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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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B

Speaker Biographies

David A. Acosta, M.D., is Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer, of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), where he provides strategic vision and leadership for the AAMC’s diversity and inclusion activities across the medical education community, and leads the association’s Diversity Policy and Programs unit. A physician of family medicine, Dr. Acosta joined the AAMC from the University of California (UC), Davis, School of Medicine where he served as senior associate dean for equity, diversity, and inclusion and associate vice chancellor for diversity and inclusion and chief diversity officer for UC Davis Health System. He previously served as the inaugural chief diversity officer at the University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine, where he established a rural health fellowship program for Tacoma Family Medicine, a residency program affiliated with the UW Department of Family Medicine.

Dr. Acosta received his bachelor’s degree in biology from Loyola University and earned his medical degree from the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine. He completed his residency training at Community Hospital of Sonoma County in Santa Rosa, California, and a faculty development fellowship at the UW Department of Family Medicine.

Dimitri T. Azar, M.D., M.B.A., is Dean of the University of Illinois College of Medicine. He holds the B.A. Field Chair in ophthalmologic research, and is Professor of Ophthalmology, Bioengineering, and Pharmacology. Dr. Azar joined the University of Illinois at Chicago, in 2006, as Head of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences after serving as

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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tenured Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School, Director of the Cornea Service at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Senior Scientist at the Schepens Eye Institute, and as faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Azar brings experience in administration, research, education, and clinical practice to his position as Dean of the College of Medicine. He earned an executive M.B.A. with high honors from the University of Chicago. Dr. Azar is the author of more than 400 scientific articles and book chapters. He is the editor of 14 books in ophthalmology and he holds 15 patents. Dr. Azar has been named one of The Best Doctors in America and/or one of the Castle Connolly regional Top Doctors in America annually since 1994. He is a leader in basic science and clinically related vision research, making significant contributions to the treatment of corneal diseases and to advances in refractive surgery through mathematical analyses and applications of advanced optics. His basic science research on matrix metalloproteinases in corneal wound healing and angiogenesis has been continually funded by the National Eye Institute R01 award since 1993. He serves as a trustee for the Chicago Ophthalmological Society and for the Association of Research and Vision in Ophthalmology. Dr. Azar has also received multiple leadership awards, including the 2009 Lans Distinguished Award and the University of Illinois at Chicago Scholar Award.

David Blumenthal, M.D., M.P.P., is President of The Commonwealth Fund, a national philanthropy engaged in independent research on health and social policy issues. Dr. Blumenthal is formerly the Samuel O. Thier Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief Health Information and Innovation Officer at Partners Healthcare System in Boston. From 2009 to 2011, he served as the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, with the charge to build an interoperable, private, and secure nationwide health information system and to support the widespread, meaningful use of health information technology. He succeeded in putting in place one of the largest publicly funded infrastructure investments the nation has ever made in such a short time period, in health care or any other field.

Previously, Dr. Blumenthal was a practicing primary care physician, director of the Institute for Health Policy, and professor of medicine and health policy at Massachusetts General Hospital/Partners Healthcare System and Harvard Medical School. He is the author of more than 250 books and scholarly publications, including most recently, Heart of Power: Health and Politics in the Oval Office. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and serves on the editorial boards of the New England Journal of Medicine and the Journal of Delivery Science and Innovation. He has also served on the staff of the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Health and Scien-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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tific Research; is the founding chairman of AcademyHealth, the national organization of health services researchers; and is a trustee of the University of Pennsylvania Health System.

Dr. Blumenthal received his undergraduate, medical, and public policy degrees from Harvard University and completed his residency in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. With his colleagues from Harvard Medical School, he authored the seminal studies on the adoption and use of health information technology in the United States. He has held several leadership positions in medicine, government, and academia, including senior vice president at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital and executive director of the Center for Health Policy and Management and lecturer on public policy at the Kennedy School of Government. He served previously on the board of the University of Chicago Health System and is recipient of the Distinguished Investigator Award from AcademyHealth, an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Rush University, and an Honorary Doctor of Science from Claremont Graduate University and the State University of New York Downstate.

Cedric M. Bright, M.D., FACP, is the Associate Dean for Inclusive Excellence, Director of the Office of Special Programs, and Associate Professor in the Division of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. He served as the 112th President of the National Medical Association from 2011 to 2012. He was previously Associate Clinical Professor of Internal Medicine and Community and Family Medicine at Duke University and a staff physician at the VA Medical Center in Durham. Dr. Bright also served on the North Carolina Medical Society Patient Safety Taskforce; chaired the board of directors at the Lincoln Community Health Center; has spoken about health disparities before the Congressional Black Caucus; was a medical ambassador to Ghana; and has served as a mentor for the Student National Medical Association. He is a dedicated leader in delivering patient equity through broader access, and is a staunch proponent of health care reform.

L. D. Britt, M.D., M.P.H., D.Sc. (Hon.), FACS, FCCM, FRCSEng (Hon.), FRCSEd (Hon.), FWACS (Hon.), FRCSI (Hon.), FCS(SA) (Hon.), a native of Suffolk, Virginia, received his B.A. with Distinction from the University of Virginia. Dr. Britt, a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, is the Henry Ford Professor and Edward J. Brickhouse Chairman of the Department of Surgery at Eastern Virginia Medical School. He is the author of more than 220 peer-reviewed publications, more than 50 book chapters and non-peer-reviewed articles, and three books, including a recent edition of the highly touted Acute Care Surgery (Lippincott, Williams & Wilkens, Medford, NJ). He serves

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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on numerous editorial boards, including the Annals of Surgery, Archives of Surgery, World Journal of Surgery, Journal of the American College of Surgeons, the American Journal of Surgery (Associate Editor), the Journal of Trauma, Shock, Journal of Surgical Education, the American Surgeon, and others. In addition, he is a reviewer for the New England Journal of Medicine.

Dr. Britt, a member of Alpha Omega Alpha, is the recipient of the nation’s highest teaching award in medicine—the Robert J. Glaser Distinguished Teaching Award, which is given by the AAMC in conjunction with Alpha Omega Alpha. He was honored by the Association of Surgical Education with its lifetime achievement award—the Distinguished Educator Award—given annually to one person considered by his peers to be a true master. More than 190 institutions throughout the world have invited him to be their distinguished visiting professor. He was recently the William P. Longmire, M.D., Visiting Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Dr. Britt is the past President of the Society of Surgical Chairs and the past Chairman of the ACGME Residency Review Committee for Surgery. Also, he is past Secretary of the Southern Surgical Association, the past Recorder/Program Chair for the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, and past President of the Southeastern Surgical Congress, the Halsted Society, and the Southern Surgical Association. Dr. Britt is the past Chairman of the Board of Regents of the American College of Surgeons. He is also past President of the American College of Surgeons, the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, and the American Surgical Association.

At the inaugural presidential ceremony held in Washington, DC, during the 96th annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons, Dr. Britt was awarded the U.S. Surgeon General’s medallion for his outstanding achievements in medicine. The Honorable Regina Benjamin, M.D., the 18th U.S. Surgeon General, presented this award at a formal ceremony. Dr. Britt was also appointed to the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar Program National Advisory Committee. The National Library of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health (in collaboration with the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture) featured Dr. Britt for his contributions to academic surgery. President George W. Bush recognized Dr. Britt’s leadership role in medicine and nominated him to the Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services University (confirmed by the U.S. Senate). At the end of his tenure, Dr. Britt was awarded the coveted Distinguished Service Medal. The National Board of Medical Examiners also awarded him the Edithe J. Levit Distinguished Service Award. An active participant in the community, Dr. Britt has received numerous awards for public service. Dr. Britt is the recipient of the 2010 Colgate Darden Citizen of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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the Year Award and the 2011 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Community Award. Atlanta Post recently highlighted him as one of the top 21 black doctors in America. Ebony magazine recently listed him as one of the most influential African Americans in the nation. At the 2012 annual meeting of the American Surgical Association, Dr. Britt became the 132nd President of the organization. He was conferred an Honorary Doctorate by the President of Tuskegee University. Dr. Britt was also elected to the position of Commissioner of The Joint Commission (formerly JACHO). In 2012, he was conferred an Honorary Fellowship in the French Academy of Surgery and the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa. Having recently been awarded an Honorary Fellowship in the Royal College of Surgeons of Glasgow, Dr. Britt now has the distinction of receiving the highest honor given by each of the four Royal Colleges in the United Kingdom—England, Edinburg, Ireland, and Glasgow. Dr. Britt, author of the term acute care surgery and one of the principal architects of this emerging specialty, was the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Roswell Park Medal. At the 2015 annual meeting of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, Dr. Britt was bestowed the coveted title of “Master of Critical Care Medicine” by the American College of Critical Care Medicine. In 2015, Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe appointed Dr. Britt to the Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. Also, the Southern Surgical Association awarded Dr. Britt the organization’s highest accolade—Honorary Fellowship—at its 2015 annual meeting. In the spring of 2016, Dr. Britt was awarded the Urban League of Hampton Roads Professor Marian Capps Memorial Award for his accomplishments in community service through education. At the 148th commencement at Howard University, Dr. Britt was conferred an honorary doctorate (Doctor of Science). In the summer of 2016 Dr. Britt serendipitously conducted his 200th visiting professorship at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Illinois (where Dr. Britt completed his residency training). He was the inaugural John A. Barrett, M.D. Lecturer who kicked off the 50th anniversary celebration for the Cook County Hospital Trauma Unit. Dr. Britt was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2016.

Kendall M. Campbell, M.D., FAAFP, is Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion and Director of the Research Group for Underrepresented Minorities in Academic Medicine at the East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine. Dr. Campbell was one of the first Science Students Together Reaching Instructional Diversity and Excellence (SSTRIDE) mentors and instructors. SSTRIDE seeks to identify and encourage middle and high school students from underrepresented backgrounds, including those from rural communities. He became a part of the program in 1994 while an undergraduate student and chemistry pre-med major at

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Florida A&M University. After completing his undergraduate degree, Dr. Campbell attended the Program in Medical Sciences, a 1-year program created to help promote diversity in Florida’s medical schools by attracting more students from backgrounds underrepresented in medicine and in the Florida physician workforce. After the completion of medical school, he went on to become a board-certified family physician with special interests in underserved care and teaching. Dr. Campbell is the learning center advisor for the Bridge to Clinical Medicine master’s degree program, a program to increase underrepresented groups in medicine, and as codirector of the Center for Underrepresented Minorities in Academic Medicine conducts research to study issues affecting underrepresented minority faculty in medical education. He sees patients at Bond Community Health Center, a community health center for the underserved.

