCHBERG is an associate scientist at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences. Dr. Hochberg’s research interests center on coral reefs. His primary focus is remote sensing for application to ecosystem studies and conservation at local, regional, and global scales. This is the basic goal of NASA’s Earth Venture Suborbital-2 mission, Coral Reef Airborne Laboratory (CORAL), of which Dr. Hochberg is the PI. Dr. Hochberg is also interested in bridging our understanding of organism-, community-, and ecosystem-scale biogeochemical responses to stressors, especially those related to climate change. Prior to moving to Bermuda Dr. Hochberg was on the faculty of the National Coral Reef Institute at Nova Southeastern University. Before that he served on the research faculty at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology. He earned a Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Hawaii.

CHRISTIAN J. JOHANNSEN is a professor emeritus of agronomy and director emeritus of the Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing (LARS), Purdue University. Dr. Johannsen directed the LARS research and academic programs of remote sensing, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and GPS, involving over 35 faculty and 75 graduate students in data acquisition, information processing, and resource applications. His personal research has related to remote sensing, GIS and GPS applications to precision agriculture, soil pattern influences on reflectance, spatial-spectral-temporal resolution impacts, and land degradation. From 1988-1996 he served as director of the Natural Resources Research Institute (renamed Environmental Sciences and Engineering Institute in 1994), which provided the leadership in directing research and educational activities to environmental and natural resources concerns. Dr. Johannsen also directed the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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Purdue Agricultural Data Network (1985-1987) with a staff of 15 people in developing techniques, programs, approaches and training for university research and extension faculty and staff within the School of Agriculture in computer automation of data and information. At the University of Missouri (1972-1985), his extension and research program was recognized for emphasis in soil survey, soil conservation, remote sensing applications, resource database development, strip mine reclamation, and municipal waste utilization using spatial technologies. Between 1998 and 2001 Dr. Johannsen also served on the Space Studies Board of the National Academies.

RAPHAEL M. KUDELA is Lynn Professor of Ocean Health in the Ocean Sciences Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Dr. Kudela has conducted research on aquatic ecology (emphasis on marine systems, but also including land/sea interface and freshwater systems) for nearly two decades. His research focuses on the factors and processes linking phytoplankton productivity to higher trophic levels, including the ecology, mitigation, and prediction of harmful algal bloom events, changes in global productivity and fisheries, and linkages to human use of aquatic systems. His research utilizes the combination of three tools, remotely sensed data from moorings and satellites in combination with biological models; novel bio-optical methods assaying phytoplankton physiology; and the refinement of stable and radio-tracer isotopes. Dr. Kudela currently serves as chair of the Global Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms Program (IOC/SCOR), is co-chair of the U.S. National Harmful Algal Bloom Committee, and is a member of theNSF Ocean Observing Systems Review Committee and UNOLS Scientific Committee for Oceanographic Aircraft Research (SCOAR). He previously served on the NSF Coastal Ocean Processes (CoOP) steering committee. Within the ocean observing framework Dr. Kudela serves on the executive committee for the Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System (CeNCOOS) and is the chair of the California Harmful Algal Bloom Monitoring and Alert Program (Cal-HABMAP). He earned a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Southern California.

GREGORY W. McCARTY is a research soil scientist at the USDA ARS Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland. Dr. McCarty investigates biogeochemical processes affecting transformation of nitrogen and carbon in agricultural crop fields and adjacent ecosystems such as riparian buffer wetlands. He is a recognized authority on assessing the fate of soil carbon in agricultural landscapes. For example, his research involving an experimental agricultural catchment highlighted the important role of soil deposition in wetlands on carbon dynamics within the ecosystem. His detailed study of soil redistribution patterns on Iowa cropland has also documented the importance of erosion on overall carbon storage within agricultural catchments. Dr. McCarty currently leads the Choptank River Watershed Project on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, which is part of the USDA Long-term Agroecosystem Research network. With this project conservation practices are being assessed at the watershed scale by use of a combination remote sensing and modeling. Dr. McCarty has authored over 150 peer-reviewed journal publications, 15 book chapters, 44 proceedings; has mentored 14 graduate students and 4 postdoctoral scientists; and has hosted 5 visiting scientists.

LINDA O. MEARNS is director of the Weather and Climate Impacts Assessment Science Program (WCIASP) and head of the Regional Integrated Sciences Collective (RISC) within the Institute for Mathematics Applied to Geosciences (IMAGe), and senior scientist at NCAR. Dr. Mearns is also co-chair of the North American CORDEX program. She has performed research and published mainly in the areas of climate change scenario formation, quantifying uncertainties, and climate change impacts on agro-ecosystems. She has particularly worked extensively with regional climate models. She served as director of the Institute for the Study of Society and Environment (ISSE) for 3 years ending in 2008 and was director of the North

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program. Dr. Mearns was made a fellow of the AMS in 2006 and received the American Association of Geographers Excellence in Scholarship Award in 2016. She holds a Ph.D. in geography/climatology from UCLA. She has been a member of the National Resource Council Climate Research Committee (CRC) and the National Academies Human Dimensions of Global Change (HDGC) Committee, Panel on Adaptation of the America’s Climate Choices Program, and Panel on Advancing Climate Modeling.

