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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management "Air Quality Modeling in the Gulf of Mexico Region" Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25600.
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Page 43
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management "Air Quality Modeling in the Gulf of Mexico Region" Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25600.
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Page 44
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management "Air Quality Modeling in the Gulf of Mexico Region" Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25600.
×
Page 45
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management "Air Quality Modeling in the Gulf of Mexico Region" Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25600.
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Page 46

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44 REVIEW OF THE BOEM “AIR QUALITY MODELING IN THE GOMR” STUDY Heidorn, K. C., and D. Yap. 1986. A synoptic climatology for surface ozone concentrations in Southern Ontario, 1976–1981. Atmospheric Environment (1967) 20(4):695-703. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/0004-6981(86)90184-8. Huang, C. H. 2015. Derivation of exemption formulas for air quality regulatory applications. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 65(3):358-364. DOI: 10.1080/10962247.2014.993003. Jacob, D. J., and D. A. Winner. 2009. Effect of climate change on air quality. Atmospheric Environment 43(1):51-63. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2008.09.051. Kitada, T. 1987. Turbulence structure of sea breeze front and its implication in air pollution transport — Application of k-ɛ turbulence model. Boundary-Layer Meteorology 41(1):217-239. DOI: 10.1007/bf00120440. Lyons, W. A., C. J. Tremback, and R. A. Pielke. 1995. Applications of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to Provide Input to Photochemical Grid Models for the Lake Michigan Ozone Study (LMOS). Journal of Applied Meteorology 34(8):1762-1786. DOI: 10.1175/1520-0450(1995)034<1762:Aotram>2.0.Co;2. Mellqvist, J., J. Samuelsson, J. Johansson, C. Rivera, B. Lefer, S. Alvarez, and J. Jolly. 2010. Measurements of industrial emissions of alkenes in Texas using the solar occultation flux method. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 115(D7). DOI: 10.1029/2008jd011682. Morris, G. A., B. Ford, B. Rappenglück, A. M. Thompson, A. Mefferd, F. Ngan, and B. Lefer. 2010. An evaluation of the interaction of morning residual layer and afternoon mixed layer ozone in Houston using ozonesonde data. Atmospheric Environment 44(33):4024-4034. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2009.06.057. Morris, R. E., B. Koo, B. Wang, G. Stella, D. McNally, and C. Loomis. 2009a. Technical Support Document for VISTAS Emissions and Air Quality Modeling to Support Regional Haze State Implementation Plans. Arvada, CO: ENVIRON International Corporation, Novato, CA and Alpine Geophysics, LLC. Morris, R. E., B. Koo, T. Sakulyanontvittaya, G. Stella, D. McNally, C. Loomis, and T. W. Tesche. 2009b. Technical Support Document for the Association for Southeastern Integrated Planning (ASIP) Emissions and Air Quality Modeling to Support PM2.5 and 8-Hour Ozone State Implementation Plans. Arvada, CO: ENVIRON International Corporation, Novato, CA and Alpine Geophysics, LLC. Nielsen‐Gammon, J., J. Tobin, A. McNeel, and G. Li. 2005. A conceptual model for eight‐hour ozone exceedances in Houston, Texas Part I: Background ozone levels in eastern Texas. Houston, TX: Houston Advanced Research Center. Nolte, C. G., P. D. Dolwick, N. Fann, L. W. Horowitz, V. Naik, R. W. Pinder, T. L. Spero, D. A. Winner, and L. H. Ziska. 2018. Air Quality. In Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States: Fourth National Climate Assessment, Volume II D. R. Reidmiller, C. W. Avery, D. R. Easterling, K. E. Kunkel, K. L. M. Lewis, T. K. Maycock and B. C. Stewart, eds. Washington, DC: U.S. Global Change Research Program. NRC. 2007. Models in Environmental Regulatory Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. DOI: 10.17226/11972. Oreskes, N. 1998. Evaluation (not validation) of quantitative models. Environmental Health Perspectives 106(Suppl 6):1453-1460. DOI: 10.1289/ehp.98106s61453. Pasquill, F. 1962. Atmospheric Diffusion. London: Van Nostrand. Qiao, X., Y. Tang, J. Hu, S. Zhang, J. Li, S. H. Kota, L. Wu, H. Gao, H. Zhang, and Q. Ying. 2015. Modeling dry and wet deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ions in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, China using a source-oriented CMAQ model: Part I. Base case model results. Science of The Total Environment 532:831-839. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.05.108. Rappenglück, B., R. Perna, S. Zhong, and G. A. Morris. 2008. An analysis of the vertical structure of the atmosphere and the upper-level meteorology and their impact on surface ozone levels in Houston, Texas. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 113(D17). DOI: 10.1029/2007jd009745.