Benjamin S. Carson, Sr., M.D., is the 17th Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. For nearly 30 years, Secretary Carson served as Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, a position he assumed when he was just 33 years old, becoming the youngest major division director in the hospital’s history. In 1987, he successfully performed the first separation of craniopagus twins conjoined at the back of the head. He also performed the first fully successful separation of type-2 vertical craniopagus twins in 1997 in South Africa.

Dr. Carson received dozens of honors and awards in recognition of his achievements including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. He is also a recipient of the Spingarn Medal, the highest honor bestowed by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Dr. Carson authored nine books, four of which he co-wrote with his wife Candy. The U.S. News Media Group and Harvard’s Center for Public Leadership named him among “America’s Best Leaders” in 2008.

Dr. Carson and his wife cofounded the Carson Scholars Fund, which recognizes young people of all backgrounds for exceptional academic and humanitarian accomplishments. The Fund currently operates in 50 states and the District of Columbia, and has recognized more than 7,300 scholars, awarded more than $7.3 million in scholarships, and installed more than 150 Ben Carson Reading Rooms around the country.

Born in Detroit to a single mother with a 3rd-grade education who worked multiple jobs to support their family, Dr. Carson was raised to love reading and education. He graduated from Yale University and earned his M.D. from the University of Michigan Medical School.

Veronica Catanese, M.D., M.B.A., is Cosecretary of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) and Senior Director of accreditation

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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services at the AAMC. She leads the AAMC’s accreditation services unit and collaborates with her counterpart at the American Medical Association to accredit U.S. M.D.-granting medical schools.

Dr. Catanese most recently served as Vice Dean, Dean for academic affairs, and Principal Business Officer at the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra Northwell, where she was the Dr. Leo A. Guthart Professor of Medicine and a member of the school’s founding team. Before Hofstra Northwell, Dr. Catanese was a tenured faculty member in the departments of medicine and cell biology at New York University (NYU) School of Medicine, where she spent a decade as Senior Associate Dean for education and student affairs. During her time at Hofstra Northwell and at NYU, she participated in six LCME accreditation cycles, leading the preparations on four occasions.

Dr. Catanese has served in various leadership roles with the American Federation for Medical Research, including as a National Councilor, Public Policy Chair, President, and Foundation President, as well as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Investigative Medicine. She has chaired a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biomedical technology transfer study section, and was selected as a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Clinical Research Roundtable and Cochair of the training subcommittee of the NIH Director’s Clinical Research Roadmap working group.

Dr. Catanese received her bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College and earned her medical degree from NYU School of Medicine, where she was elected to membership in Alpha Omega Alpha. She completed her residency and chief residency in internal medicine and a clinical fellowship in endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at NYU Medical Center, followed by a research fellowship at Joslin Diabetes Center. She received her M.B.A. from the NYU Stern School of Business.

André L. Churchwell, M.D., is Levi Watkins Jr., M.D. Chair and Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Chief Diversity Officer, and a Professor of Medicine (Cardiology), Professor of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and Senior Associate Dean for Diversity Affairs at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He was named the 2005 Walter R. Murray Jr. Distinguished Alumnus by the Association of Vanderbilt Black Alumni. The award recognizes lifetime achievements in personal, professional, and community arenas.

Dr. Churchwell graduated from the Vanderbilt School of Engineering magna cum laude in 1975. He won the Biomedical Engineering Student Program Award that same year. He received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School in 1979 and later completed his internship, residency, and cardiology fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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and affiliated hospitals in Atlanta. In addition, he was the first African American chief medical resident at Grady Memorial Hospital (1984–1985).

Dr. Churchwell received the J. Willis Hurst Award for Best Clinical Teacher in 1991 from Emory, and in 2004 he was named the Emory University School of Medicine Resident Alumni Distinguished Achievement Award winner. For the past 10 years he has been named one of the nation’s top cardiologists in “The Best Doctors in America.”

In 1986, while at Emory, he was also named Most Outstanding House Officer, made an honorary Morehouse Medical School class member, and he received a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Minority Medical Faculty Development Award.

In 2010, he was awarded the Distinguished Alumnus Award of Vanderbilt University School of Engineering. Along with his physician brothers Kevin and Keith, he received the 2011 Trumpet Award for Medicine.

He serves on many medical school committees including the Admission and Promotion Committees and recently was named Dean of Diversity for Undergraduate Medical Education to add to his current role in the Dean’s office.

In 2012 and 2013, the Vanderbilt University Organization of Black Graduate and Professional Students honored Dr. Churchwell with one of the organization’s first Distinguished Faculty Awards. He was also recognized with an American Registry Most Compassionate Doctor Award. From 2010 to 2013, he has been awarded the Professional Research Consultants’ Five-Star Excellence Award—Top 10% Nationally for “Excellent” Responses for Medical Specialty Services and Overall Quality. And in 2014, he was honored as one of the Top 15 Most Influential African American Medical Educators by Black Health Magazine.

Furthermore, he was elected in 2012 to serve as the southern representative for the Group on Diversity and Inclusion for the AAMC. Since 2011, he has served on the editorial board of Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology: A Journal of the Biomedical Engineering Society. In 2013, he helped create the Hurst-Logue-Wenger Cardiovascular Fellows Society (HLWCFS) of Emory University School of Medicine and was elected the first President of HLWCFS.

Theodore Corbin, M.D., M.P.P., is Vice Chair for Research and an Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Drexel University College of Medicine. He also serves as the Medical Director of the “Healing Hurt People” program, an emergency department–based, trauma-informed intervention strategy that identifies victims of intentional injury. Dr. Corbin received his master’s in public policy from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. Recipient of the 2017

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Drexel University College of Medicine Distinguished Alumni, Dr. Corbin also codirects the Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice at Drexel University School of Public Health, where he holds a joint appointment. He was awarded a Stoneleigh Foundation Fellowship and an Annie E. Casey Foundation grant to explore the impact of posttraumatic stress disorder on violently injured youth and young adults, and to evaluate the effectiveness of Healing Hurt People. His work focuses broadly on addressing the trauma in the lives of victims of violence, especially boys and men of color for whom violence is a leading cause of disability and death.

Esther R. Dyer, M.L.S., D.L.S., is President and Chief Executive Officer of National Medical Fellowships (NMF), a nonprofit organization dedicated to building the next generation of health care leaders. Founded in 1946, NMF has provided more than 30,000 scholarships to diverse students in medicine and the health professions. Previously, she was Executive Director of the American-Italian Cancer Foundation and the U.S. Representative of the European School of Oncology. Prior positions have included Director of Public Affairs for Empire Blue Cross/Director of the Health Services Research Fund; Executive Director of the NYC March of Dimes; External Affairs Advisor to the Center for Bioenvironmental Research at Tulane and Xavier Universities; Senior Advisor External Affairs, Columbia Cornell Cares; and Assistant Professor and Member of the Graduate Faculty at Rutgers University.

She holds a doctorate in library science, Columbia University; a Certificado del Curso Medio, Universidad de Salamanca; masters in information policy, Rockefeller College, SUNY Albany (Distinguished Alumna); and a bachelors in secondary education, SUNY, New Paltz. She serves as a Board Member of the Lower Westside Home Health Agency, the Circumnavigators Club Foundation, and the Emy and Emil Herzfeld Foundation. She is a Life Member of the Circumnavigator’s Club and International President (2010–2012).

Victor J. Dzau, M.D., is the President of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), formerly the Institute of Medicine (IOM). In addition, he serves as Chair of the Health and Medicine Division Committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He is Chancellor Emeritus and James B. Duke Professor of Medicine at Duke University and the past President and Chief Executive Officer of the Duke University Health System. Previously, Dr. Dzau was the Hersey Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine and Chairman of Medicine at Harvard Medical School’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, as well as Chairman of the Department of Medicine at Stanford University.

Dr. Dzau has made a significant impact on medicine through his

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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research in cardiovascular medicine and genetics, his pioneering of the discipline of vascular medicine, and his leadership in health care innovation. His important work on the renin angiotensin system (RAS) paved the way for the contemporary understanding of RAS in cardiovascular disease and the development of RAS inhibitors as widely used lifesaving drugs. Dr. Dzau also pioneered gene therapy for vascular disease, and his recent work on stem cell paracrine mechanisms and the use of microRNA in direct reprogramming provides novel insight into stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

In his role as a leader in health care, Dr. Dzau has led efforts in health care innovation. His vision is for academic health sciences centers to lead the transformation of medicine through innovation, translation, and globalization. Leading this vision at Duke, he and his colleagues developed the Duke Translational Medicine Institute, the Duke Global Health Institute, the Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, and the Duke Institute for Health Innovation. These initiatives create a seamless continuum from discovery and translational sciences to clinical care, and they promote transformative innovation in health.

As one of the world’s preeminent academic health leaders, Dr. Dzau advises governments, corporations, and universities worldwide. He has been a member of the Council of the IOM and the Advisory Committee to the Director of the NIH, as well as Chair of the NIH Cardiovascular Disease Advisory Committee and the Association of Academic Health Centers. He served on the Governing Board of the Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School and the Board of Health Governors of the World Economic Forum and chaired its Global Agenda Council on Personalized and Precision Medicine. He also served as the Senior Health Policy Advisor to Her Highness Sheikha Moza (Chair of the Qatar Foundation). Currently, he is a member of the Board of Directors of the Singapore Health System, the Expert Board of the Imperial College Health Partners, UK, and the International Advisory Board of the Biomedical Science Council of Singapore. In 2011, he led a partnership between Duke University, the World Economic Forum, and McKinsey, and he founded the International Partnership for Innovative Healthcare Delivery and currently chairs its Board of Directors.

Among his honors and recognitions are the Gustav Nylin Medal from the Swedish Royal College of Medicine; the Max Delbruck Medal from Humboldt University, Charité, and the Max Planck Institute; the Commemorative Gold Medal from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich; the Inaugural Hatter Award from the Medical Research Council of South Africa; the Polzer Prize from the European Academy of Sciences and Arts; the Novartis Award for Hypertension Research; the Distinguished Scientist Award from the American Heart Association (AHA);

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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and the AHA Research Achievement Award for his contributions to cardiovascular biology and medicine. Recently, he was awarded the Public Service Medal by the President of Singapore. He has received 10 honorary doctorates.

Arthur C. Evans, Jr., Ph.D., is Chief Executive Officer of the American Psychological Association (APA). In this position, he heads the leading scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States, with nearly 115,700 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants, and students as its members. Before joining APA, Dr. Evans spent 12 years as commissioner of Philadelphia’s Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Service, a $1.2 billion health care agency that is the behavioral health and intellectual disabilities safety net for 1.5 million Philadelphians. He realigned the agency’s treatment philosophy, service delivery models, and fiscal policies to improve health outcomes and increase the efficiency of the service system. The transformation of the Philadelphia service system has saved millions of dollars that the city reinvested in other community-based services.