LESLEY E. OTT is a research meteorologist who leads carbon cycle modeling efforts in NASA’s Global Modeling and Assimilation Office. Dr. Ott’s research focuses on understanding carbon flux on a global scale through the combined use of land, ocean, and atmospheric models and satellite observations. She is particularly interested in reconciling bottom-up and top-down flux estimates, improving the characterization of uncertainty in model-based flux estimates, and using models to define requirements for atmospheric composition observations. Dr. Ott is currently a member of NASA’s Carbon Monitoring System and OCO-2 science teams. She was previously a NASA postdoctoral program fellow and assistant state climatologist for the State of Maryland. Dr. Ott received a B.Sc. in physical sciences, an M.Sc. in meteorology, and a Ph.D. in atmospheric and oceanic science, all from the University of Maryland, College Park.

MARY JANE PERRY is a professor emerita at the University of Maine and an affiliate professor of oceanography at the University of Washington. Dr. Perry received a Ph.D. from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1974 and a B.A. from the College of New Rochelle. Dr. Perry is a seagoing oceanographer whose research interests include a variety of direct and inverse methods to determine phytoplankton abundance using optical and remote-sensing techniques. She is particularly interested in using autonomous vehicles for long-term studies of ocean phytoplankton and carbon. Dr. Perry was a rotator for two years in biological oceanography at NSF and served on numerous NSF advisory committees. She co-chaired the Autonomous and Lagrangian Platforms and Sensors (ALPS) workshop and report in 2003. Dr. Perry has prior National Academies experience as a member of the Committee on Oceanography in 2025: A Workshop, as a member of the Committee on Molecular Marine Biology, and as a member of the steering committee for the Sixth Symposium on Tactical Oceanography. She served on the NASA Export Processes in the Ocean from Remote Sensing (EXPORTS) Science Writing and Definition Teams and is a member of the EXPORTS project. She is a fellow of the Oceanography Society.

DAVID A. SIEGEL is an interdisciplinary marine scientist at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Professor Siegel’s research focuses on aquatic ecosystems and their functioning using the tools of an applied physicist—namely, radiative transfer and fluid mechanics. He has worked extensively in marine bio-optics and satellite ocean color remote sensing as well as assessing the roles of ocean circulation from basin to micro-scales in problems ranging from microbial diversity, biogeochemical cycling, kelp spatial population dynamics, and nearshore fisheries management. Professor Siegel received a B.A. in chemistry and a B.S. in engineering sciences from UCSD, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geological sciences from the University of Southern California. In 1989 he was a postdoctoral fellow at WHOI. Since 1990 he has been on the faculty at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and is presently a professor in the Department of Geography, director of the Earth Research Institute, and chair of the Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Marine Science. In 2010-2011 Professor Siegel served on the National Academies Committee on Sustained Satellite Ocean Color Observations and is presently the chair of the Export Processes in the Ocean from Remote Sensing (EXPORTS) Science Definition Team for NASA. Since 2009 he has been a member of the Earth Sciences Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Committee. Professor Siegel is a fellow of both the AGU and the AAAS.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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DAVID L. SKOLE is professor of global change science at Michigan State University (MSU). Dr. Skole has more than 25 years of experience with research on the global carbon cycle and climate change. Dr. Skole leads the Carbon to Markets Program, a project of MSU that focuses on combining value chains from carbon credits in the carbon financial markets and agro-forestry products for small holders in developing countries. He was instrumental in constructing the first numerical carbon accounting model and has been spearheading the integration of satellite-based remote sensing into carbon accounting models. He is now active in the emerging carbon financial markets and REDD+ programs and in applications of his research to carbon sequestration projects in developing countries. Dr. Skole is chair of the NSF Advisory Committee on Environmental Research and Education. He was previously implementation chair of the UN Program on Global Observations of Land Cover, which is coordinating a monitoring program for land use change worldwide. He has a Ph.D. in natural resources from the University of New Hampshire. His past National Academies service includes the Geographical Sciences Committee, the Panel on Earth Science Applications and Societal Needs, the Panel on Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities for Environmental Decision Making, the Committee on Ecological Impacts of Road Density, the Committee for Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan, and the Committee on the Geographic Foundation for Agenda 21.