REFERENCES 45 Robeson, S. M., and D. G. Steyn. 1990. Evaluation and comparison of statistical forecast models for daily maximum ozone concentrations. Atmospheric Environment. Part B. Urban Atmosphere 24(2):303-312. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/0957-1272(90)90036-T. Rubin, J. I., A. J. Kean, R. A. Harley, D. B. Millet, and A. H. Goldstein. 2006. Temperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 111(D3). DOI: 10.1029/2005jd006458. Ryerson, T. B., M. Trainer, W. M. Angevine, C. A. Brock, R. W. Dissly, F. C. Fehsenfeld, G. J. Frost, P. D. Goldan, J. S. Holloway, G. Hübler, R. O. Jakoubek, W. C. Kuster, J. A. Neuman, D. K. Nicks Jr., D. D. Parrish, J. M. Roberts, D. T. Sueper, E. L. Atlas, S. G. Donnelly, F. Flocke, A. Fried, W. T. Potter, S. Schauffler, V. Stroud, A. J. Weinheimer, B. P. Wert, C. Wiedinmyer, R. J. Alvarez, R. M. Banta, L. S. Darby, and C. J. Senff. 2003. Effect of petrochemical industrial emissions of reactive alkenes and NOx on tropospheric ozone formation in Houston, Texas. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 108(D8). DOI: 10.1029/2002jd003070. Shen, L., L. J. Mickley, E. M. Leibensperger, and M. Li. 2017. Strong dependence of U.S. Summertime Air Quality on the Decadal Variability of Atlantic Sea Surface Temperatures. Geophysical Research Letters 44(24):12,527-512,535. DOI: 10.1002/2017gl075905. Systems Applications International, Sonoma Technology Inc., Earth Tech, Alpine Geophysics, and A. T. Kearney. 1995. Gulf of Mexico Air Quality Study, Final Report. Volume 1: Summary of Data Analysis and Modeling. OCS Study MMS 95-0038. New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region. Travis, K. R., D. J. Jacob, J. A. Fisher, P. S. Kim, E. A. Marais, L. Zhu, K. Yu, C. C. Miller, R. M. Yantosca, M. P. Sulprizio, A. M. Thompson, P. O. Wennberg, J. D. Crounse, J. M. St. Clair, R. C. Cohen, J. L. Laughner, J. E. Dibb, S. R. Hall, K. Ullmann, G. M. Wolfe, I. B. Pollack, J. Peischl, J. A. Neuman, and X. Zhou. 2016. Why do models overestimate surface ozone in the Southeast United States? Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 16(21):13561-13577. DOI: 10.5194/acp-16-13561-2016. Vose, R. S., D. R. Easterling, K. E. Kunkel, A. N. LeGrande, and M. F. Wehner. 2017. Temperature changes in the United States. In Climate Science Special Report: Fourth National Climate Assessment, Volume I. D. J. Wuebbles, D. W. Fahey, K. A. Hibbard, D. J. Dokken, B. C. Stewart and T. K. Maycock, eds. Washington, DC: U.S. Global Change Research Program. Wang, P., G. Schade, M. Estes, and Q. Ying. 2017. Improved MEGAN predictions of biogenic isoprene in the contiguous United States. Atmospheric Environment 148:337-351. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2016.11.006. Warneke, C., J. A. de Gouw, L. Del Negro, J. Brioude, S. McKeen, H. Stark, W. C. Kuster, P. D. Goldan, M. Trainer, F. C. Fehsenfeld, C. Wiedinmyer, A. B. Guenther, A. Hansel, A. Wisthaler, E. Atlas, J. S. Holloway, T. B. Ryerson, J. Peischl, L. G. Huey, and A. T. C. Hanks. 2010. Biogenic emission measurement and inventories determination of biogenic emissions in the eastern United States and Texas and comparison with biogenic emission inventories. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 115(D7). DOI: 10.1029/2009jd012445. Wert, B. P., M. Trainer, A. Fried, T. B. Ryerson, B. Henry, W. Potter, W. M. Angevine, E. Atlas, S. G. Donnelly, F. C. Fehsenfeld, G. J. Frost, P. D. Goldan, A. Hansel, J. S. Holloway, G. Hubler, W. C. Kuster, D. K. Nicks Jr., J. A. Neuman, D. D. Parrish, S. Schauffler, J. Stutz, D. T. Sueper, C. Wiedinmyer, and A. Wisthaler. 2003. Signatures of terminal alkene oxidation in airborne formaldehyde measurements during TexAQS 2000. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 108(D3). DOI: 10.1029/2002jd002502. Wong, H., R. Elleman, E. Wolvovsky, K. Richmond, and J. Paumier. 2016. AERCOARE: An overwater meteorological preprocessor for AERMOD. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 66(11):1121-1140. DOI: 10.1080/10962247.2016.1202156. Wyszogrodzki, A. A., Y. Liu, N. Jacobs, P. Childs, Y. Zhang, G. Roux, and T. T. Warner. 2013. Analysis of the surface temperature and wind forecast errors of the NCAR-AirDat operational CONUS 4-