Dr. Evans has been recognized nationally and internationally for his work in behavioral health care policy and service delivery innovation. In 2015, he was recognized by the White House as an “Advocate for Action” by the Office of National Drug Control Policy. In 2013, he received the American Medical Association’s top government service award in health care, the Dr. Nathan Davis Award for Outstanding Government Service. Dr. Evans is also regarded as a strong mental health advocate and was recognized by Faces and Voices of Recovery with the Lisa Mojer-Torres Award. In 2017, he was awarded the Visionary Leadership Award by the National Council of Behavioral Health and inducted into the Florida Atlantic University Alumni Hall of Fame at his alma mater. He has also been recognized as a strong advocate for social justice, having received three different Martin Luther King Jr. awards.

Dr. Evans holds faculty appointments at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Drexel University School of Public Health, and the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, and he has held a faculty appointment at the Yale University School of Medicine.

Earlier in his career, Dr. Evans was deputy commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services, where he led major strategic initiatives in the state’s behavioral health care system. Similar to his work in Philadelphia, he was instrumental in implementing a recovery-oriented policy framework, addressing health care disparities, increasing the use of evidence-based practices, and significantly improving community engagement. He also developed a thriving private practice.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Dr. Evans is the author or coauthor of 40 peer-reviewed research articles and of numerous chapters, reviews, and editorials. He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment and a fellow and member of the board of trustees of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

Wayne A. I. Frederick, M.D., M.B.A., FACS, is Howard University’s 17th president. His goal is to enhance the Howard University legacy, ensure that the University maximizes its impact, and that its students receive a well-rounded educational experience.

As an undergraduate student, Frederick was admitted to Howard’s rigorous B.S./M.D. dual degree program. He completed the requirements for both the B.S. and M.D. degree in 6 years, allowing him to earn both degrees by the age of 22. He also received a master of business administration degree from Howard University’s School of Business in 2011.

Dr. Frederick continues to operate and lecture actively; the focal point of his medical research is to narrow the disparity in all cancer-care outcomes, with a focus on gastrointestinal cancers. A distinguished researcher and surgeon, Dr. Frederick has also received various awards honoring his scholarship and service.

In January 2017, the Federal Reserve System Board of Governors elected Dr. Frederick to the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond’s Baltimore Branch, and in May 2016, President Barack H. Obama elected Dr. Frederick to the Board of Advisors for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). In April 2016, Dr. Frederick became a member of the American Surgical Association, known as the nation’s oldest and most prestigious surgical organization.

Garth Graham, M.D., M.P.H., FACP, FACC,1 is a leading authority on social determinants of health. President of the Aetna Foundation and Vice President of Community Health for Aetna Inc., he is also a cardiologist and public health expert.

Dr. Graham oversees the community health initiatives for the Foundation and Aetna Inc., bringing his experience as a former deputy assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under the Obama and Bush administrations where he also ran the Office of Minority Health. He directed the development of the federal government’s first National Health Disparities Plan released under the Obama administration.

Dr. Graham has been a contributor to The Hill, the Chicago Tribune, Fortune, Quartz, Health Affairs, and Ebony, and has been featured in Essence,

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1 Garth Graham was unable to attend the meeting.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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CNN, and The New York Times among others. His original research has been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, American Journal of Public Health, Health Affairs, and other publications. Along with his role at the Aetna Foundation, Dr. Graham is a clinical associate professor of medicine at the University of Connecticut.

Prior to joining the Foundation, in his role as the assistant dean for health policy at the University of Florida School of Medicine, Garth led several research initiatives looking at how to improve outcomes and readmission rates in cardiac patients in underserved populations. He contributes to several boards including being named by the President to the U.S. Federal Coordinating Council on Comparative Effectiveness Research; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Population Health and Public Health Practice; the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association National Quality Oversight Committee; the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Data Standards; and many others.

Dr. Graham holds a medical degree from Yale School of Medicine, a master’s in public health from Yale School of Public Health, and a bachelor of science in biology from Florida International University in Miami. He completed clinical training in cardiology and interventional cardiology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Johns Hopkins. He holds three board certifications: internal medicine, cardiology, and interventional cardiology.

George C. Hill, Ph.D., is Levi Watkins Jr., M.D. Professor Emeritus in Medical Education and Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology. He was Vanderbilt University’s first Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer, a position he held until his retirement in July 2017. He served as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Multicultural Affairs and Special Assistant to the Provost for Health Affairs from 2011 to 2012. From 2002 to 2011, he served as the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine’s first Associate Dean for Diversity in Medical Education. Under Dr. Hill’s leadership, the medical school made significant progress toward increasing the diversity of the medical school class to more broadly represent different races/ethnicities, sexual orientations, economic backgrounds, religious backgrounds, and rural-vs.-urban upbringing.

Prior to being recruited to Vanderbilt in 2002, Dr. Hill spent 19 years at Meharry Medical College, where he served in a variety of senior faculty and administrative roles including dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research, vice president for research, associate vice president for international affairs, and director of the Division of Biomedical Sciences. In 2013, he received the Levi Watkins Jr., M.D. Award from

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine for fostering diversity and inclusion throughout the university as well as nationally.

Dr. Hill has mentored and trained hundreds of Ph.D. students, M.S. students, and postdoctoral fellows. In 1999, he was recognized as a “Giant in Science” by the Quality Education for Minorities Network for his commitment to motivating minority students to pursue the sciences.

Dr. Hill has led a distinguished career in biomedical research and medical education and is a world-renowned microbiologist. His laboratory was the first to grow the infective protozoan that carries sleeping sickness. His work to characterize the protozoan gave scientists an opportunity to develop drugs to treat sleeping sickness and was published in the leading scientific journal Science.

A member of the National Academy of Medicine since 1998, Hill was elected a fellow of the Academy of Microbiology in 2002. In 2011, he was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and was appointed to the NIH Fogarty International Center Scientific Advisory Board. The American Association for the Advancement of Science cited Dr. Hill’s leadership as president of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, where he also received the organization’s Utz Leadership Award, as well as his work advancing a diverse workplace and his contributions to research into tropical diseases. Dr. Hill was elected a fellow of health disparities of the Cobb Institute of the National Medical Association in 2014. He currently serves on the Cooper Medical School of Rowan University Medical Board.

Previous appointments and awards include serving as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Nairobi and as an NIH research fellow at the University of Cambridge, Great Britain; receiving the Seymour Hunter Prize from the Society of Protozoologists; and serving on the National Institute for General Medical Sciences Council and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Board of Scientific Counselors.

Dr. Hill graduated from Rutgers in 1961 and went on to receive his M.S. from Howard University and his Ph.D. from New York University, where he launched his career in the biomedical sciences.

Joseph B. Hill is Senior Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer for Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health System in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In this role, he is responsible for leading the integration of diversity, inclusion, and health equity to ensure excellence in education, research and patient care.

Prior to joining Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health System in 2015, Mr. Hill served as Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer for Froedtert and the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee where he developed a diversity and inclusion program that became an

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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integral part of the health system’s values, strategy, and operational initiatives. Under his leadership, Froedtert’s diversity and inclusion team was nationally recognized for supplier diversity and health care equality.

From 2007 to 2010, Mr. Hill was the Managing Director of Diversity and Inclusion for the American Cancer Society’s national home office in Atlanta, Georgia, where he provided strategic direction, management, and support for diversity and inclusion initiatives. He was also the American Cancer Society’s National Director of Diversity and External Partnerships with responsibility for working with all 17 divisions on diversity and inclusion strategies. In addition, he served as the senior leader in the development and implementation of business relationships with key diverse community organizations and leaders. Prior to the American Cancer Society, Mr. Hill applied his skills at the corporate headquarters of Cingular Wireless, which became AT&T Mobility, where he served as Senior Diversity Manager.

Mr. Hill earned a B.A. from Virginia Union University, an M.A. from Howard University, and a Certificate in Diversity Management in Health Care from Georgetown University and the Institute for Diversity in Health Management.

A native of Buffalo, New York, Mr. Hill is a frequent speaker at national forums where he shares his insights and experience on the importance of diversity and strategic partnerships in both the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Mr. Hill serves as a board member for Garden and Associates, LLC and the National Football Players Father’s Association, and is on the Advisory Board for Usher’s New Look Foundation.

Lynne Holden, M.D., is working to change the face of medicine. She is the energetic President, Chief Executive Officer, and visionary of Mentoring in Medicine. Dr. Holden provides the overall leadership, recruits volunteers, facilitates program development, creates organizational strategy, and establishes collaborative partnerships. Dr. Holden earned her B.S. in zoology from Howard University. After graduating from Temple University School of Medicine and completing her residency in emergency medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine-Jacobi/Montefiore Emergency Medicine Residency Program, she is now a practicing Emergency Department Physician at Montefiore Medical Center and serves as its Residency Site Director of the Emergency Medicine Residency Program. She is also an Associate Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, where she cochairs the Admissions Committee.

Her many accolades and awards include

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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  • Albert Einstein College of Medicine Leo Davidoff Society Teaching Award—2002
  • Universal Sisters’ Commitment to Women’s Health Award—2008
  • Maybelline NY-Essence Empowerment through Education Award—2007
  • Society of Emergency Medicine Diversity Interest Group’s first Visionary Educator Award— 2008
  • Woman of the Year Award by the National Council of Negro Women, North Bronx Section—2009
  • Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Community Health Leader—2009
  • Washington Post Root 100 Leader—2010
  • Lifetime TV Remarkable Woman—2010
  • Featured on CNN’s Sanjay Gupta’s Human Factor—2011
  • Outstanding Contribution to Health Professional Education Award from NAMME–Northeast—2008
  • Paul Burgess Community Advocate Award, Harlem Health Promotion Center, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University—2008
  • Gloria Bynoe Thomas Award by the City College Minority Association of Pre–Health Students—2009
  • Rev. Cannon Stewart Community Service Award by the Harlem Congregations for Community Improvement, Inc.—2009

Freeman A. Hrabowski III, Ph.D., President of UMBC (University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992, is a consultant on science and math education to national agencies, universities, and school systems. He was named by President Obama to chair the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. He also chaired the National Academies’ committee that produced the report Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads (2011).

Named one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World by TIME (2012) and one of America’s Best Leaders by U.S. News & World Report (2008), he also received TIAA-CREF’s Theodore M. Hesburgh Award for Leadership Excellence (2011), the Carnegie Corporation’s Academic Leadership Award (2011), and the Heinz Award (2012) for contributions to improving the “Human Condition.” UMBC has been recognized as a model for inclusive excellence by such publications as U.S. News & World Report, which for the past 8 years has recognized UMBC as a national leader in academic innovation and undergraduate teaching.