SUSAN L. USTIN is a distinguished professor of environmental resource science in the Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources at UC Davis and serves as vice chair. Dr. Ustin is the associate director of the John Muir Institute at UC Davis. Dr. Ustin received an honorary doctorate from the University of Zurich in 2010 and in 2017 was elected fellow of the AGU. Dr. Ustin also serves on the scientific advisory committee to Battelle for the National Ecological Observatory Network. She has 35 years’ experience in multidisciplinary research focused on developing applications of remote sensing data, in particular in the use of imaging spectroscopy for quantitative assessment of plant traits and soil properties. She has been a PI and science team member of several NASA sensor programs for Earth observation and has been a member of the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) science team and the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) preparatory mission. Dr. Ustin received a Ph.D. in botany from UC Davis in 1983, in the area of plant physiological ecology, and a B.S. and an M.A. in biological sciences from the California State University, Hayward. She has previously served as a member on four National Academies committees, the Committee on Scientific Accomplishments of Earth Observations from Space, Ecosystems Panel, Committee on Earth Studies, and the Task Group on Assessment of NASA Plans for Post-2000 Earth Observing Missions and the Committee on Assessing Crop Yield.

CARA WILSON is a research scientist with the Environmental Research Division (ERD) of NOAA’s Southwest Fisheries Science Center in Monterey, California, and is the PI of the West Coast node of NOAA’s CoastWatch program, which is housed at ERD. At NOAA Dr. Wilson teaches an annual course aimed at providing scientists who are not regular users of satellite data with the knowledge and tools they need to incorporate satellite data into their research and management projects. Her research interests are in using satellite data to examine biophysical coupling in the surface ocean, with a particular focus on determining the biological and physical causes of the large chlorophyll blooms that often develop in late summer in the oligotrophic Pacific near 30 degrees N. She earned a Ph.D. in oceanography from the Oregon State University, Corvallis. In 2011 she served on the National Research Council Committee on Assessing Requirements for Sustained Ocean Color Research and Operations. Dr. Wilson is also the current chair of the IOCCG.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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PANEL ON CLIMATE VARIABILITY AND CHANGE: SEASONAL TO CENTENNIAL

CAROL ANNE CLAYSON, Co-Chair, is the former director of the Ocean and Climate Change Institute. Dr. Clayson is also a senior scientist in the Department of Physical Oceanography at WHOI. Dr. Clayson has been tenured faculty at Florida State University and Purdue University, and was also the former director of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Institute. Her research covers the areas of air and sea interaction, satellite remote sensing, and ocean modeling. She is the recipient of a NSF CAREER Award and the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award. She received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from President Bill Clinton. Dr. Clayson received a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering sciences from CU Boulder. Previously, Dr. Clayson served as a member of the National Academies Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, including the Committee on the Future of Rainfall Measuring Missions and the Committee to Review the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan.

VENKATACHALAM RAMASWAMY, Co-Chair, is director of NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), and a lecturer with the rank of professor in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program at Princeton University. Dr. Ramaswamy’s primary interests include numerical modeling of the global climate system, advancing the understanding of atmospheric physics and related processes, and investigating the climatic changes due to natural and human-influenced factors. He directs one of the core climate modeling centers in the United States with the mission to develop and apply numerical models for understanding global and regional climate, and conduct research on predictability/predictions and projections of climate. His honors include the following: fellow, AMS, AGU, and AAAS; AMS Houghton and Walter Orr Roberts Lecturer; WMO Norbert-Gerbier International for best scientific paper (three-time recipient); Presidential Rank; and distinguished lecturer, Bert Bolin, Stockholm University, and Joseph Priestley, Chemical Heritage Foundation. Dr. Ramaswamy has been a lead author or review editor on the IPCC WGI Climate Change Science Assessment Reports from 1992 to 2013, and was a member of the IPCC team that was a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. Ramaswamy earned a Ph. D. in atmospheric sciences from the State University of New York, Albany. He has previously served on the National Academies Panel on Informing Effective Decisions and Actions Related to Climate Change as well as the Panel on Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Climate Change.

ARLYN E. ANDREWS is a chemist at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado. Previously, Dr. Andrews worked at NASA GSFC, where she contributed to the initial development of concepts for active and passive CO2 satellite sensors. Dr. Andrews has measured carbon dioxide from the surface to the stratosphere on a variety of airborne platforms, including NASA’s ER-2 aircraft—a modified U-2 spy plane—and high-altitude balloons. She is currently responsible for a network of sites measuring carbon dioxide, methane, and related gases from broadcast towers, and she leads NOAA’s Carbon Tracker-Lagrange regional modeling framework for estimating emissions of carbon dioxide and methane and biological uptake of carbon dioxide by terrestrial ecosystems. Dr. Andrews served as a member of the Carbon Cycle Science Steering Group for the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program. She earned a Ph.D. in Earth and planetary science from Harvard University.

ENRIQUE CURCHITSER is a professor of oceanography and climate in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers University. Dr. Curchitser’s main research interests include ocean circulation and its role in the climate system, dynamics of boundary currents and shelf circulation, physical-biological interactions, development of coupled Earth system models, and multiscale climate dynamics and numerical modeling. His group at Rutgers University, the Earth System Modeling Lab, assembles an interdisciplinary team of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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scientists and students that makes use of numerical models to address a range of climate-related problems. Specific projects include the role of upwelling systems in climate and ecosystem dynamics, downscaling of climate models to coastal systems, and exploring the links between coupled eco- and human-systems and climate. Dr. Curchitser is the State Department-appointed academic delegate to the North Pacific Marine Science organization and chair of the CLIVAR research focus on Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems as well as a member of the Ocean Model Development Panel (OMDP).

