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Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B: List of Webinars and Solicited Expert Input

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Webinars and Solicited Expert Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
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Appendix B

List of Webinars and Solicited Expert Input

Requests for public access to webinar presentations and written materials submitted to the committee may be submitted through the National Academies Projects and Activities Repository.

WEBINARS

  1. Criteria for Determining a Subspecies (October 19, 2018)
    • Susan Haig, U.S. Geological Survey
  2. Understanding Species Hybridization (October 22, 2018)
    • Michael Arnold, University of Georgia—The Role of Hybridization in the Species Evolution
    • Emily Latch, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee—Human and Landscape Influences on Species Hybridization
  3. Red Wolf Genetics and Behavioral Ecology (November 16, 2018)
    • Joseph Hinton, University of Georgia
    • Roland Kays, North Carolina State University
  4. Red Wolf Morphology (November 16, 2018)
    • Ronald M. Nowak, Zoologist (retired)

SOLICITED WRITTEN EXPERT INPUT

  1. Taxonomists/museum curators who provided responses to the committee’s question on the criteria most often deployed in recognizing subspecies:
    • Erik Beever, U.S. Geological Survey (September 19, 2018)
    • James V. Remsen, Louisiana State University; LSU Museum of Natural Science (September 17, 2018)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Webinars and Solicited Expert Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
×
    • Kevin Winker, University of Alaska, Fairbanks; University of Alaska Museum (September 17, 2018)
    • Scott Steppan, Florida State University (October 5, 2018)
    • Link Olson, University of Alaska, Fairbanks; University of Alaska Museum (October 8, 2018)
  1. Experts who responded to committee’s questions about the red wolf:
    • Robert Wayne, University of California, Los Angeles (November 27, 2018)
    • Linda Rutledge, Trent University (December 6, 2018)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Webinars and Solicited Expert Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
×
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: List of Webinars and Solicited Expert Input." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25351.
×
Page 84
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Scientists strive to develop clear rules for naming and grouping living organisms. But taxonomy, the scientific study of biological classification and evolution, is often highly debated. Members of a species, the fundamental unit of taxonomy and evolution, share a common evolutionary history and a common evolutionary path to the future. Yet, it can be difficult to determine whether the evolutionary history or future of a population is sufficiently distinct to designate it as a unique species.

A species is not a fixed entity – the relationship among the members of the same species is only a snapshot of a moment in time. Different populations of the same species can be in different stages in the process of species formation or dissolution. In some cases hybridization and introgression can create enormous challenges in interpreting data on genetic distinctions between groups. Hybridization is far more common in the evolutionary history of many species than previously recognized. As a result, the precise taxonomic status of an organism may be highly debated. This is the current case with the Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) and the red wolf (Canis rufus), and this report assesses the taxonomic status for each.

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