Marja Hurley, M.D., is Professor of Medicine and Orthopedics and Member of the Institute of Systems Genomics at the UConn School of Medicine.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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She is the first woman of color to receive the doctorate of medicine from UConn School of Medicine and the first to be a tenured full professor at the UConn School of Medicine. Dr. Hurley served as interim Senior Associate Dean for Education and Academic Affairs, Chair of the Education Council, and Chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Medical Education, UConn School of Medicine. Dr. Hurley has made outstanding contributions as an administrator, educator, and research scientist at UConn Health and received local, national, and international recognition and awards for her accomplishments in several of these domains. These include recipient of the prestigious 2016 Lawrence G. Raisz Esteemed Award from the American Society of Bone Mineral Research for preclinical translational research; induction into the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering; UConn Health Board of Directors Faculty Recognition Award; and the Neag Medal of Honor. She also received the University of Connecticut’s first Martin Luther King Award for Achievement in Science and was recognized as one of the outstanding women in 100 years at the University of Connecticut. She was the winner of the Connecticut Technology Council Women of Innovation and Leadership Award and was recently elected Chair of the 2018 international Fibroblast Growth Factors in Development and Disease Gordon Conference. Dr. Hurley has also served as a permanent member of several NIH study section review panels.

Dr. Hurley is the Associate Dean for the Health Career Opportunity Programs and Founding Director of the Aetna Health Professions Partnership Initiative at UConn Health. This initiative, which began in 1996 as one of the 10 original medical school programs funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in response to the AAMC Project 3000 by 2000, is a consortium of several Connecticut partner colleges/universities and an urban school system designed to increase the awareness and preparedness of students from groups traditionally underepresented in the health professions.

At the local level, Dr. Hurley has presented to the Connecticut legislature and the Governor’s Office for Workforce Development on the UConn Health Professions Partnership Initiative as a successful model of Connecticut Career Choices. In 2007, she was appointed to the Connecticut State Department of Education and the Department of Higher Education College Ready Advisory Subcommittee of the Higher Education PK-16 Council. In recognition of her contributions to educational diversity, Dr. Hurley has received numerous awards including the first New England Board of Higher Education Award for innovation and excellence in higher education; the West Indian Foundation Community Service Award; the Community Service Award from the Capital Area Health Consortium; and the Distinguished Service Award from the Foundation for Educa-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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tional Achievement at Central Connecticut State University. She was also appointed Commissioner and served on the Connecticut Legislative Commission on Health Equity.

At the National level, Dr. Hurley served as Chair of the Women’s Affairs Committee of the American Dental Education Association and was an invited speaker/panelist at The Sullivan Alliance National Leadership Symposium on Health Professions Diversity. Dr. Hurley was recently appointed to the Oversight Committee of NIH, NIDDK Network of Minority Health Research Investigators, and serves as UConn School of Medicine liaison to the AAMC Group on Women in Medicine and Science.

Camara Phyllis Jones, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., is Senior Fellow at the Satcher Health Leadership Institute and Cardiovascular Research Institute and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine at the Morehouse School of Medicine. Previously, she was research director on social determinants of health and equity in the Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Jones received her B.A. degree (molecular biology) from Wellesley College, her M.D. from the Stanford University School of Medicine, and both her M.P.H. and Ph.D. (epidemiology) degrees from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. She also completed residency training in general preventive medicine (Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland) and in family practice (Residency Program in Social Medicine, Bronx, New York).

Dr. Jones is a family physician and epidemiologist whose work focuses on the impact of racism on the health and well-being of the nation. She seeks to broaden the national health debate to include not only universal access to high-quality health care but also attention to the social determinants of health (including poverty) and the social determinants of equity (including racism). As a methodologist, she has developed new ways for comparing full distributions of data (rather than means or proportions) in order to investigate population-level risk factors and propose population-level interventions. As a social epidemiologist, her work on race-associated differences in health outcomes goes beyond documenting those differences to vigorously investigating the structural causes of the differences. As a teacher, her allegories on race and racism illuminate topics that are otherwise difficult for many Americans to understand or discuss.

Darrell G. Kirch, M.D., is President and Chief Executive Officer of the AAMC. A distinguished physician, educator, and medical scientist, Dr. Kirch speaks and publishes widely on the need for transformation in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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the nation’s health care system and how academic medicine can lead change across medical education, biomedical research, and patient care. His career spans all aspects of academic medicine and includes leadership positions at two medical schools and academic health systems, as well as at the NIH.

Before becoming AAMC president, Dr. Kirch was selected as chair-elect of the association, and cochaired the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, the accreditation body for medical schools. He also has served as chair of the AAMC Council of Deans Administrative Board and chair of the American Medical Association Section on Medical Schools.

Dr. Kirch assumed the position of AAMC president in July 2006 following 6 years as Senior Vice President for Health Affairs, dean of the college of medicine, and Chief Executive Officer of the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center at The Pennsylvania State University, where he and his leadership team are credited with revitalizing the institution and guiding it through a period of educational innovation and major growth in clinical activity and research funding. Before joining Penn State, Dr. Kirch held a number of leadership positions at the Medical College of Georgia from 1994 to 2000, including serving as dean of the medical school, senior vice president for clinical activities, and dean of the school of graduate studies.

As a psychiatrist and neuroscientist, Dr. Kirch conducted research on the biological basis of and clinical treatments for severe neuropsychiatric disorders. Following the completion of his residency training at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, he joined the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in Bethesda, Maryland, where he was named acting scientific director in 1993. His NIMH contributions were recognized when he was presented with the Outstanding Service Medal of the U.S. Public Health Service.

Dr. Kirch is a member of several professional societies, including the American Psychiatric Association, American College of Psychiatrists, and American Medical Association, and he currently serves as chair of the Washington Higher Education Secretariat. He was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2007. In 2014, he was named a Distinguished Life Fellow by the American Psychiatric Association.

Michael G. Knight, M.D., MSHP, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Patient Safety Officer for the Division of General Internal Medicine of the GW Medical Faculty Associates. Dr. Knight completed undergraduate studies at Oakwood University, and obtained his Medical Degree with Special Qualifications in Biomedical Research from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University. During medical school, he participated in the year-long Clinical Research Training Program at the NIH, where his research focused on metabolic disease

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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and obesity in women of African descent. He then completed residency in internal medicine, with special training in obesity medicine, at New York Presbyterian–Weill Cornell Medical Center.

He continued his training at the University of Pennsylvania as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar and Fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. While there, he completed a master’s in health policy research, received training in LEAN Six Sigma, and led quality improvement and patient safety efforts in patient and provider communication, adverse event review, and transitions of care. He continued his training as a visiting fellow at The Joint Commission, where he focused on culture of safety development and sentinel event review.

While at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Knight also practiced clinically as an attending in internal medicine at the Crescenz VA Medical Center, and served as the clinical director for the MOVE! Level 3 Weight Management Program. In this role, he led a multidisciplinary team to provide medical weight management through nutrition, physical activity, and medication management. He also practiced clinically in general internal medicine, and focused on preventive medicine, chronic disease management, and coordination of care. Dr. Knight is board certified in internal medicine, and practices clinically with a focus in obesity medicine in the GW Weight Management Clinic and General Internal Medicine Practice.

Walter J. Lanier, J.D., is the Director of Multicultural Affairs and Community Engagement at Milwaukee Area Technical College (MATC), a multicampus community college with approximately 38,000 students. In 2015, Mr. Lanier led the design and launch of the college’s Men of Color Initiative, which is designed to increase course completion, retention, and graduation rates of the college’s men of color. Men of color are more than 22 percent of MATC’s population; Black men are 56 percent of that total.

In addition to his work at MATC, Mr. Lanier is in his sixth year as the senior pastor of the Progressive Baptist Church of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Progressive is very active in the Milwaukee community and is particularly recognized for its work in the areas of mental health, antiviolence, and HIV/AIDS prevention. In 2012, he formed “MIRACLE” (Mental Illness—Raising Awareness with Church and Community Leaders Everywhere), a collaboration of faith-based leaders, community leaders, and people with lived experience.

A 1995 graduate of the University of Michigan law school, Mr. Lanier maintained his own business law practice for over a decade prior to joining MATC. Mr. Lanier also lectured in the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Department of Africology in the areas of race and constitutional law.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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He has served on numerous boards and is deeply committed to being a part of Milwaukee reaching its fullest potential. Mr. Lanier currently serves on a variety of community-wide boards including the Milwaukee County Mental Health Board, Milwaukee Community Justice Council, Milwaukee Inner City Congregations Allied for Hope, and Milwaukee Health Services, Inc.

Cato T. Laurencin, M.D., Ph.D., is a designated University Professor at the University of Connecticut (UConn). He is the Albert and Wilda Van Dusen Distinguished Endowed Chair Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery in the School of Medicine. In addition, Dr. Laurencin is a tenured member of the faculty in the School of Engineering and is Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Professor of Materials Engineering, and Professor of Biomedical Engineering at UConn. Dr. Laurencin serves as Chief Executive Officer of the Connecticut Institute for Clinical and Translational Science, UConn’s cross-university translational science institute. In addition, he is the Founding Director of the Institute for Regenerative Engineering and the Founding Director of The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Center for Biomedical, Biological, Physical, and Engineering Sciences at UConn Health.

Dr. Laurencin is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Dr. Laurencin previously served as the UConn Health Center’s Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of the UConn School of Medicine. Prior to that Dr. Laurencin was the Lillian T. Pratt Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Virginia, as well as the Orthopedic Surgeon-in-Chief at the University of Virginia Health System. In addition, he was designated as a University Professor at the University of Virginia by the President and held professorships in biomedical engineering and chemical engineering.

Dr. Laurencin earned his undergraduate degree in chemical engineering from Princeton University and his medical degree, magna cum laude, from the Harvard Medical School. During medical school, he also earned his Ph.D. in biochemical engineering/biotechnology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

An expert in shoulder and knee surgery, Dr. Laurencin has been named to America’s Top Doctors, and America’s Top Surgeons. He is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, and is one of few orthopedic surgeons elected to the American Surgical Association. He is the winner of the Nicolas Andry Award from the Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons.

Dr. Laurencin’s research involves tissue engineering, biomaterials science, nanotechnology and stem cell science, and a new field he terms

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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regenerative engineering. He is an International Fellow in Biomaterials Science and Engineering and a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and a Fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society. His work was honored by Scientific American Magazine as one of the 50 greatest achievements in science in 2007. Dr. Laurencin was named the 2009 winner of the Pierre Galletti Award, Medical and Institute of Chemical Engineers at its centennial celebration. Dr. Laurencin is active in technology development. In 2012 his work in musculoskeletal tissue regeneration was featured in National Geographic Magazine’s “100 Discoveries that Changed Our World” edition. In addition, he received the Technology, Innovation, and Development Award from the Society for Biomaterials in 2013 for key scientific and technical innovation and leadership in translational research.