LEE-LUENG FU is a senior research scientist at JPL, where he is also a fellow. Dr. Fu has been the project scientist for JPL’s satellite altimetry missions for oceanographic and geodetic studies since 1988, including TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and Jason-2. He is currently the project scientist for the U.S./France joint Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, which is being developed as the next generation altimetry mission for measuring water elevation on Earth. Dr. Fu’s research has been focused on the variability of sea level in relation to ocean circulation and climate. He received a B.S. in physics from National Taiwan University and a Ph.D. in oceanography from MIT and WHOI. He is a member of the NAE and a fellow of the AGU and the AMS. Recently, he was awarded the COSPAR International Cooperation Medal for his leadership in the development and continuation of satellite altimetry missions. He has served on the National Academies Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (through 2016) and the Committee on a Framework for Analyzing the Needs for Continuity of NASA-Sustained Remote Sensing Observations of the Earth from Space (through 2015).

GUIDO GROSSE is a professor of permafrost in the Earth system at the University of Potsdam and the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) in the Periglacial Research Department in the Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Potsdam, Germany. At AWI Dr. Grosse is leading the European Research Council (ERC) Project PETA-CARB, where a broad range of remote sensing observations are coupled with soil carbon stock estimates to better understand carbon pools and dynamics in Arctic permafrost regions. He is also the lead for two work packages in the European Space Agency (ESA) GlobPermafrost project. His research focuses on the study of climate change impacts in Arctic permafrost environments by using high-to medium-resolution remote sensing, geospatial information systems, and extensive field work. Previously, Dr. Grosse was on the faculty of the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where he was PI and co-investigator in multiple NASA, NSF, and Alaska LCC projects focusing on remote sensing of permafrost landscape dynamics and associated ecosystem, hydrological, and biogeochemical processes. He led the Thermokarst Working Group in the Permafrost Carbon Network (PCN) and the working group on Vulnerability of High Latitude Soil Carbon to Disturbance within the North American Carbon Program (NACP). He participated in more than 35 Arctic field campaigns in Siberia and Alaska. He earned a Ph.D. for geology at Alfred Wegener Institute, Potsdam, and the University of Potsdam.

RANDAL D. KOSTER is a research scientist at the NASA GSFC. Dr. Koster’s early work focused on the analysis of global water isotope geochemistry. Most of his tenure at GSFC, however, has been dedicated to two research thrusts: (1) the development of improved treatments of land-surface physics for atmospheric general circulation models, and (2) the analysis of interactions between the land and atmosphere using these models. He has examined many questions regarding land-atmosphere feedback, including the following: Can knowledge of soil moisture conditions at the beginning of a seasonal weather forecast improve the forecast? Can we find evidence in the observational record that variability in land-surface states has an effect on rainfall, air temperature, and other atmospheric variables? Dr. Koster is the 2016 winner of the AMS Hydrological Sciences Medal. He received an Sc.D. from MIT. He served on the National Academies Committee on Assessment of Intraseasonal to Interannual Climate Prediction and Predictability.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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SONIA M. KREIDENWEIS is a university distinguished professor and the associate dean for research at the College of Engineering at CSU. At CSU Dr. Kreidenweis has led the initiation and development of the program in atmospheric chemistry, specializing in her own group in the characterization of aerosol physical and optical properties. Her research interests include the study of aerosol-cloud interactions via observations and modeling; methods for the detection, characterization, and parameterization of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles; and application of aerosol-water interaction concepts to visibility and climate. Dr. Kreidenweis is a recipient of the Sinclair Award of the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR), and is a fellow of the AAAR and of the AMS. She earned a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Caltech. She served as a member of the National Academies Committee on International Transport of Air Pollution, the Committee on Opportunities to Improve the Representation of Clouds and Aerosols in Climate Models with National Collection Systems, and the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry.

EMILIO F. MORAN is John A. Hannah Distinguished Professor at Michigan State University at the Center for Global Change and Earth Observations. Dr. Moran was previously distinguished professor and the James H. Rudy Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University. He is the author of 10 books, 15 edited volumes, and more than 190 journal articles and book chapters. He is formally trained in anthropology, geography, ecology, soil science, and satellite remote sensing. His work for the past 20 years has been focused on linking the social and natural sciences, addressing questions on land use and land cover change, and population and environment. Dr. Moran’s research has been supported by NSF, National Institutes of Health (NIH), NOAA, and NASA. His three latest books, Environmental Social Science (Wiley/Blackwell, 2010), People and Nature (Blackwell, 2006), and Human Adaptability, 3rd ed. (Westview, 2007), address broad issues of human interaction with the environment. He is a past Guggenheim fellow, a fellow of the Linnean Society of London, a fellow of the American Anthropological Association and the Society for Applied Anthropology, a fellow of the AAAS, and a member of the NAS. He earned a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Florida. He served on the National Academies Division Committee for the Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change, and the Geographical Sciences Committee.

