National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth (2019)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff

« Previous: Appendix B: Youth Engagement
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×

Appendix C

Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff

RICHARD J. BONNIE (Chair) is Harrison Foundation professor of law and medicine, professor of public policy, professor of psychiatry and neurobehavioral sciences, and director of the Institute of Law, Psychiatry and Public Policy at the University of Virginia. He teaches and writes about health law and policy, bioethics, criminal law, and public policies relating to mental health, substance abuse, and public health, and has coauthored leading textbooks on criminal law and public health law. Bonnie has chaired numerous studies for the Academies on subjects ranging from elder mistreatment to juvenile justice reform to underage drinking, most recently a study on policies needed to end the opioid epidemic in the United States (2017). He received the Yarmolinsky Medal in 2002 for his contributions to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

ANNA AIZER is a professor of economics at Brown University. A labor and health economist with interests in the area of child health and wellbeing. She is also codirector of the National Bureau of Economic Research’s Program on Children. Her current work considers the mechanisms behind the intergenerational transmission of poverty. In particular, she focuses on the roles played by health insurance and access to medical care, domestic violence, exposure to environmental toxins, the role of stress, and poor children’s greater interaction with the juvenile justice system in explaining why the children of poor mothers are more likely to grow up to be poor themselves. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Princeton University’s Center for Research on Child Wellbeing in 2004. Aizer holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×

MARGARITA ALEGRÍA is chief of the Disparities Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor in the Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Alegría has published widely on the improvement of health care services delivery for diverse racial and ethnic populations, conceptual and methodological issues with multicultural populations, and ways to bring the community’s perspective into the design and implementation of health services. She is currently the principal investigator (PI) of four National Institutes of Health–funded research studies that cover, among other subjects, the impact of Medicaid plans on access to and quality of substance use disorder treatment, community capacity building to prevent disability among minority elders, and causes of racial/ethnic disparities in mental disorders. She is also co-PI on a William T. Grant Foundation grant investigating strategies to reduce behavioral health inequality between adolescents of majority and minority racial/ethnic groups living in four different neighborhoods. Dr. Alegría obtained her Ph.D. in psychology from Temple University.

EMILY P. BACKES is a program officer for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She served as the study director for the Committee on the Neurobiological and Socio-behavioral Science of Adolescent Development and Its Applications. Previously, she served as study director for the report Transforming the Financing of Early Care and Education. In her time at the National Academies, she has provided analytical and editorial support to projects covering a range of topics, including juvenile justice, policing, illicit markets, education and literacy, science communication, and human rights. She holds an M.A. in history from the University of Missouri and a J.D. from the University of the District of Columbia’s David A. Clarke School of Law.

CLAIRE D. BRINDIS is director of the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies and a professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine and the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Health Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She holds the Caldwell B. Esselstyn Chair in Health Policy. She is also codirector of the Adolescent and Young Adult Health National Resource Center and founding director of the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health at UCSF. A native of Argentina, Brindis conducts research addressing child, adolescent, and women’s health policy, the implementation of health care reform and immigration health, and how disparities impact access to quality care, health outcomes, and health insurance coverage. Her work also focuses on program evaluation and the translation of research into policy at the local, state, and national levels. Other research interests

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×

include consumer engagement in health care system redesign, tracking the implementation of the Affordable Care Act on adolescents, young adults, and women, and research on the health and mental health needs of those who are part of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival Program (also known as Dreamers). Throughout these and other projects, Dr. Brindis is committed to closing the gap between evidence-based innovation and its application to policy and programs. She holds a doctoral degree in public health and behavioral sciences from the University of California, Berkeley.

ELIZABETH CAUFFMAN is a professor in the Department of Psychological Science at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), where she also holds courtesy appointments in the School of Education and the School of Law. At the broadest level, Cauffman’s research addresses the intersection between adolescent development and juvenile justice. She has published widely on a range of topics in the study of contemporary adolescence, including adolescent brain development, risk taking and decision making, parent-adolescent relationships, and juvenile justice. Findings from Cauffman’s research were incorporated into the American Psychological Association’s amicus briefs submitted to the U.S. Supreme Court in Roper v. Simmons, which abolished the juvenile death penalty, and in both Graham v. Florida and Miller v. Alabama, which placed limits on the use of life without parole as a sentence for juveniles. As part of her larger efforts to help research inform practice and policy, she served as a member of the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice and currently directs the Center for Psychology and Law at UCI as well as directs the Masters in Legal and Forensic Psychology Program at UCI. Cauffman holds a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Temple University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Center on Adolescence at Stanford University.