Dr. Laurencin’s work in mentoring students is well known. He received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring in ceremonies at the White House in 2010 and the Beckman Award for Mentoring in 2012. Most recently Dr. Laurencin was honored by the AAAS, receiving the AAAS Mentor Award.

Dr. Laurencin has lectured throughout the world on clinical orthopedic surgery and musculoskeletal research. He is an elected member of the Third World Academy of Sciences, and an elected member of the African Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Laurencin is active in science and health policy. He has been a member of the National Science Foundation’s Advisory Committee for Engineering and has served both on the National Science Board of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the National Advisory Council for Arthritis, Musculoskeletal, and Skin Diseases at the NIH. Dr. Laurencin is currently a member of the National Academies’ Board on Life Sciences, and the National Academies’ Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences. He currently holds appointments by the Secretary of Health and Human Services to the National Advisory Council for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, and the Advisory Committee to the Director of the NIH.

John Lumpkin, M.D., M.P.H., is senior vice president for programs at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, where he is responsible for the Foundation’s efforts aimed at transforming health and health care systems, ensuring that everyone has access to stable and affordable health care coverage, building leadership, and engaging business toward building a culture of health in the United States. These efforts help to catalyze fundamental changes in health and health care systems to achieve measurably better outcomes for all by maintaining high-quality, effective, and value-laden health care, public health, and population health services. Before

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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joining the Foundation in April 2003, Dr. Lumpkin served as director of the Illinois Department of Public Health for 12 years. During his more than 17 years with the department, he served as acting director and prior to that as associate director.

Dr. Lumpkin has participated directly in the health and health care system, first practicing emergency medicine and teaching medical students and residents at The University of Chicago and Northwestern University. He is the past chairman of the board of directors of the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, the major teaching hospital of Rutgers University in New Brunswick. After earning his M.P.H. in 1985, he began caring for the more than 12 million people of Illinois as the first African American director of the state public health agency with more than 1,300 employees in seven regional offices, three laboratories, and locations in Springfield and Chicago. He led improvements to programs dealing with women’s and men’s health, information and technology, emergency and bioterrorism preparedness, infectious disease prevention and control, immunization, local health department coverage, and the state’s laboratory services.

Dr. Lumpkin is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, American College of Emergency Physicians, and American College of Medical Informatics. He has been chairman of the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics, and served on the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Council on Maternal, Infant, and Fetal Nutrition; the advisory committee to the director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Assuring the Health of the Public in the 21st Century. He has served on the boards of directors for the Public Health Foundation and National Quality Forum, as president of the Illinois College of Emergency Physicians and the Society of Teachers of Emergency Medicine, and as speaker and board of directors’ member of the American College of Emergency Physicians. He has received the Arthur McCormack Excellence and Dedication in Public Health Award from the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, the Jonas Salk Health Leadership Award, and the Leadership in Public Health Award from the Illinois Public Health Association. Dr. Lumpkin also has been the recipient of the Bill B. Smiley Award, Alan Donaldson Award, African American History Maker, and Public Health Worker of the Year of the Illinois Public Health Association. He is the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters.

Dr. Lumpkin earned his M.D. and B.M.S. degrees from Northwestern University Medical School and his M.P.H. from the University of Illinois School of Public Health. He was the first African American trained in emergency medicine in the country after completing his residency at The

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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University of Chicago. He has served on the faculty of The University of Chicago, Northwestern University, and University of Illinois at Chicago.

Veronica T. Mallett, M.D., M.M.M., is Senior Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of the School of Medicine at Meharry Medical College. In her role as Senior Vice President for Health Affairs, Dr. Mallett is responsible for the quality of health care provided at Meharry and for the maintenance of the health service affiliations that help the College provide exemplary training for its students, residents, and fellows.

As Dean of the School of Medicine, she serves as the chief academic and administrative officer of the medical school and oversees its academic programs, research efforts, curriculum, student affairs, and fiscal management. Dr. Mallett is also responsible for the academic component of residency programs.

Dr. Mallett has been recognized nationally and internationally for her work in the treatment of urinary incontinence and genital organ prolapse as well as her efforts to reduce health disparities. She joined Meharry from the Paul L. Foster School of Medicine at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso where she served as founding chair and professor since March 2011. Prior to this position, she held faculty positions at Northwestern University, Wayne State University, and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, serving in roles including Urogynecology Fellowship Director, Residency Director, Director of Health Care Excellence and Safety, Practice Plan Director, and Department Chair.

In addition to her impressive work as a researcher and educator, Dr. Mallett has made amazing strides in bettering health for people of Hispanic origin. Fluent in medical Spanish, she recently worked to develop a new medical school and health science center on the Texas/Mexico border aimed at addressing the critical physician shortage in El Paso and the surrounding community.

Dr. Mallett obtained her bachelor’s degree in biology from Barnard University and received her M.D. from Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine. She also holds a master’s degree in medical management from Carnegie Mellon University. She is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology, and female pelvic medicine and reconstructive pelvic surgery, and has authored nearly 100 articles, book chapters, and abstracts.

Alfred M. Mays, M.S., is a program officer at the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. Mr. Mays is responsible for managing grant competitions in science education and diversity of science. He also works closely with the North Carolina (NC) Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education Center. Prior to Alfred assuming this role, he served as an independent consultant

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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with a service delivery that included strategic planning, project incubation, design, and implementation of a number initiatives within education agencies and organizations. Mr. Mays was the founder of EdSync Strategies, Inc., an education contract service that provided assistance to NC eLearning Commission, NC STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Learning Network, rural NC public school systems, and the Public School Forum. From 2007 to 2011, he served as the assistant director of the Collaborative Project, an initiative that “sought to strengthen participating school systems serving low-income students in rural areas of the state.” Mr. Mays has also worked with the University of North Carolina General Administration, serving as the director of information resources and director of special projects. Mr. Mays received his B.S. from Wilmington College and M.S. in administration from Central Michigan University. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1984 to 1994, providing information system and data management support for various Air Force missions.

J. Michael McGinnis, M.D., M.P.P., a physician and epidemiologist, serves at the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) as Senior Scholar, Leonard D. Schaeffer Executive Officer, Executive Director of the Leadership Consortium for a Value & Science-Driven Health System and the NAM Learning Health System Initiative. He is also an elected member of the NAM (1999). Previously, Dr. McGinnis was Senior Vice President and head of the Health Group at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (1999–2005). Before that, he served as Assistant Surgeon General and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, with continuous leadership responsibility from 1977 to 1995 for federal activities in disease prevention and health promotion, a tenure unusual for political and policy posts. Chair and founder of various national efforts, key programs developed and launched at his initiative include the Healthy People national goals and objectives, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, each still ongoing. Internationally, he worked in India as state director for the WHO smallpox eradication program (1974–1975), and in Bosnia as Chair of the World Bank/European Commission Task Force for reconstruction in health and human services (1995–1996). Dr. McGinnis’s scientific interests focus on population health and the determinants of health, his publications include approximately 200 articles and more than 20 edited books, and among his national recognitions are the public health Distinguished Service Medal (1989), Health Leader of the Year Award (1996), and Public Health Hero Award (2013). His degrees are from Berkeley (1966), UCLA (1971), and Harvard (1977); he was commencement speaker at each.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Roger A. Mitchell, Jr., M.D., is the Chief Medical Examiner for the Distirct of Columbia. Dr. Mitchell is board certified in anatomic and forensic pathology by the American Board of Pathology. He is a Fellow with the American Society of Clinical Pathology (FASCP) and the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME). Dr. Mitchell sits on national subcommittees for NAME including Education & Planning and Strategic Planning.

He is a graduate of Howard University and UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School. Dr. Mitchell is licensed to practice medicine in New Jersey and Washington, DC. He has performed more than 1,300 autopsy examinations in his career and has testified as an expert on numerous cases. He began the study of forensic science and violence prevention as a Forensic Biologist for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)–DNA Unit in January 1997 at the FBI Headquarters Building.

Dr. Mitchell served 4 years as the Assistant Deputy Chief Medical Examiner, in charge of Medicolegal Death Investigations, at the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences prior to serving 2 years as the Regional Medical Examiner for the Northern Regional Medical Examiner Office in Newark, New Jersey. Dr. Mitchell has served in large cities such as New York City, Houston, and Newark.

Dr. Mitchell has great interest in violence as a public health issue. He believes the medical examiner serves a critical role in public health prevention initiatives and continues to be at the forefront of issues relating to elder abuse and neglect and youth violence. He is recently published for his work on “Forensic Markers Associated with a History of Elder Mistreatment and Self Neglect” in the Academic Forensic Pathology journal.

Valerie Montgomery Rice, M.D., provides a valuable combination of experience at the highest levels of patient care and medical research, as well as organizational management and public health policy. Marrying her management skills and strategic thinking to tackle challenging problems, she has a track record of redesigning complex organizations’ management infrastructures to reflect the needs of evolving strategic environments and position the organization for success.

The sixth president of Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) and the first woman to lead the free-standing medical institution, Dr. Montgomery Rice serves as both the president and dean. A renowned infertility specialist and researcher, she most recently served as dean and executive vice president of MSM, where she served since 2011.

Prior to joining MSM, Dr. Montgomery Rice held faculty positions and leadership roles at various health centers, including academic health centers. Most notably, she was the founding director of the Center for Women’s Health Research at Meharry Medical College, one of the nation’s

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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first research centers devoted to studying diseases that disproportionately impact women of color.

Dedicated to the creation and advancement of health equity, Dr. Montgomery Rice lends her vast experience and talents to programs that enhance pipeline opportunities for academically diverse students, diversifies the physician and scientific workforce, and fosters equity in health care access and health outcomes. To this end she holds membership in many organizations and boards, such as the National Academy of Medicine (2016–present), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (2016–present), Board of Directors for Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine (2016–present), Board of Directors for the Nemours Foundation (2016–present), The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation (2017–present), and the Association of American Medical Colleges Council of Deans.

Dr. Montgomery Rice has received numerous accolades and honors. She was named to the Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans and a recipient of the 2017 Horatio Alger Award. For 2 consecutive years (2016, 2017) Georgia Trend Magazine selected Dr. Montgomery Rice as one of the 100 Most Influential Georgians. Other honors include the Trumpet Vanguard Award (2015); the Dorothy Heights Crystal Stair Award (2014); National Coalition of 100 Black Women–Women of Impact (2014); YWCA–Women of Achievement (Atlanta in 2014 and Nashville in 2007); American Medical Women’s Association Elizabeth Blackwell Medal (2011); and Working Mother Media Multicultural Women’s Legacy Award (2011).