CORA E. RANDALL is a professor at the CU Boulder in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, and a faculty member of the CU Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. Dr. Randall’s main area of expertise is remote sensing of Earth’s middle atmosphere, with particular emphasis on the polar regions. She investigates processes related to stratospheric ozone depletion, polar mesospheric clouds, and atmospheric coupling through solar and magnetospheric energetic particle precipitation. She teaches courses in chemistry, climate, radiative transfer, and remote sensing. Dr. Randall is a current or prior member of numerous international satellite science teams, and is PI on the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) experiment on the NASA Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite mission. She has won a number of awards in recognition of her scientific contributions, and is an elected fellow of the AGU and AAAS. She earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She has not previously served on a National Academies committee.

PHILIP J. RASCH is the chief scientist and laboratory fellow at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Prior to working for PNNL Dr. Rasch held several positions throughout NCAR. His main focus has been on understanding the connections between clouds, chemistry, and climate of the Earth system. Work in this broad area has required basic contributions in numerical methods for atmospheric models, as well as contributions in the representation of cloud and aerosol processes, and processes that control the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
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transport, production, and loss of trace constituents in the atmosphere. Dr. Rasch is interested in climate change and the water cycle, as well as the role of aerosols on the climate system. He has also worked and published regularly on the controversial subject of climate engineering (geoengineering). Dr. Rasch was a chair of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Program of the IGBP. He led activities for the WCRP/IGBP Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate activity. He has served in various editorial positions for international journals and served on advisory panels for NSF, Department of Energy (DOE), NASA, and the AMS. Dr. Rasch has been a contributing author to NASA, the WMO, and the IPCC assessment documents. He earned a Ph.D. in meteorology from Florida State University. He has previously served on the National Academies Committee on Geoengineering Climate: Technical Evaluation and Discussion of Impacts, and Committee for Review of CCSP Draft Synthesis and Assessment Product 3.2.

ERIC J. RIGNOT is a professor at the University of California, Irvine, in the Department of Earth System Science. Dr. Rignot is also a senior research scientist and joint faculty appointee at JPL. Dr. Rignot has 26 years of experience in glaciology, polar physical oceanography, ice-ocean interaction, synthetic-aperture radar applications for ice-sheet mass balance, low-frequency radar sounding of glaciers, airborne surveying of Greenland and Antarctica, and numerical ice-sheet modeling. Dr. Rignot has received the following awards: NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, NASA Outstanding Team Leadership, NASA Group Achievement, JPL Director Award, Nobel Peace Prize in 2007, IPCC AR4 Authors, AGU Fellow, and Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher. He is a member of CLIVAR, NSF SEARCH, NASA’s Sea Level Change Team; he is the science lead for the Operation IceBridge mission over land ice and a member of the Science Definition Team for the NASA/Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission. He earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from UCLA. He served as a member of the National Academies Committee on a Framework for Analyzing the Needs for Continuity of NASA-Sustained Remote Sensing Observations of Earth from Space.

CHRISTOPHER RUF is a professor of atmospheric science and electric engineering at the University of Michigan in the Climate and Space Department. Dr. Ruf is a PI for the NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) Earth Venture Mission, which measures ocean surface wind speed in tropical cyclones with rapid sampling using a constellation of eight microsatellites in low Earth orbit. CYGNSS successfully launched in December 2016. Dr. Ruf’s research interests include remote sensing technology and Earth science applications related to climate and weather studies. Previously, Dr. Ruf was on the faculty of the Pennsylvania State University in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and on the technical staff of NASA JPL/Caltech. He earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He served as a member of the National Academies Committee on the Scientific Uses of the Radio Spectrum, Survey Steering Committee for Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future: Weather Panel, and the Committee on Radio Frequencies.

ROSS J. SALAWITCH is a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP), in the Departments of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center. At UMCP Dr. Salawitch leads a research effort focused on stratospheric ozone layer depletion and recovery, air quality, the global carbon cycle, and climate change. All of these efforts involve the use of various computer models and a suite of observations to quantify the effects of human activity on the composition of Earth’s atmosphere. Previously, Dr. Salawitch was on the research staff of JPL, Caltech, and also served at various times as visiting research associate and lecturer

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

at Caltech. He is the recipient of the Yoram Kaufman Award for Unselfish Cooperation in Research from the Atmospheric Sciences Section of the AGU and is a fellow of the AAAS. He earned a Ph.D. in applied physics from Harvard University, for research on the cause of the Antarctic ozone hole. He has not previously served on a National Academies committee.

