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Page 255
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C. Updated Crash Cost Estimates." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidelines for Integrating Safety and Cost-Effectiveness into Resurfacing, Restoration, and Rehabilitation (3R) Projects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25206.
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Page 255
Page 256
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C. Updated Crash Cost Estimates." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidelines for Integrating Safety and Cost-Effectiveness into Resurfacing, Restoration, and Rehabilitation (3R) Projects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25206.
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Page 256
Page 257
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C. Updated Crash Cost Estimates." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Guidelines for Integrating Safety and Cost-Effectiveness into Resurfacing, Restoration, and Rehabilitation (3R) Projects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25206.
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Page 257

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

C-1 Appendix C. Updated Crash Cost Estimates Crash costs are used in benefit-cost analyses to represent the benefits of reducing crashes. The crash cost values, by crash severity level, currently used in the examples presented in this document are as follows:  Fatality (K) $4,008,900  Disabling injury (A) $216,600  Evident injury (B) $79,000  Possible injury (C) $44,900  Property damage only (O) $7,400 These crash cost values represent the comprehensive societal costs of crashes, and are currently used by a number of highway agencies in benefit-cost analyses. These values of crash costs are accepted and used by a number of highway agencies because they are presented in Chapter 7 of the AASHTO Highway Safety Manual (HSM) (2), and the HSM is generally considered an authoritative source. However, many highway agencies use crash costs that differ from these values. The crash cost values in current use by highway agencies range from approximately $1 million per fatality to over $9 million per fatality. On looking further into the HSM crash cost values, however, it is evident that they are in need of updating. The HSM crash cost values are taken from a 2005 FHWA report (31), which it presents crash costs based on 2001 data. The FHWA report also provides a methodology for updating these crash costs to future years. The crash costs used as default values in these guidelines are based on the FHWA report values updated to 2015 levels. The recommended methodology for updating the crash cost values, based on the FHWA report is presented below. This updating procedure is in current use by both the New Hampshire and Ohio Departments of Transportation. Table C-1 shows that the comprehensive societal costs of crashes by severity level for 2001 can be broken down into two components:  human capital cost component  other societal cost component

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TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) has released a pre-publication, non-edited version of Research Report 876: Guidelines for Integrating Safety and Cost-Effectiveness into Resurfacing, Restoration, and Rehabilitation (3R) Projects. The report presents an approach for estimating the cost-effectiveness of including safety and operational improvements in a resurfacing, restoration, or rehabilitation (3R) project. The approach uses the performance of the existing road in estimating the benefits of a proposed design improvement and in determining if it is worthwhile. These guidelines are intended to replace TRB Special Report 214: Designing Safer Roads: Practices for Resurfacing, Restoration, and Rehabilitation. The guidelines are accompanied by two spreadsheet tools available for download through a .zip file: one for analyzing a single design alternative and one for comparing several alternatives or combinations of alternatives.

Disclaimer: This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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