A Georgia native, Dr. Montgomery Rice holds a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a medical degree from Harvard Medical School. She completed her residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University School of Medicine and her fellowship in reproductive endocrinology and infertility at Hutzel Hospital in Detroit, Michigan.

Randall C. Morgan, Jr., M.D., M.B.A., is the Executive Director of the W. Montague Cobb/NMA Health Institute and an orthopedic surgeon who practices in Sarasota and Bradenton, Florida. After serving as founder and President of University Park Orthopedics in that community, he has become a partner in the Sarasota Orthopedic Associates. Dr. Morgan served as the 95th President of the National Medical Association during the years 1996 and 1997. He was the first board-certified orthopedic surgeon to hold that position. Dr. Morgan is a true pioneer in his profession and was among the first surgeons to perform total joint replacement surgery at Northwestern University.

Dr. Morgan has practiced medicine in Evanston, Illinois, and well as in his hometown of Gary, Indiana, for more than 30 years prior to his

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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relocation to Sarasota. With the assistance of his father, Mr. Randall C. Morgan, Sr., he founded the Orthopedic Centers of Northwest Indiana and served as its president from 1975 to 1999. At one time, this was the largest minority-owned orthopedic practice in the United States. He is a Diplomat of the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery and the American Board of Managed Care Medicine. He is also a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons.

James L. Moore III, Ph.D., is the Interim Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer at The Ohio State University, where he is also the College of Education and Human Ecology Distinguished Professor of Urban Education in the College of Education and Human Ecology and inaugural executive director of the Todd Anthony Bell National Resource Center on the African American Male. From 2011 to 2015, he was an associate provost for Diversity and Inclusion, where he managed numerous programs and units, including the Morrill Scholarship Program, Office of Diversity and Inclusion Scholars Program, Young Scholars Program, Upward Bound of Columbus, Upward Bound of Wooster, Community Outreach, Todd Anthony Bell National Resource Center on the African American Male, and Administration/Special Programs.

Dr. Moore received his B.A. in English education from Delaware State University and earned both his M.A.Ed. and Ph.D. in counselor education from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (a.k.a., Virginia Tech). As a scholar, he has a national- and international-recognized research agenda that focuses on the following: (a) how educational professionals, such as school counselors, influence the educational/career aspirations and school experiences of students of color (particularly African American males); (b) sociocultural, familial, school, and community factors that support, enhance, and impede academic outcomes for preK–12 African American students (e.g., elementary, secondary, and postsecondary); (c) recruitment and retention issues of students of color, particularly African Americans, in preK–12 gifted education and those high-potential college students in STEM majors; and (d) social, emotional, and psychological consequences of racial oppression for African American males and other people of color in various domains in society (e.g., education, counseling, workplace, athletics).

Since beginning his professional career as an academic, Dr. Moore has made significant contributions to the fields of school counseling, gifted education, urban education, multicultural counseling/education, higher education, and STEM education. More specifically, he has published over 100 refereed articles, editor-reviewed articles, book chapters, special theme issues, and so on.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Marc A. Nivet, Ed.D., M.B.A., is the Executive Vice President for Institutional Advancement at UT Southwestern Medical Center, where he provides strategic vision and oversight in coordinating the areas of development; communications, marketing, and public affairs; government affairs; and community and corporate relations. Prior to his role at UT Southwestern, Dr. Nivet served as a member of the executive leadership team of the AAMC, where he provided leadership on issues surrounding community engagement, diversity, and health equity at medical schools and teaching hospitals across the United States and Canada.

Prior to his position at the AAMC, Dr. Nivet served from 2005 to 2010 as the Chief Operating Officer and Treasurer of The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation in New York, a national foundation focused on the education of health professionals. He concurrently served from 2008 to 2010 as Special Assistant to the Senior Vice President of Health at New York University, and held earlier positions involved in program planning and evaluation, financial management, grant development and review, media relations, and issues of access and diversity in medical school admissions.

Dr. Nivet earned his doctoral degree in higher education management from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.B.A. with a focus on health care management from The George Washington University’s School of Business. He has a bachelor of science degree in communication studies from Southern Connecticut State University. He is a fellow of The New York Academy of Medicine, and a former President of the National Association of Medical Minority Educators.

Elizabeth Ofili, M.D., is Professor of Medicine and Director and Senior Associate Dean, Clinical Research Center and Clinical and Translational Research, at the Morehouse School of Medicine. She is a national and internationally recognized clinician scientist with particular focus on cardiovascular disparities and women’s health. Dr. Ofili has been continuously funded by the NIH and industry/foundations since 1994, with a track record in clinical trials that impact health disparities. In 2002, as president of the Association of Black Cardiologists, she led the initiative to implement the landmark African American Heart Failure Trial, whose findings led to a change in practice guidelines for the treatment of heart failure in African Americans.

Over the past 17 years, she has led the growth of the clinical research infrastructure and training programs at Morehouse School of Medicine with awards totaling more than $150 million, including serving as the founding director of the U54 center of clinical research excellence, the community physicians network, the U54 Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) Center of Excellence for Clinical and Translational Research, and the R25 clinical research education and career development

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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program. Dr. Ofili has mentored more than 30 M.D. and Ph.D. clinical and translational science investigators, many of whom remain at MSM. She has mentored more than 25 underrepresented minority STEM undergraduates and high school students through funding from NASA and the Minority Biomedical Research Students program.

She is the senior co-PI of the Atlanta Clinical and Translational Science Institute (ACTSI), a citywide collaborative Clinical and Translational Science Awards program at Emory University, Morehouse School of Medicine, and Georgia Institute of Technology, along with their partnering health systems and statewide research organizations. Since 2007, ACTSI has engaged more than 673 investigators, and 134 postdoctoral and predoctoral trainees in discovery science, training, and community engagement. Dr. Ofili has led successful multi-institutional collaborations through the ACTSI and the RCMI Translational Research Network of 18 historically Black, Hispanic, and Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) across the nation, and was lead author of a publication on models of partnerships between HBCUs/MSIs and research intensive institutions.

Dr. Ofili holds a patent for “A system and method for chronic illness care,” and is the recipient of more than 20 national and international awards, including the 2003 National Library of Medicine’s “Changing the Face of Medicine, the Rise of America’s Women,” the Daniel Savage Memorial Science Award from the Association of Black Cardiologists, America’s Top Doctors by Black Enterprise Magazine, and 100 Most influential health care leaders by Atlanta Business Chronicle.

She has delivered more than 600 scientific presentations and published more than 130 scientific papers in national and international journals. As an AAMC 2007 Council of Dean Fellow, Dr. Ofili led a project on best practices to sustaining the biomedical and physician workforce. She has advised the NIH on diversity in the biomedical research workforce, and currently serves on the Advisory Board of the National Clinical Center (NIH), and on the AAMC advisory panel on research. She is an elected member of the Association of University Cardiologists, and is on the board of directors of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute.

William F. Owen, Jr., M.D., FACP, is Dean and Chancellor of Ross University School of Medicine (Ross). He is an accomplished medical academician, experienced clinician, highly respected scientific researcher, and a leader in global health sciences education. Immediately prior to joining Ross, Dr. Owen was the Dean of Medical Sciences at American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine (AUC), a sister medical school within Adtalem Global Education.

A native of Memphis, Tennessee, Dr. Owen is a graduate of Phillips Academy and Brown University. He earned his M.D. with high honors

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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from Tufts University School of Medicine in 1980, and trained in internal medicine and nephrology at Harvard Medical School’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where he was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Fellow in the Minority Medical Faculty Development Program. At Harvard he was a full-time faculty member, and later went on to serve as a tenured professor at three institutions—Duke University, the University of Tennessee, and AUC. He was a Visiting Professor at Imperial College London in its Institute of Global Health Innovation, and at the National University of Singapore.

In a stellar career that has included many firsts, Dr. Owen served as the first African American Chancellor and Senior Vice President of Health Affairs at the University of Tennessee, where he led the College of Medicine and five other health professions colleges. He then served for 5 years as President of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, the statewide health education and medical services component of Rutgers University, the largest publicly funded academic health system in the United States. In this role Dr. Owen was responsible for two allopathic medical schools and an osteopathic medical school, as well as colleges of nursing, public health, allied health, dentistry, graduate medical sciences, and several large magnet teaching hospitals and research institutes.

In 2012 he was appointed the inaugural Chief Executive Officer of Sidra Medical and Research Center in Qatar, the major international training site for Weill Cornell Medical College. He was also the inaugural health policy advisor to the President of the International Association of University Presidents, a nongovernmental organization that advises the United Nations on matters of higher education.

The recipient of numerous accolades and awards, Dr. Owen has been honored in the Congressional Record, featured in Ebony Magazine, and listed in several Who’s Who publications, among others. He has received approximately $10 million in biomedical research grants and has more than 180 peer-reviewed articles, chapters, and books to his credit. In 2006 Dr. Owen was an inventor on a federal patent issued for “Methods and compositions for detection of microbial contaminants in peritoneal dialysis solutions.”

Luis Padilla, M.D., FAAFP, is the Associate Administrator for Health Workforce at the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). He also serves as director of the National Health Service Corps (NHSC). HRSA is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Prior to joining the Bureau of Health Workforce at HRSA, Dr. Padilla was senior health policy advisor to the Chief Executive Officer of Unity Health Care in Washington, DC, a federally qualified health center network with more than 100,000 patients. He also served as Unity’s

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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research director and sought academic partnerships with an emphasis on community-based participatory research. A committed advocate for the underserved, Dr. Padilla is a former NHSC Scholar who completed his service at Upper Cardozo Health Center, where he became the medical director. He was also appointed to the National Advisory Council of the NHSC from 2007 to 2010. A board-certified family physician, Dr. Padilla received a B.A. in philosophy and a B.S. in biology from the University of California, Irvine. He earned his medical degree from Wake Forest School of Medicine and completed his family medicine residency at Brown University.

Vivian Pinn, M.D., was the first full-time Director of the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health, an appointment she held since 1991 and as NIH Associate Director for Research on Women’s Health since 1994 prior to her retirement in August 2011. Since her retirement, she has been named as a Senior Scientist Emerita at the NIH Fogarty International Center. Dr. Pinn came to NIH from Howard University College of Medicine in Washington, DC, where she had been Professor and Chair of the Department of Pathology from 1982 until 1991. Dr. Pinn had previously held teaching appointments at Harvard Medical School and Tufts University where she was also Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. A special tribute by Senator Olympia Snowe on Dr. Pinn’s retirement was published in the Congressional Record in November 2011 commending her contributions during her NIH tenure. The Association of American Medical Colleges awarded her a Special Recognition Award for exceptional leadership over a 40-year career.