AMY K. SNOVER serves as the director of the Climate Impacts Group and assistant dean of applied research at the University of Washington in the College of the Environment. Dr. Snover is also affiliate associate professor. She works to improve society’s resilience to natural and human-caused fluctuations in climate by bridging the gap between science and decision making. Working with a broad range of stakeholders, Dr. Snover helps to develop science-based climate change planning and adaptation guidance, identify research priorities, and advise on strategies for building climate resilience. She has been recognized as a White House Champion of Change for Climate Education and Literacy, was a convening lead author for the Third U.S. National Climate Assessment, and was lead author of the groundbreaking 2007 guidebook, Preparing for Climate Change: A Guidebook for Local, Regional, and State Governments, with over 3,000 copies now in use worldwide. Current areas of research include defining successful climate change adaptation, exploring the role of cities in adaptation, and identifying the time of emergence of management-relevant aspects of climate change. Dr. Snover received a Ph.D. in environmental chemistry from the University of Washington.

JULIENNE C. STROEVE is a senior research scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), which is within the CIRES. Dr. Stroeve’s polar research interests have focused on the sea-ice cover and include sea-ice predictability, climate change, and associated local and large-scale impacts, particularly in the Arctic. She has conducted several Arctic field campaigns. Dr. Stroeve’s work has been featured in numerous magazines, news reports, radio shows, and TV documentaries. She has given keynote addresses around the world on polar issues and has briefed former vice president Al Gore. She has published more than 50 articles in peer-reviewed journals and contributed to several national and international reports on Arctic climate change and polar processes. She received a Ph.D. in geography from the CU Boulder for her work in understanding Greenland climate variability. Dr. Stroeve serves on the NSF Geosciences Advisory Committee. She has served on the National Academies Committee for the Antarctic Sea Ice Variability in the Southern Climate-Ocean System Workshop and has served on the Committee on Designing an Arctic Observing Network.

BRUCE A. WIELICKI is a senior scientist for radiation sciences at NASA Langley Research Center. Dr. Wielicki is currently science team lead of NASA’s Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) Pathfinder mission to the International Space Station (ISS), a mission that started in 2016 and is planned for launch in 2020. Dr. Wielicki was a PI on the NASA Cloud-Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments from 1990 through 2008. He has also been a co-investigator on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), CloudSat, Landsat, and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) NASA missions. His research interests are in climate change, climate sensitivity, cloud feedback, Earth’s radiation budget, cloud remote sensing, radiative transfer theory, and testing of climate models. He has published over 110 journal articles with over 5500 citations. Dr. Wielicki has received two Presidential Rank awards and four NASA medals, including the Distinguished Service Medal, which is NASA’s highest award. He is a fellow of the AMS and has received the AMS Houghton Award. He has served on numerous national and international committees. Dr. Wielicki has served on two National Academies study committees: the 2013 Total Solar Irradiance study for NOAA, and the 2015 Continuity of NASA Earth Observations from Space: A Value Framework.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

GARY W. YOHE is the Huffington Foundation Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies at Wesleyan University. Dr. Yohe has been on the faculty at Wesleyan for more than 30 years. He is the author of more than 100 scholarly articles, several books, and many contributions to media coverage of climate issues. Most of his work has focused attention on the mitigation and adaptation/impacts sides of the climate issue. Involved since the early 1990s with the IPCC that received a share of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. Yohe served as a lead author for four chapters in the Third Assessment Report published in 2001 and as convening lead author for the last chapter of the contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report published in 2007. In that assessment he also worked with the Core Writing Team to prepare the overall Synthesis Report. He was a convening lead author for Chapter 18 of the Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report, “Detection and Attribution,” and a lead author for Chapter 1, “Points of Departure.” He received a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University. Most recently, he has served on the National Academies Committee to Advise the U.S. Global Change Research Program, the Board on Environmental Change and Society and the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. Dr. Yohe was also a vice chair of the 2014 National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee for the Obama Administration.

PANEL ON EARTH SURFACE AND INTERIOR: DYNAMICS AND HAZARDS

DOUGLAS W. BURBANK, Co-Chair, is a professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in the Department of Earth Science. Dr. Burbank’s research in tectonic geomorphology synthesizes surface processes, modern and past climate history, sedimentology, stratigraphy, structure, and diverse dating approaches in order to quantify the growth and decay of topography through time. Previously, Dr. Burbank was a professor at the Pennsylvania State University and at the University of Southern California. He has been elected a fellow of the AGU, the AAAS, and the Geological Society of America. Dr. Burbank earned a Ph.D. from Dartmouth College. He is a member of the NAS, but has not previously served on any committees of the National Academies.

DAVID T. SANDWELL, Co-Chair, is professor of geophysics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics. Dr. Sandwell’s research activities are focused on mapping large-scale topographic features beneath the ocean using data collected by remote-sensing instruments on satellites orbiting Earth and sonars on research vessels. Dr. Sandwell worked as a research geodesist at the National Geodetic Survey and as a research geophysicist at the University of Texas, Austin, before taking a faculty position at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He is the president of the AGU Geodesy Section. Dr. Sandwell earned a Ph.D. in geophysics and space physics from the University of California, Los Angeles. He is a member of the NAS and has served on the National Academies Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, the Committee on Seismology and Geodynamics, and the Committee on National Requirements for Precision Geodetic Infrastructure.