TAMMY CHANG is a health services researcher and practicing family physician with a passion for adolescent health, specifically for breaking the cycle of poverty and poor health among adolescent mothers and their children. Her National Institutes of Health–sponsored research is focused on improving access to reproductive health care and promoting healthy pregnancy weight gain among at-risk adolescents using text messaging, social media mining, and natural language processing (NLP). She is also the founding director of MyVoice, a national text-message poll of youth ages 14 to 24 that uses mixed methods and NLP with the goal of informing local and national policies in real time. Chang is a faculty member in the National Clinician Scholars Program, in which she trains junior faculty clinicians and teaches a master’s level course in leadership and communication. She holds an M.D. and an M.P.H. in health policy and management

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×

from the University of Michigan. Chang completed residency training and served as co-chief resident in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan, and is an alumna of the University of Michigan Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program.

MESMIN DESTIN is associate professor at Northwestern University in the School of Education and Social Policy and the Department of Psychology, as well as serving as a fellow of Northwestern’s Institute for Policy Research. Destin directs a multidisciplinary lab group and investigates social psychological mechanisms underlying socioeconomic disparities in educational outcomes during adolescence and young adulthood. Using laboratory and field experiments, he studies factors that influence how young people perceive themselves and pursue their futures. At the university level, he examines how subtle social experiences and institutional messaging shape the motivation and educational trajectories of low-socioeconomic- status and first-generation college students. Destin holds a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Michigan.

ANGELA DIAZ is the Jean C. and James W. Crystal professor in the Department of Pediatrics and the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Diaz is also the director of the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center, which provides young people with comprehensive, interdisciplinary, integrated medical care, as well as sexual and reproductive health, mental health, and dental and optical services. Under her leadership, the center has grown significantly and is a major training site in the field of adolescent health and medicine. She has been a White House Fellow and a member of the Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Advisory Committee. She was formerly a member of the Board of Directors of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. In 2003, she chaired the National Advisory Committee on Children and Terrorism for the Department of Health and Human Services. In 2009, she was appointed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg to the New York City Commission for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning Runaway and Homeless Youth Taskforce. Diaz is active in public policy and advocacy in the United States and has conducted international health projects on several continents. She holds an M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, an M.P.H. from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Columbia University.

MARY GHITELMAN is a senior program assistant for the National Academies’ Board on Children, Youth, and Families and the Committee on Population in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. She has been with the National Academies since April 2015, working on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×

reports including The Integration of Immigrants into American Society; Valuing Climate Damages: Updating Estimation of the Social Cost of Carbon Dioxide; and Transforming the Financing of Early Care and Education. She received her B.A. in psychology from Beloit College and studied abroad in Copenhagen, Denmark, with a focus in cross-cultural psychology.

NANCY E. HILL is the Charles Bigelow professor of education in the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University. Her research focuses on parenting and adolescent development, especially examining issues across ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic status. She studies how parents and other adults can support youth as they engage in school, succeed academically, and hone their goals, aspirations, and sense of purpose. Her current research projects includes a longitudinal study following adolescents across high school, focusing on economically and ethnically diverse youth and their emerging sense of purpose and views of the economy as they influence postsecondary transitions to college and career. She received the William T. Grant Foundation’s Distinguished Faculty Fellowship to support her engagement with the Massachusetts’ Executive Office on Education and the Ernest R. Hilgard Lifetime Achievement Award from APA Division 1 for her contributions to psychology. She currently is the president-elect of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) and has served on the Governing Council and as Secretary of SRCD. In addition, she has chaired the Board of Directors of ChildFund International, an international nongovernmental organization, which uses a developmental framework to better serve and empower disadvantaged children, youth, and families in 25 nations globally. Hill earned her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Michigan State University.

MICHELLE JACKSON is assistant professor of sociology at Stanford University and an associate member of Nuffield College, Oxford. Her main research interests lie in social inequality, social mobility, and the sociology of education. Her research aims to understand how it is that social inequality is produced and reproduced by social institutions. Her work places institutional constraints and incentives at the center of an understanding of intergenerational inequality. Jackson is an editorial board member of American Sociological Review, European Sociological Review, Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, and Social Forces. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Nuffield College, Oxford.