She has received numerous honors and recognitions, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 1995. A graduate and Alumna Achievement Award recipient as well as former Trustee of Wellesley College, she earned her M.D. from the University of Virginia School of Medicine, the only woman or minority in her class. She completed her postgraduate training in pathology at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Pinn has received 14 honorary degrees of science, law, and medicine, and the University of Virginia School of Medicine has named one of its four advisory medical student colleges as “The Pinn College” in her honor. Tufts University School of Medicine in 2011 announced the “The Vivian W. Pinn Office of Student Affairs,” named for her at the time her former medical students dedicated a scholarship in her name. She has held leadership positions in many professional organizations, including President of the National Medical Association (NMA), and is currently Chair of the NMA Past Presidents Council. Dr. Pinn currently serves on the Board of Trustees/Advisors of Thomas Jefferson University and Tufts University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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School of Medicine. She was recently elected to Modern Healthcare’s Hall of Fame, the first African American woman to be so honored, and received the Outstanding Woman Leader in Healthcare Award from the University of Michigan.

Wizdom Powell, Ph.D., is Director of the Health Disparities Institute and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at UConn Health. Formerly, Dr. Powell was Associate Professor of Health Behavior at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill’s Gillings School of Global Public Health, and Research Associate Professor in UNC’s Department of Social Medicine. Dr. Powell also served as Associate Director of the Center for Health Equity Research, faculty member at UNC’s Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Director of the UNC’s Men’s Health Research Lab.

In 2011–2012, she was appointed by President Obama to serve as a White House Fellow to Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta. In this role she provided subject matter expertise on military mental health (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder, suicide, and military sexual trauma). Her community-based research focuses on of the role of modern racism and gender norms on African American male health outcomes and health care inequities. She has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, including ones in the American Journal of Public Health, Journal of General Internal Medicine, Behavioral Medicine, and Child Development.

In addition to being a White House Fellow, she is an American Psychological Association (APA) Minority, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Kaiser Permanente Burch, Institute of African American Research, and Ford Foundation Fellow who received a Ph.D. and an M.S. in clinical psychology and an M.P.H. from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She serves as chair of the APA’s workgroup on Health Disparities in Boys and Men and cochair of the Health Committee for President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper Initiative in Durham County.

In recognition of her public service to boys and men, she received the American Psychological Association’s (D51) Distinguished Professional Service Award. In 2015, she received the prestigious Phillip and Ruth Hettleman Prize for Outstanding Artistic and Scholarly Achievement by Young Faculty. Dr. Powell was awarded a 2017 academic writing residency at the Bellagio Center from the Rockefeller Foundation. During this highly competitive residency, Dr. Powell will work with other global leaders on strategies for transforming social and health care system landscapes to address gendered health inequities among vulnerable males. Most recently, she was selected as a Health Innovator Fellow by the Aspen Institute.

Deborah Prothrow-Stith, M.D., is Dean and Professor of Medicine for the College of Medicine at the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Science in Los Angeles. Prior to her joing Drew University, Dr. Prothrow-Stith was a consultant at Spencer Stuart for executive searches for public health and health care services organizations and health professional associations. Previously, Dr. Prothrow-Stith served as associate dean and professor of public health practice at the Harvard School of Public Health. She is recognized as one of the creators of a nationwide social movement to prevent violence, and is the coauthor of several books: Deadly Consequences, the first book to present the public health perspective on the topic to a mass audience; Sugar and Spice and No Longer Nice; Murder Is No Accident; and Health Skills for Wellness, a state-of the-art high school health text.

As a board-certified internist, Dr. Prothrow-Stith has extensive clinical experience including service as attending physician at Boston City Hospital and chief of the Adolescent Clinic at Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center. Appointed by the governor, Dr. Prothrow-Stith served as the Massachusetts public health commissioner with responsibility for seven hospitals, 3,500 employees, and a $350 million budget. In that role, she expanded treatment programs for AIDS patients, increased funding for drug rehabilitation, and launched a statewide office to prevent youth violence.

In addition to 10 honorary doctorates, Dr. Prothrow-Stith has received the 1993 World Health Day Award, the 1989 Secretary of Health and Human Service Award, and a presidential appointment to the National Commission on Crime Control and Prevention. In 2003, she was inducted to the National Academy of Medicine, one of academic medicine’s highest achievements. Dr. Prothrow-Stith is a graduate of Spelman College and Harvard Medical School.

Sohi Rastegar, Ph.D.,2 is a Senior Advisor and the Head of the Office of Emerging Frontiers and Multidisciplinary Activities at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), Directorate for Engineering. He joined NSF in November 2003 following 15 years of academic and administrative service at Texas A&M University, Virginia Commonwealth University, and the Johns Hopkins University. He has been an Invited Professor at the Swiss Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland. He earned his B.S. (with highest honors) and M.S. in aerospace engineering, and his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Rastegar has more than 150 scientific publications and presentations and has trained 8 Ph.D. and 14 M.S. students. He is a cofounder of BioTex, Inc., a medical device company in Houston, Texas. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, a Fellow of the American Society for Lasers in Medicine and Surgery, has served

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2 Sohi Rastegar was unable to attend the meeting.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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as the Chair of Bioengineering Division of American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Associate Editor of Annals of Biomedical Engineering, and a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Biomedical Optics and Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. Dr. Rastegar is the recipient of awards and honors including the Select Young Faculty Award from the Texas Engineering Experiment Station, and the Director’s Superior Accomplishment Award from the National Science Foundation.

Joan Y. Reede, M.D., M.S., M.P.H., M.B.A., is the first Dean for Diversity and Community Partnership, responsible for the development and management of a comprehensive program that provides leadership, guidance, and support to promote the increased recruitment, retention, and advancement of underrepresented minority faculty at Harvard Medical School (HMS). This charge includes oversight of all diversity activities at HMS as they relate to faculty, trainees, students, and staff.

In 1990, Dr. Reede founded the HMS Minority Faculty Development Program and also currently serves as Faculty Director of the Community Outreach programs. In 2008, she became the Director of the Harvard Catalyst Program for Faculty Development and Diversity. In addition, Dr. Reede holds appointments of Professor of Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Health Policy and Associate Director of Leadership Development and Professor of Society and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

In 1989, prior to coming to HMS, Dr. Reede served as the medical director of a Boston community health center, and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Youth Services. She has also worked as a pediatrician in community and academic health centers, juvenile prisons, and public schools.

Dr. Reede created and developed more than 20 programs at HMS that aim to address pipeline and leadership issues for minorities and women who are interested in careers in medicine, academic and scientific research, and the health care professions. Supported by a dedicated staff, she has developed mentoring programs for underrepresented minority students from the middle school through the graduate and medical school levels. She has also designed a training program for middle and high school teachers, developed science curricula for public schools, implemented research and exchange clerkship programs at HMS, and designed and implemented innovative fellowships in minority health policy for physicians, dentists, and doctoral-level mental health professionals.

In collaboration with the Massachusetts Medical Society and the New England Board of Higher Education, Dr. Reede founded the Biomedical Science Careers Program (BSCP). A collaborative, community-based orga-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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nization, BSCP’s scope of involvement includes academia, private industry, medical centers, public education, and professional societies. BSCP’s goal is to identify, support, and provide mentoring for underrepresented minority students, trainees, and professionals pursuing careers in the biomedical and health sciences. Dr. Reede has served on numerous advisory committees and panels at the state and national levels.

Dr. Reede graduated from Brown University and Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She completed a pediatric residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, and a fellowship in child psychiatry at Boston Children’s Hospital. She holds an M.P.H. and an M.S. in health policy management from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and an M.B.A. from Boston University.

David Satcher, M.D., Ph.D.,3 is a physician–scientist and public health administrator with an extensive track record of leadership, research, and community engagement. He is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Morehouse College and holds M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Satcher served as the 16th Surgeon General of the United States (1998–2002) and the 10th Assistant Secretary for Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (1998–2001). He also served as Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dr. Satcher has also held top leadership positions at the Charles R. Drew University for Medicine and Science, Meharry Medical College, and the Morehouse School of Medicine. He has received more than 50 honorary degrees and has received numerous awards from diverse organizations and agencies. Currently, Dr. Satcher is the Founding Director and Senior Advisor for the Satcher Health Leadership Institute at the Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

Louis W. Sullivan, M.D., is the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of The Sullivan Alliance to Transform the Health Professions. He is also chairman of the board of the National Health Museum in Atlanta, Georgia, which aims to improve the health of Americans by enhancing health literacy and advancing healthy behaviors. Dr. Sullivan served as chair of the President’s Commission on Historically Black Colleges and Universities from 2002 to 2009 and was cochair of the President’s Commission on HIV and AIDS from 2001 to 2006. With the exception of his tenure as secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) from 1989 to 1993, Dr. Sullivan was president of Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) for more than two decades.

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3 David Satcher was unable to attend the meeting.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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As Secretary of HHS, Dr. Sullivan’s efforts to improve the health and health behavior of Americans included (1) the introduction of a new and improved FDA food label; (2) release of Healthy People 2000, a guide for improved health promotion/disease prevention activities; (3) education of the public about health dangers from tobacco use; (4) successful efforts to prevent the introduction of “Uptown,” a non-filtered, mentholated cigarette by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company; (5) inauguration of a $100 million minority male health and injury prevention initiative; and (6) implementation of greater gender and ethnic diversity in senior positions of HHS, including the appointment of the first female director of the NIH, the first female and first Hispanic Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service, and the first African American Commissioner of the Social Security Administration.

Hannah Valantine, M.D., M.R.C.P., received her Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (M.B.B.S.; the United Kingdom’s equivalent to an M.D.) from St. George’s Hospital, London University, in 1978. After that, she moved to the University of Hong Kong Medical School for specialty training in elective surgery before returning to the United Kingdom. She was awarded a diploma of membership by the Royal College of Physicians (M.R.C.P.) in 1981. In addition, she completed postgraduate training and numerous fellowships, serving as senior house officer in Cardiology at Brompton Hospital and Registrar in Cardiology and General Medicine at Hammersmith Hospital. In 1985, Dr. Valantine moved to the United States for postdoctoral training in cardiology at Stanford University, and in 1988, she received a Doctor of Science (D.Sc.), Medicine, from London University. Dr. Valantine became a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Cardiology Division at Stanford and rose through the academic ranks to become a full Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Director of Heart Transplantation Research. She came to the NHLBI in 2014 to continue her research while also serving as the first NIH Chief Officer of Scientific Workforce Diversity. Dr. Valantine has received numerous awards throughout her career including a Best Doctor in America honor in 2002. She has authored more than 160 primary research articles and reviews and previously served on the editorial boards of the journals Graft and Ethnicity & Disease. Dr. Valantine is a member of the American College of Cardiology, the American Society of Transplant Physicians, and the American Heart Association, and past President of the American Heart Association Western States Affiliate.