ROBIN E. BELL is a senior research scientist at Columbia University in the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. At Columbia University Dr. Bell directs major research programs on the Hudson River and in Antarctica. Dr. Bell has studied the mechanisms of ice-sheet collapse and the chilly environments beneath the Antarctic ice sheet, including Lake Vostok, and she has led seven major aero-geophysical expeditions to Antarctica. She received the Columbia University Department of Geological Sciences Storke Award in 1992. Dr. Bell earned a Ph.D. in geology from Columbia University. She served on the National Academies Committee on the Development of a Strategic Vision and Implementation Plan for the U.S. Antarctic Program, on the Committee on Antarctic and Southern Ocean Service Review, and on the Polar Research Board.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

EMILY E. BRODSKY is a professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Dr. Brodsky is an earthquake physicist whose research primarily focuses on identifying the processes that trigger earthquakes and constraining the forces and processes that occur inside a fault zone during slip. These studies require tools from a number of fields including seismology, rheology, hydrogeology, and structural geology. Dr. Brodsky is the recipient of the inaugural Charles Richter Early Career Award from the Seismological Society of America and the James Macelwane Medal from the AGU and is an AGU fellow. She was selected as a distinguished lecturer for the NSF Earthscope program, the Geo-Prisms program, and the National Science Board. She has served on the board of directors of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) and Incorporated Research Institutes for Seismology (IRIS). She has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles and presented over 150 invited lectures or keynote talks in 30 states and 13 countries. Her work has been featured in major press outlets such as the BBC, NPR, Time Magazine, New York Times, Nature, Reuters, Los Angeles Times, and Wall Street Journal. She was a 2001 Miller Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Brodsky earned a Ph.D. from Caltech. She has served on the National Academies Committee on Seismology and Geodynamics.

DONALD P. CHAMBERS is an associate professor at the University of South Florida in the College of Marine Science. Dr. Chambers specializes in using satellite observations such as radar altimetry and satellite gravimetry to better understand ocean dynamics and sea-level variability. Previously, Dr. Chambers was a research scientist at the Center for Space Research at the University of Texas, Austin. He is a recipient of the AGU Geodesy Section Award. He earned a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas, Austin. He has not previously served on a National Academies committee.

LUCY M. FLESCH is a professor of geophysics at Purdue University in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences in the College of Science. At Purdue University Dr. Flesch has addressed fundamental questions in geophysics relating to quantifying forces driving continental deformation, especially far inboard from the plate edge; determination of role of the convecting mantle in driving surface motions; assessing the level of crust/mantle and lithosphere/asthenosphere coupling; and determining the strength of the continental lithosphere. Her research is done through observationally based numerical simulations that integrate data from geology, geodesy, and seismology. Previously, Dr. Flesch was a postdoctoral fellow at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. She was a member of the writing team Dynamics of Continents: Geodynamics Grand Challenges White Paper commissioned by NSF for National Academies use. She earned a Ph.D. in geophysics from Stony Brook University.

GEORGE E. HILLEY is an associate professor at Stanford University in the Department of Geological Sciences. At Stanford University Dr. Hilley leads the Tectonic Geomorphology Laboratory, which uses geologic observations, remote-sensing data, laboratory analyses, and physically based models to understand landscape change along active plate margins. Specifically, he has combined geologic mapping, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measures of ground deformation, GPS motions, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) topography, high-resolution airborne lidar, cosmogenic radionuclide abundances, and numerical models to understand landscape change over a range of time scales. Previously, Dr. Hilley was an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at the Universität Potsdam, Germany, and a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Hilley earned a Ph.D. in geology from Arizona State University.

KRISTINE M. LARSON is a professor at CU Boulder in the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences. Dr. Larson’s research interests are focused on developing new applications for GPS instruments, including

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

measuring seismic displacements, ice-sheet speeds and firn density, soil moisture, vegetation water content, snow depth, volcanic ash, and water levels. She is an AGU fellow, a Huygens Medalist, and the recipient of the Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz Creativity Award for Water. Dr. Larson earned a Ph.D. in geophysics from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UCSD. She has served as a member on the National Academies Committee on New Research Opportunities in the Earth Sciences at NSF and the Committee on National Requirements for Precision Geodetic Infrastructure.