46 REVIEW OF THE BOEM “AIR QUALITY MODELING IN THE GOMR” STUDY km WRF forecasting system. Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics 122(3):125-143. DOI: 10.1007/s00703-013-0281-5. Ying, Q., P. Wang, and H. Gao. 2015. Improving Modeled Biogenic Isoprene Emissions under Drought Conditions and Evaluating Their Impact on Ozone Formation. AQRP Project 14-030. Austin, TX: Texas Air Quality Research Program, The University of Texas at Austin. Zhang, H., Z. Pu, and X. Zhang. 2013. Examination of Errors in Near-Surface Temperature and Wind from WRF Numerical Simulations in Regions of Complex Terrain. Weather and Forecasting 28(3):893-914. DOI: 10.1175/waf-d-12-00109.1. Zhang, J., and S. T. Rao. 1999. The Role of Vertical Mixing in the Temporal Evolution of Ground-Level Ozone Concentrations. Journal of Applied Meteorology 38(12):1674-1691. DOI: 10.1175/1520- 0450(1999)038<1674:Trovmi>2.0.Co;2.

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Emissions associated with oil and gas exploration, development, and production on the Gulf waters can result in increased levels of air pollutants that contribute to a range of air quality impacts in the Gulf of Mexico Region (GOMR). “Criteria air pollutants”, such as carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, particulate matter, and sulfur dioxide, are considered harmful to public health and the environment. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) manages the U.S. outer continental shelf oil and gas resources and is required to help manage air quality in the GOMR.

Review of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management “Air Quality Modeling in the Gulf of Mexico Region” Study reviews and provides feedback on the BOEM’s Air Quality Modeling in the Gulf of Mexico Region Study. This independent technical review of the study explores whether the study meets its goals, accurately reflects the scientific literature, uses reasonable data and modeling analyses, approaches quantitative modeling appropriately, documents findings in a consistent, transparent, and credible way, and aligns with necessary guidelines.

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