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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidebook for Advanced Computerized Maintenance Management System Integration at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25053.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidebook for Advanced Computerized Maintenance Management System Integration at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25053.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidebook for Advanced Computerized Maintenance Management System Integration at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25053.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidebook for Advanced Computerized Maintenance Management System Integration at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25053.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidebook for Advanced Computerized Maintenance Management System Integration at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25053.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidebook for Advanced Computerized Maintenance Management System Integration at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25053.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidebook for Advanced Computerized Maintenance Management System Integration at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25053.
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A I R P O R T C O O P E R A T I V E R E S E A R C H P R O G R A M ACRP RESEARCH REPORT 155 2018 Research sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration Subscriber Categories Aviation  •  Maintenance and Preservation Guidebook for Advanced Computerized Maintenance Management System Integration at Airports John Fortin Priscilla Bloomfield CH2M Boston, MA Joseph Mahaz ElECtroniC Data, inC. St. Petersburg, FL and Laith Alfaqih StantEC Cincinnati, OH

AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM Airports are vital national resources. They serve a key role in trans- portation of people and goods and in regional, national, and interna- tional commerce. They are where the nation’s aviation system connects with other modes of transportation and where federal responsibility for managing and regulating air traffic operations intersects with the role of state and local governments that own and operate most airports. Research is necessary to solve common operating problems, to adapt appropriate new technologies from other industries, and to introduce innovations into the airport industry. The Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) serves as one of the principal means by which the airport industry can develop innovative near-term solutions to meet demands placed on it. The need for ACRP was identified in TRB Special Report 272: Airport Research Needs: Cooperative Solutions in 2003, based on a study spon- sored by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). ACRP carries out applied research on problems that are shared by airport operating agen- cies and not being adequately addressed by existing federal research programs. ACRP is modeled after the successful National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) and Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP). ACRP undertakes research and other technical activi- ties in various airport subject areas, including design, construction, legal, maintenance, operations, safety, policy, planning, human resources, and administration. ACRP provides a forum where airport operators can cooperatively address common operational problems. ACRP was authorized in December 2003 as part of the Vision 100— Century of Aviation Reauthorization Act. The primary participants in the ACRP are (1) an independent governing board, the ACRP Oversight Committee (AOC), appointed by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Transportation with representation from airport operating agencies, other stakeholders, and relevant industry organizations such as the Airports Council International-North America (ACI-NA), the American Associa- tion of Airport Executives (AAAE), the National Association of State Aviation Officials (NASAO), Airlines for America (A4A), and the Airport Consultants Council (ACC) as vital links to the airport community; (2) TRB as program manager and secretariat for the governing board; and (3) the FAA as program sponsor. In October 2005, the FAA executed a contract with the National Academy of Sciences formally initiating the program. ACRP benefits from the cooperation and participation of airport professionals, air carriers, shippers, state and local government officials, equipment and service suppliers, other airport users, and research organi- zations. Each of these participants has different interests and responsibili- ties, and each is an integral part of this cooperative research effort. Research problem statements for ACRP are solicited periodically but may be submitted to TRB by anyone at any time. It is the responsibility of the AOC to formulate the research program by identifying the highest priority projects and defining funding levels and expected products. Once selected, each ACRP project is assigned to an expert panel appointed by TRB. Panels include experienced practitioners and research specialists; heavy emphasis is placed on including airport professionals, the intended users of the research products. The panels prepare project statements (requests for proposals), select contractors, and provide technical guidance and counsel throughout the life of the project. The process for developing research problem statements and selecting research agencies has been used by TRB in managing coop- erative research programs since 1962. As in other TRB activities, ACRP project panels serve voluntarily without compensation. Primary emphasis is placed on disseminating ACRP results to the intended users of the research: airport operating agencies, service pro- viders, and academic institutions. ACRP produces a series of research reports for use by airport operators, local agencies, the FAA, and other interested parties; industry associations may arrange for workshops, training aids, field visits, webinars, and other activities to ensure that results are implemented by airport industry practitioners. ACRP RESEARCH REPORT 155 Project 09-14 ISSN 2572-3731 (Print) ISSN 2572-374X (Online) ISBN 978-0-309-44679-2 Library of Congress Control Number 2018933408 © 2018 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Authors herein are responsible for the authenticity of their materials and for obtaining written permissions from publishers or persons who own the copyright to any previously published or copyrighted material used herein. Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) grants permission to reproduce material in this publication for classroom and not-for-profit purposes. Permission is given with the understanding that none of the material will be used to imply TRB, AASHTO, FAA, FHWA, FMCSA, FRA, FTA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology, PHMSA, or TDC endorsement of a particular product, method, or practice. It is expected that those reproducing the material in this document for educational and not-for-profit uses will give appropriate acknowledgment of the source of any reprinted or reproduced material. For other uses of the material, request permission from CRP. NOTICE The research report was reviewed by the technical panel and accepted for publication according to procedures established and overseen by the Transportation Research Board and approved by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The opinions and conclusions expressed or implied in this report are those of the researchers who performed the research and are not necessarily those of the Transportation Research Board; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; or the program sponsors. The Transportation Research Board; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; and the sponsors of the Airport Cooperative Research Program do not endorse products or manufacturers. Trade or manufacturers’ names appear herein solely because they are considered essential to the object of the report. Published research reports of the AIRPORT COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM are available from Transportation Research Board Business Office 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001 and can be ordered through the Internet by going to http://www.national-academies.org and then searching for TRB Printed in the United States of America

