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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding the Long-Term Evolution of the Coupled Natural-Human Coastal System: The Future of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25108.
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APPENDIX B


People Who Provided Input to the Committee

Meeting 1: Washington, DC
May 17, 2017

Tom Drake, Ocean, Atmosphere and Space Research, Office of Naval Research

Nicole Elko, American Shore and Beach Preservation Association

David Kidwell, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Tucker Mahoney, Federal Emergency Management Agency

Julie Dean Rosati, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Hilary Stockdon, Coastal and Marine Geology Program, U.S. Geological Survey

George Voulgaris, Physical Oceanography Program, National Science Foundation

Meeting 2: Houston, Texas
July 18–19, 2017

Phil Berke, Texas A&M University

Carl Bernier, Rice University

Cas Bridge, Chevron

Noreen Clancy, RAND Corporation

Don Danmeier, Chevron

Carl Ferraro, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

Angelina Freeman, Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority

Maria Lemos, University of Michigan

Ryan Moyer, Florida Department of Environmental Protection

Ray Newby, Texas General Land Office

Natalie Peyronnin, Environmental Defense Fund

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding the Long-Term Evolution of the Coupled Natural-Human Coastal System: The Future of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25108.
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George Ramseur, Mississippi Department of Marine Resources

Denise Reed, The Water Institute of the Gulf

Ariana Sutton-Grier, University of Maryland

LaDon Swann, Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium

Jason Theriot, historian and author

Elizabeth Vargas, Texas General Land Office

Meeting 3: New Orleans, Louisiana
September 18, 2017

Damarys Acevedo-Mackey, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center

Mead Allison, The Water Institute of the Gulf

Joe Calantoni, Naval Research Laboratory

Brady Couvillion, U.S. Geological Survey

David Dismukes, Louisiana State University

John Alex McCorquodale, University of New Orleans

Ehab Meselhe, The Water Institute of the Gulf

Hugh Roberts, ARCADIS

Dano Roelvink, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education

Jenneke Visser, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Ian Voparil, Shell Deepwater Gulf of Mexico

Ty Wamsley, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mississippi Valley Division

Eric White, The Water Institute of the Gulf

Webinar
November 1, 2017

Brad Murray, Duke University

Meeting 4: St. Petersburg, Florida
November 15, 2017

Craig Colten, Louisiana State University

Mathew Hauer, University of Georgia

Kelli Levy, Environmental Management Division Director, Pinellas County

Shahzaad Mohammed, Cheniere LNG

Jim Schock, Florida Building Commission

Sherri Swanson, Environmental Project Manager, HDR Engineering, Inc.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding the Long-Term Evolution of the Coupled Natural-Human Coastal System: The Future of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25108.
×
Page 143
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Understanding the Long-Term Evolution of the Coupled Natural-Human Coastal System: The Future of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25108.
×
Page 144
Understanding the Long-Term Evolution of the Coupled Natural-Human Coastal System: The Future of the U.S. Gulf Coast Get This Book
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The U.S. Gulf Coast provides a valuable setting to study deeply connected natural and human interactions and feedbacks that have led to a complex, interconnected coastal system. The physical landscape in the region has changed significantly due to broad-scale, long-term processes such as coastal subsidence and river sediment deposition as well as short-term episodic events such as hurricanes. Modifications from human activities, including building levees and canals and constructing buildings and roads, have left their own imprint on the natural landscape. This coupled natural-human coastal system and the individual aspects within it (physical, ecological, and human) are under increased pressure from accelerating environmental stressors such as sea level rise, intensifying hurricanes, and continued population increase with its accompanying coastal development. Promoting the resilience and maintaining the habitability of the Gulf Coast into the future will need improved understanding of the coupled natural-human coastal system, as well as effective sharing of this understanding in support of decision-making and policies.

Understanding the Long-term Evolution of the Coupled Natural-Human Coastal System presents a research agenda meant to enable a better understanding of the multiple and interconnected factors that influence long-term processes along the Gulf Coast. This report identifies scientific and technical gaps in understanding the interactions and feedbacks between human and natural processes, defines essential components of a research and development program in response to the identified gaps, and develops priorities for critical areas of research.

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