ARLENE F. LEE is the former executive director of the Maryland Governor’s Office for Children, where she chaired the Children’s Cabinet and worked to support the governor’s vision for the well-being of Maryland’s children. Ms. Lee was also the director of policy at the Center for the Study

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×

of Social Policy, where she focused on helping federal and state elected officials develop research-informed policies and funding to improve results for children and families. In this last capacity, she oversaw PolicyforResults. org, a leading national resource for results-based policy. She has served as deputy director of the Georgetown University Center for Juvenile Justice Reform, director of the Federal Resource Center for Children of Prisoners, and youth strategies manager for the Governor’s Office of Crime Control and Prevention. Ms. Lee is also the author of numerous articles. She holds a J.D. from Washington College of Law, American University. As a result of her work, Ms. Lee was named one of Maryland’s Top 100 Women and has received three Governor’s Citations.

LESLIE LEVE is associate director of the Prevention Science Institute, associate director of the Prevention Science graduate programs, and associate vice president for research in the Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation at the University of Oregon. Her research and teaching interests are focused on child and adolescent development and preventive interventions. She leads federal research grants that focus on developmental pathways and intervention outcomes for children and families. This includes preventive intervention studies with youth in foster care and with adolescents in the juvenile justice system aimed at preventing risk behaviors and improving public health outcomes, and adoption studies that examine the interplay between biological (genetic, hormonal), psychological, and social influences on development. Her work also focuses on outcomes for girls and women. Leve holds a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of Oregon.

JENS LUDWIG is the Edwin A. and Betty L. Bergman Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago, director of the University of Chicago Crime Lab, and codirector of the University of Chicago Urban Education Lab. Ludwig also serves as a nonresident senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution, research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), and codirector of the NBER’s working group on the economics of crime. His research focuses on social policy, particularly in the areas of urban poverty, crime, and education, and is recently focusing on ways of using new tools from the field of machine learning combined with the growing availability of large government administrative datasets (‘big data’) to try to make progress on these policy challenges. He is a member of the editorial board of the American Economic Review and is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Ludwig holds both an M.A. and a Ph.D. in economics from Duke University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×

SUSAN VIVIAN MANGOLD is chief executive officer of the Juvenile Law Center. She is professor emeritus at the University at Buffalo School of Law, where she taught for more than 20 years and served as vice dean for academics, with a scholarly focus on children and the law. Mangold also chaired a university-wide initiative on strategic strength in civic engagement and public policy. The author of numerous articles on the child welfare system, she was the primary investigator for a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation study of the impact of different types of funding on long-term outcomes for children in foster care. During her undergraduate years at Harvard University, she founded the Cambridge Youth Enrichment Program (now Summer Urban Program) to offer educational and recreational programs for youth in the summers, and later became program director for Girls Club (now Girls Inc.) in Massachusetts, which provided after-school services to inner-city girls, many of whom were involved in the child welfare and justice systems. This experience led her to Harvard Law School with the intent of becoming a children’s attorney. During law school, she became executive director of Harvard Legal Aid and cofounded the Children’s Rights Project. Upon graduation, she received a Harvard Law School Public Interest Fellowship to work at the Juvenile Law Center, where she worked as a staff attorney for 5 years. She writes and speaks frequently on current issues impacting older youth in the justice and child welfare systems. Mangold holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

BRUCE S. MCEWEN is the Alfred E. Mirsky Professor and head of the Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology at the Rockefeller University in New York. McEwen’s laboratory has carried out groundbreaking research, discovering adrenal steroid receptors and, later, estrogen receptors in the hippocampus, a brain region that mediates memory and mood regulation. These discoveries, now expanded to other brain regions such as amygdala, prefrontal cortex, and nucleus accumbens, showed that circulating stress and sex hormones do more in the brain than just provide feedback to regulate neuroendocrine function, but rather influence cognitive and emotional processes throughout the life course, with major implications for anxiety and depressive disorders. This includes regulating ongoing adaptive remodeling of brain circuits and connections between neurons as well as regulating neurogenesis in the hippocampus of the adult brain. He is past president of the Society for Neuroscience and member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine. He has received many awards, including the Dale Medal of the British Endocrine Society, the Karl Spencer Lashley Award, American Philosophical Society, the Scolnick Prize in Neuroscience from MIT, the Ipsen Foundation Prize in Neuronal Plasticity, the Society for Biological Psychiatry Gold Medal, and the Thomas W. Salmon

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×

Award from the New York Academy of Medicine. McEwen holds a B.A. in chemistry from Oberlin College and a Ph.D. in cell biology from The Rockefeller University.