C. Reynold Verret, Ph.D., is the sixth president of Xavier University of Louisiana and the University’s second lay president. Prior to his appointment at Xavier, Dr. Verret served as provost and chief academic offi-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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cer for Savannah State University. He served also as provost at Wilkes University in Pennsylvania and as Dean of the Misher College of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. At these institutions, he led the revisions of general education curricula, oversaw accreditations, developed international programs, established collaborative agreements with neighboring institutions at the K–12 and higher education levels, instituted new state-approved academic programs, promoted interdisciplinary efforts between the humanities and sciences, and planned new facilities. Dr. Verret also served on faculty at Tulane University and also at Clark Atlanta University, where he was chair of the department of chemistry for many years.

As a scientist, Dr. Verret’s research interests have included the cytotoxicity of immune cells, biosensors, and biomarkers. He has published in the fields of biological chemistry and immunology. At the University of the Sciences, he led a faculty effort establishing a knowledge network on social exclusion in support of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health within the World Health Organization.

Throughout, Dr. Verret has worked to enhance student achievement and progression to degree. He has contributed to increasing the number of U.S. students pursuing degrees in STEM disciplines and continuing to advanced study. This has included initiatives to mitigate the shortage of qualified science and math teachers in K–12.

He has served on many professional organizations and advisory bodies, including those of the NIH, the Board of the Pennsylvania Humanities Council, and the Georgia Coastal Indicators Coalition. He has received awards and fellowships for teaching and scholarship.

Dr. Verret received his undergraduate degree cum laude in biochemistry from Columbia University and the Ph.D. in biochemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). To these, were added postdoctoral experiences as fellow at the Howard Hughes Institute for Immunology at Yale and the Center for Cancer Research at MIT.

Adrienne White-Faines, M.P.A., FACHE, serves as Chief Executive Officer of the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), which represents more than 129,000 osteopathic physicians (DOs) and osteopathic medical students. Ms. White-Faines leads the AOA’s strategic agenda, supporting the organization’s physician and student members by promoting public health and advancing research; serving as the accrediting agency for osteopathic medical schools; and provider of physician specialty board certification and continuing medical education.

For 10 years prior to joining the AOA, Ms. White-Faines served as vice president of health initiatives and advocacy at the American Cancer Society, Illinois Division, where she was accountable for cancer research,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
×

education, advocacy, and patient service programs. Prior to employment at the American Cancer Society, she served as chief operating officer at Chicago-based Renwal Emergency Medical Services, a health care management consulting firm for hospitals and physicians, and at Chicago’s Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where she oversaw a $600 million hospital redevelopment project. She also worked as a health strategist with the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, and as a practice administrator for a large physician group practice in Whittier, California.

Ms. White-Faines remains active with numerous Chicago and national nonprofit organizations, including the Erikson Institute, American Field Service-USA, and as a fellow with Leadership Greater Chicago. She holds a master of public administration from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and a bachelor of arts from Amherst (Massachusetts) College.

M. Roy Wilson, M.D., is the 12th president of Wayne State University, where he has realigned the university’s numerous research divisions to emphasize team science and cluster hiring of scientists. This effort was reflected in the organization of the science teams in the $90 million IBio multidisciplinary research facility, which opened in 2015. He also developed a strategy to improve the pipeline of underrepresented students toward science careers. As part of this strategy, he formed a coalition of Detroit-based universities and colleges to launch the NIH-funded Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity Program at the university in 2015. In an effort to increase the diversity of Wayne State’s campus, Dr. Wilson created the position of Associate Provost for Diversity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer in 2014. He also created the Office of Multicultural Student Engagement to provide an inclusive environment and promote awareness initiatives that encourage academic success for underrepresented minorities and historically marginalized students.

Prior to joining Wayne State, Dr. Wilson served as deputy director for strategic scientific planning and program coordination at the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities of the NIH. Previously, he was dean of the School of Medicine and vice president for health sciences at Creighton University, president of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, and concurrently, chancellor of the University of Colorado Denver and chair of the Board of Directors of University of Colorado Hospital. Dr. Wilson also chaired the Board of Directors of the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science and was acting president during part of that time.

Dr. Wilson’s research has focused on glaucoma and blindness in populations from the Caribbean to West Africa. He was elected a lifetime member of the National Academy of Medicine in 2003. He received his

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
×

undergraduate degree from Allegheny College, an M.S. in epidemiology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School.

Additional honors include the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s Senior Achievement Award, the Distinguished Physician Award from the Minority Health Institute, the Herbert W. Nickens Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges, the NIH Director’s Award, and the Cato T. Laurencin Distinguished Research Career Award from the National Medical Association. He received an honorary doctor of humane letters from Allegheny College in 2016.

STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN WORKSHOP

Martin Campbell is a 2nd-year medical student at Morehouse School of Medicine. He attended Morehouse College, where he obtained a bachelor of science degree in biology. He served as the community service cochair for the 1st-year M.D. class and the community service chair for the Christian Medical and Dental Association at Morehouse School of Medicine. Mr. Campbell also served as the 1st-year liaison for the Internal Medicine Interest Group. In Mr. Campbell’s 1st year of medical school, he cofounded Crossroads ministry, which is a student-led organization focused on tailoring to the spiritual growth and health of students through bible studies, community outreach, and fellowship events. This past summer, Mr. Campbell did an intensive 8-week research program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia. As part of his research project, he helped optimize a novel bead-based Luminex multiplex immunoassay for the detection of IgG antibodies against measles and rubella in rhesus macaques while simultaneously optimizing it for use in human serum. He presented his findings before CDC and program faculty, and his efforts have contributed to the global undertaking of eradicating measles and rubella infections worldwide. In addition, Mr. Campbell is an active member of the Student National Medical Association and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Prior to entering medical school, Mr. Campbell lived in College Station, Texas, where he worked at the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab (TVMDL) as an Analytical Chemistry Technician. During his 2 years in that role, he developed a method for simultaneously detecting three isomers of vitamin A and two isomers of vitamin E in animal serum and liver via high performance liquid chromatography. Mr. Campbell also developed a method to detect selenium levels in animal tissue using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and microwave-assisted tissue digestion. While working at TVMDL, Mr. Campbell also worked as a Clinical Laboratory Technician at Baylor Scott and White hospital,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
×

where he became proficient in phlebotomy, specimen processing, urinalysis, and ELISA testing.

Michael Denning is a current 2nd-year undergraduate student at East Carolina University. Currently, he is participating in a combined degree program, and will be graduating next year with a bachelor of science in public health studies and a master of business administration. In addition to being an EC Scholar and Early Assurance in Medicine Scholar to the Brody School of Medicine, he is active in several clubs and organizations on and off campus, all of which focus on promoting equity and equality for minorities, students, and rural community members, especially in the fields of health care, youth development, and educational attainment and preparation.

Gabriel Felix is a 3rd-year medical student at Howard University College of Medicine. He attended Binghamton University in New York, where he received his bachelor of arts in psychology. Prior to medical school he worked at the Kessler Foundation doing research on survivors of traumatic brain injuries and individuals living with disabilities. He currently serves as the National President-elect for the Student National Medical Association and sits as a trustee for the National Medical Association. He hopes to use his position to continue to support medical and premedical students to become culturally competent and socially conscious physicians that advocate for underserved communities.

Ross McMillan is an M.D./Ph.D. candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is from Tallahassee, Florida, and attended Morehouse College, where he earned a bachelor of science degree in biology. He then matriculated to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he joined the lab of Dr. William Matsui. His thesis focused on the characterization and therapeutic targeting of pancreatic cancer stem cells. While at Hopkins, he also served as the Regional Director for Region VI of the Student National Medical Association. He is currently applying for residency into the field of internal medicine and in the future hopes to work as a medical educator, translational researcher, and diversity practitioner.

Abbas Rattani, M.Be., is currently a 3rd-year medical student at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. This past year he served as a Paul Farmer Global Surgery Research Associate with the Program for Global Surgery and Social Change at Harvard Medical School and a Fellow with the Vanderbilt Medical Scholars Program at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He is also a founder and the current director of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
×

the creative arts nonprofit #MIPSTERZ, which has been featured on CNN, CBS, NPR, and The Atlantic. His research interests include neurological diseases, bioethics, Islamic studies, social justice, cost-effectiveness analysis, and health systems research in low- and middle-income countries. He is an alumnus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Pennsylvania.

Khalil Taylor is a graduate student in the Interdisciplinary Health Science program at Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received his B.S. from Villanova University in 2016 and double majored in biology and psychology. He is a Gates Millennium Scholar and intends on obtaining a master’s degree in public health. As a Philadelphia native, Mr. Taylor plans on giving back to his city as a health care provider. He intends on matriculating into medical school after completing his masters in the fall of 2019 with hopes of obtaining an M.D./M.P.H. dual degree. Mr. Taylor has worked as a research assistant for a hospital-based violence intervention program in Philadelphia, Healing Hurt People. The program is designed to reduce recidivism among youth seen in emergency departments for violence-related injuries. During his time with the program, he was introduced to the importance of a trauma-informed approach for ending the cycle of violence. Mr. Taylor is interested in pursuing a career in emergency medicine. He desires to help combat health care issues affecting urban communities.

Robert Wardlow is currently a 6th-year M.D./Ph.D. candidate in the Medical Scientist Training Program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His Ph.D. work, in the laboratory of Hal Dietz, entails studying the genetic underpinnings of hereditary aneurysm disorders such as Marfan syndrome. Mr. Wardlow grew up primarily in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, and graduated in 2012 from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, with a B.S. in biochemistry and molecular biology.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25130.
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An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science: Proceedings of a Joint Workshop Get This Book
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Black men are increasingly underrepresented in medical schools and in the medical profession. A diverse workforce is a key attribute of quality healthcare and research suggests that a diverse workforce may help to advance cultural competency and increase access to high-quality health care, especially for underserved populations. Conversely, lack of diversity in the health workforce threatens health care quality and access and contributes to health disparities. In this way, the growing absence of Black men in medicine is especially troubling, because their absence in medicine may have adverse consequences for health care access, quality, and outcomes among Black Americans and Americans overall.

To better understand the factors that contribute to the low participation of Black men in the medical profession, facilitate discussion of current strategies used to increase their participation in medical education, and explore new strategies along the educational and professional pipeline that may have potential to increase participation in medicine, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and the Cobb Institute jointly convened a 2-day workshop in November 2017, in Washington, DC. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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