The National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, non- governmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia McNutt is president. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to bring the practices of engineering to advising the nation. Members are elected by their peers for extraordinary contributions to engineering. Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., is president. The National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) was established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues. Members are elected by their peers for distinguished contributions to medicine and health. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president. The three Academies work together as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. The National Academies also encourage education and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding in matters of science, engineering, and medicine. Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at www.national-academies.org. The Transportation Research Board is one of seven major programs of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The mission of the Transportation Research Board is to increase the benefits that transportation contributes to society by providing leadership in transportation innovation and progress through research and information exchange, conducted within a setting that is objective, interdisciplinary, and multimodal. The Board’s varied committees, task forces, and panels annually engage about 7,000 engineers, scientists, and other transportation researchers and practitioners from the public and private sectors and academia, all of whom contribute their expertise in the public interest. The program is supported by state transportation departments, federal agencies including the component administrations of the U.S. Department of Transportation, and other organizations and individuals interested in the development of transportation. Learn more about the Transportation Research Board at www.TRB.org.

C O O P E R A T I V E R E S E A R C H P R O G R A M S AUTHOR ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The research reported herein was performed under ACRP Project 09-14, “Advanced Computer Main- tenance Management System Integration for Airports,” by CH2M and Electronic Data, Inc. CH2M was the main contractor for this study and EDI was the subcontractor. John Fortin, LEED AP, was the principal investigator. Dr. Laith Alfaqih, P.E., was the deputy principal investigator and project manager. Priscilla Bloomfield also served as project manager. The research team would like to acknowledge the contributions of the following airports, non-airport organizations, and individuals: • Case Studies—Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, Salt Lake City International Airport, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Toronto Pearson International Airport, General Mitchell International Airport, and Gwinnett County Department of Water Resources; • Focus Group—Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (Aaron Davis), Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport (Charles Butcher), Toronto Pearson International Airport, Los Angeles World Air- ports (Christine Salvaggio), Columbus Regional Airport (Casey Denny), General Mitchell International Airport (Timothy Pearson), and Denver International Airport (Stephanie Sarmiento and Betty Trujillo); CRP STAFF FOR ACRP RESEARCH REPORT 155 Christopher J. Hedges, Director, Cooperative Research Programs Lori L. Sundstrom, Deputy Director, Cooperative Research Programs Michael R. Salamone, Manager, Airport Cooperative Research Program Marci A. Greenberger, Senior Program Officer Brittany Summerlin-Azeez, Program Coordinator Eileen P. Delaney, Director of Publications Natalie Barnes, Associate Director of Publications Sharon Lamberton, Editor ACRP PROJECT 09-14 PANEL Field of Maintenance Sarah J. Demory, City of Boise, Boise, ID (Chair) Majed Khater, Clark County (NV) Department of Aviation, Las Vegas, NV Casey Martin, Jacobs, Houston, TX Bob Montgomery, Southwest Airlines, Dallas, TX Robert C. Wilson, Kent County (MI) Department of Aeronautics, Grand Rapids, MI Thomas Mai, FAA Liaison Raymond “Ray” Zee, FAA Liaison Paul J. Eubanks, Airports Council International—North America Liaison Christine Gerencher, TRB Liaison (continued on page viii)

A Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) can be used to manage a variety of assets across a number of different airport systems. The robust features and varied functionalities of the CMMS software available today offer users opportunities and challenges. Given the breadth, complexity, and integration of the systems involved, imple- menting a new or replacement CMMS can be overwhelming. Phasing systems into the CMMS may result in a more successful implementation, and a business case is almost always the first step to help determine which systems should be the first to be managed through the CMMS. Successful integration of a CMMS can result in better decision making because the system provides timely and systemic information, but many industries have found implementation of a CMMS to be a challenging endeavor. This guidebook is designed to assist airport staff in determining which systems are best managed in the CMMS and in what order of implementation. As part of ACRP Project 09-14, CH2M was selected to develop guidance on the steps necessary to implement a CMMS, factors for consideration in prioritizing which systems should be included in the CMMS using a phased approach, and the steps for integrating CMMS data into performance management and business decision making. Their research included gathering information and data from airports and organizations from other industries through case studies, focus groups, and surveys. This guidebook will assist airport staff in overcoming some of the challenges associated with implementing a new or replacement CMMS allowing for improved integration with their asset management program and decision-making processes. F O R E W O R D By Marci A. Greenberger Staff Officer Transportation Research Board

1 Chapter 1 Introduction 1 Project Background 2 CMMS at Airports 5 Guidebook Content and Organization 6 Chapter 2 State of the Airport Industry  in CMMS Implementation 6 Approach 6 Results and Analysis 18 Discussion and Conclusions 20 Chapter 3 Designing the CMMS with the End in Mind 20 Key Considerations in Designing a CMMS Program/System 22 Maintenance Business Processes and the CMMS Workflow 23 Choosing Assets/Systems to Include in the CMMS 24 Necessary Steps to Integrate the Identified Assets/Systems into CMMS 25 Steps to Determine the Critical Information Needed from CMMS 26 Steps to Implementing a CMMS 29 Transforming Data to Actionable Information 29 Integration of CMMS with Other Critical Airport Systems 31 Key Considerations and Approaches for Small Airports 35 Chapter 4 Case Studies 35 Discussion 38 Lessons Learned 46 Chapter 5 CMMS Integration into Business  Decision Making 46 Overview of ACRP Report 19A: Resource Guide to Airport Performance Indicators 48 Leveraging CMMS Data to Inform Decision Making 49 Developing a Performance Management Strategy 51 Development of a Performance Measurement Model 53 Setting Up CMMS to Support Performance Management 58 Effective Communication 62 Chapter 6 Best Practices for Establishing Consistent  Asset Taxonomy, Hierarchy, and Attributes 62 Taxonomy and Hierarchy 63 Attributes C O N T E N T S

69 Chapter 7 CMMS Implementation and Compliance with ISO 55001 69 The ISO 5500X Series 69 CMMS and Asset Management Fundamentals (ISO 55000, Clause 2.4.2) 70 CMMS and ISO 55001 71 Planning to Achieve Objectives (ISO 55001, Clause 6.2.2) 71 Internal and External Communication (ISO 55001, Clause 7.4) 72 Documented Information (ISO 55001, Clause 7.6) 72 Operational Planning and Control (ISO 55001, Clause 8.1) 72 Management of Outsourced Activities (ISO 55001, Clause 8.3) 72 Asset Performance Monitoring (ISO 55001, Clause 9.1) 74 Asset Nonconformity and Corrective Actions (ISO 55001, Clause 10.1) 74 Preventive Actions (ISO 55001, Clause 10.2) 75 Summary 77 References 78 Abbreviations 80 Glossary A-1 Appendix A  Case Studies B-1 Appendix B   Gwinnett County Department of Water  Resources List of Asset Attributes, CMMS  Workflow, Work Order Prioritization, and KPIs Note: Photographs, figures, and tables in this report may have been converted from color to grayscale for printing. The electronic version of the report (posted on the web at www.trb.org) retains the color versions. AUTHOR ACKNOWLEDGMENTS (Continued) • Survey—Addison Airport, Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, Boston Logan Inter- national Airport, Charlotte Douglas International Airport, Chicago O’Hare International Airport, John Glenn Columbus International Airport, Denver International Airport, Edmonton International Airport, Eugene Airport, General Mitchell International Airport, Los Angeles World Airports, Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, Memphis International Airport, Metropolitan Nash- ville Airport Authority, Minden-Tahoe Airport, Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport Authority, Orlando International Airport, Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, Reagan National Airport, Reid-Hillview and San Martin Airport, Salt Lake City Inter national Airport, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, and Tri-Cities Regional Airport; and • CH2M Team—Jim Oldach, Joy Swenson, Craig Omundsen, and Rose Keelor.

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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 155: Guidebook for Advanced Computerized Maintenance Management System Integration at Airports explores the use of a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) to manage a variety of assets across a number of different airport systems. This report develops guidance on the steps necessary to implement a CMMS, factors for consideration in prioritizing which systems should be included in the CMMS using a phased approach, and the steps for integrating CMMS data into performance management and business decision making.

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