STEPHANIE OH is an M.D./Ph.D. candidate in the Rutgers University/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/Princeton University Physician-Scientist Program, where she recently finished her Ph.D. in neuroscience and is in the process of completing her M.D. degree. Her thesis work focused on the neuroprotective role of novel-coding mRNA and non-coding microRNAs in Parkinson’s disease. She is a director of the medical school’s student-run free clinic, spearheading efforts to provide free, longitudinal, primary medical care to uninsured patients in the community and leading IRB-approved research projects for novel health care interventions and quality improvement. Prior to her doctoral studies, Oh received her B.Sc. in biological engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, researched molecular mechanisms of neuronal plasticity at Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, and served as an AmeriCorps fellow at Mass Mentoring Partnership, a nonprofit dedicated to improving mentoring programs and youth development organizations.

STEPHEN T. RUSSELL is the Priscilla Pond Flawn Regents Professor in child development in the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences and a faculty member in the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. He studies adolescent development, with an emphasis on adolescent sexuality, LGBT youth, and parent-adolescent relationships. Beginning more than 15 years ago, Russell began a program of research on adolescent sexual orientation, minority stress, and the health and well-being of sexual minorities. He published a series of papers that were the first to document significant health risks among sexual-minority adolescents using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (or Add Health Study). He continues to study health risk and resilience among this population, with an emphasis on gender and cultural differences. In addition, he is an expert in the role of school policies, programs, and practices in supporting adolescent adjustment, achievement, and health. He has been involved in community and professional organizations throughout his career, including as human relations commissioner in Durham, North Carolina; Davis, California; and Tucson, Arizona; and is currently on the Board of Directors of the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. He has been an elected board member of the National Council on Family Relations and is past-president of the Society for Research on Adolescence. Russell holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Duke University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×

DARA SHEFSKA is a research associate on the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She joined the National Academies in 2015 as a research assistant on the Food and Nutrition Board, staffing the Roundtable on Obesity Solutions. In this role, she focused on publications, communications, and coordinating the Early Care and Education Innovation Collaborative. She was awarded the Health and Medicine Division’s Fineberg Impact Award in 2016 for her efforts to increase the visibility of Roundtable workshops and publications. Prior to this, Ms. Shefska studied urban geography at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, where she conducted research on how neighborhoods influence gestational diabetes.

ELIZABETH TOWNSEND is an associate program officer with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families (BCYF) at the National Academies, who in addition to supporting this study supported the Committee on Building an Agenda to Reduce the Number of Children in Poverty by Half in 10 Years. Prior to joining these studies, Townsend was a research associate for the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences’ Decadal Survey on Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security. Other BCYF studies she has worked on include Ethical Considerations for Research on Housing-Related Health Hazards Involving Children; Children’s Health, the Nation’s Wealth: Assessing and Improving Child Health; and Working Families and Growing Kids: Caring for Children and Adolescents. She holds a B.S. from Radford University and an M.P.H. from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where she interned with the Comprehensive Cancer Center and volunteered with the Alabama Vaccine Research Clinic and 1917 Clinic.

JOANNA LEE WILLIAMS is an associate professor at the Curry School of Education and Human Development, University of Virginia, and is affiliated with Youth-Nex: The University of Virginia Center to Promote Effective Youth Development, and the Center for Race and Public Education in the South. Williams’ research interests focus on race and ethnicity as social contexts for youth development. Specifically, her work examines issues of equity and diversity in the context of school-based peer social networks, and ethnic identity as an element of positive youth development. She also has applied interests in understanding diversity, peer relations, and positive outcomes in youth development programs and previously served as associate director of research for the Young Women Leaders Program, a mentoring program for middle school girls. Williams holds a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Temple University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×
Page 459
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×
Page 460
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×
Page 461
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×
Page 462
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×
Page 463
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×
Page 464
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×
Page 465
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×
Page 466
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×
Page 467
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biosketches ofCommittee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25388.
×
Page 468
Next: Board on Children, Youth, and Families »
The Promise of Adolescence: Realizing Opportunity for All Youth Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $87.00 Buy Ebook | $69.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Adolescence—beginning with the onset of puberty and ending in the mid-20s—is a critical period of development during which key areas of the brain mature and develop. These changes in brain structure, function, and connectivity mark adolescence as a period of opportunity to discover new vistas, to form relationships with peers and adults, and to explore one’s developing identity. It is also a period of resilience that can ameliorate childhood setbacks and set the stage for a thriving trajectory over the life course.

Because adolescents comprise nearly one-fourth of the entire U.S. population, the nation needs policies and practices that will better leverage these developmental opportunities to harness the promise of adolescence—rather than focusing myopically on containing its risks. This report examines the neurobiological and socio-behavioral science of adolescent development and outlines how this knowledge can be applied, both to promote adolescent well-being, resilience, and development, and to rectify structural barriers and inequalities in opportunity, enabling all adolescents to flourish.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!