STEFAN MAUS is a senior scientist at CU Boulder at CIRES. At CIRES Dr. Maus analyzes satellite, airborne, marine, and ground magnetic data to model contributions to the geomagnetic field originating in Earth’s core, mantle, crust, oceans, and space. From 2004 to 2014 he supported the Department of Defense, NOAA, Coast Guard, Federal Aviation Administration, NASA, and the general public to provide accurate geomagnetic reference information for navigation and pointing. In particular, he led the development and release of the World Magnetic Model (WMM) and International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) for the years 2005 and 2010, and developed the Enhanced Magnetic Model (EMM) and the Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2). Dr. Maus is the project leader of international standard ISO16695-Geomagnetic reference models. He contributed in an official advisory role to the Swarm triple-satellite constellation mission, launched successfully in November 2013. Previously, Dr. Maus was a mission scientist on the Challenging Mini-satellite Payload (CHAMP) team at Helmholtz Center Potsdam. He earned a Ph.D. in geophysics from Osmania University, Hyderabad, and his Habilitation in geophysics from the Technical University, Braunschweig.

MICHAEL S. RAMSEY is a professor at the University of Pittsburgh in the Department of Geology and Environmental Science. At the University of Pittsburgh Dr. Ramsey formed the Image Visualization and Infrared Spectroscopy (IVIS) Laboratory, which is a state-of-the-art image analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and GPS facility. His research interests are quite varied but focus on physical volcanology, the impact of volcanic emissions on the atmosphere, hazard mitigation, planetary surface processes, and eolian dynamics primarily using thermal infrared (TIR) imaging analysis, spectroscopy, and satellite remote sensing. Dr. Ramsey also serves as a science team member on three TIR NASA instruments: the Earth-orbiting Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER), the Mars-orbiting Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and the airborne Mineral and Gas Identifier (MAGI). Prior to coming to the University of Pittsburgh he was a postdoctoral researcher and visiting faculty member in the Department of Geology (now the School of Earth and Space Exploration) at Arizona State University. Dr. Ramsey was appointed by the NASA administrator as an inaugural member of the Earth Science Subcommittee from 2006-2009. He earned a Ph.D. in geology from Arizona State University. He has not previously served on a National Academies committee.

JEANNE SAUBER is a geophysicist in the Geodesy and Geodynamics Laboratory at NASA GSFC. At NASA Dr. Sauber has led research using numerical modeling techniques constrained by crustal deformation, gravity change, high-resolution topography, and other data to study the mechanics of subduction zones, to constrain earthquake source processes, and to determine the crust-mantle rheological structure. She has been a science team member on the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), ICESat, GRACE, and GRACE-Follow On (GRACE-FO) satellite missions and a member of the Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) and Lidar Surface Topography (LIST) mission concept study teams. Her contribution to these missions includes leading science studies, calibration and validation of early data products, and mission design. She has served as a Journal of Geophysical Research—Solid Earth associate editor and on numerous geodesy advisory committees. Dr. Sauber earned a Ph.D. in geophysics at MIT.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×

KHALID A. SOOFI is a science fellow at ConocoPhillips. Prior to joining ConocoPhillips Dr. Soofi worked at CRINC (a NASA research group at the University of Kansas) as project engineer, where he designed the FM-CW Radar for various research projects. He was the project lead in designing antenna calibration algorithms for the SeaSat satellite and radar background-clutter model for the U.S. Air Force. Since joining ConocoPhillips Dr. Soofi has worked on a full spectrum of remote sensing projects ranging from geological and geomorphological analysis of images, to image processing for logistics, to mapping and engineering applications, as well as environmental baseline studies. Dr. Soofi earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Kansas.

HOWARD A. ZEBKER is professor and chair at Stanford University in the Department of Geophysics. Dr. Zebker also serves as associate chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. His research group specializes in interferometric radar remote sensing applications and technique development. Originally a microwave engineer, Dr. Zebker built support equipment for the SeaSat satellite synthetic aperture radar and designed airborne radar systems. He later developed imaging radar polarimetry, a technique for measurement of the radar scattering matrix of a surface. He is best known for the development of radar interferometry, leading to spaceborne and airborne sensors capable of measuring topography to meter scale accuracy and surface deformation to mm scale. More recently, he has been participating in the NASA Cassini Mission to Saturn, concentrating on analysis of data acquired by the radar/radiometer instrument. He is a fellow of the IEEE. Dr. Zebker earned a Ph.D. from Stanford University. He served as a member of the National Academies Committee on the Implementation of a Sustained Land Imaging Program; the Panel on Solid-Earth Hazards, Resources, and Dynamics; and the Advanced Rader Technology Panel.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Panel Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24938.
×
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Next: Appendix G: Acronyms and Abbreviations »
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We live on a dynamic Earth shaped by both natural processes and the impacts of humans on their environment. It is in our collective interest to observe and understand our planet, and to predict future behavior to the extent possible, in order to effectively manage resources, successfully respond to threats from natural and human-induced environmental change, and capitalize on the opportunities – social, economic, security, and more – that such knowledge can bring.

By continuously monitoring and exploring Earth, developing a deep understanding of its evolving behavior, and characterizing the processes that shape and reshape the environment in which we live, we not only advance knowledge and basic discovery about our planet, but we further develop the foundation upon which benefits to society are built. Thriving on Our Changing Planet presents prioritized science, applications, and observations, along with related strategic and programmatic guidance, to support the U.S. civil space Earth observation program over the coming decade.

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