National Academies Press: OpenBook

Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report (2019)

Chapter: 4. 10 ACRP Sponsored Research Suggestions

« Previous: 3. Strategic Themes
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Suggested Citation:"4. 10 ACRP Sponsored Research Suggestions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25605.
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Suggested Citation:"4. 10 ACRP Sponsored Research Suggestions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25605.
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Suggested Citation:"4. 10 ACRP Sponsored Research Suggestions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25605.
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Page 19
Suggested Citation:"4. 10 ACRP Sponsored Research Suggestions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25605.
×
Page 19
Page 20
Suggested Citation:"4. 10 ACRP Sponsored Research Suggestions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25605.
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Page 20

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Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report 16 This section describes 10 near-term ACRP-sponsored research suggestions that pertain to the five different strategic themes examined as part of this research roadmap. 4.1 Landside Connectivity 1. Landside Connectivity (and/or update ACRP Report 35, “Planning for Offsite Terminals”): airports with landside congestion are increasingly looking at options for staging passengers off-site for pick-ups and drop-off as well as for taxis and TNC operations, and bringing them to airport terminals in buses, APMs, and possibly through automated vehicles. These strategies require examination of their congestion-relief benefits as well as the operating cost implications. Airports increasingly refer to ground transportation facilities outside of the main terminal area as “auxiliary curbs.” 2. First to Last Mile Strategies—Managing the Customer Experience: increasing focus on the customer experience recognizes the “home to gate” nature of airport trips. What has not been extensively researched is how airports can influence the multiple agencies and organizations that affect the customer experience to improve it. Together with technologies that make the customer journey more visible—to the airport, customer and other stakeholders—the possibilities of improving the customer experience have arrived. 3. Improving Airport Parking Through New Pricing and Product Models (align with the active report ACRP 03-47, “Rethinking Airport Parking Facilities to Protect and Enhance Non- Aeronautical Revenue” scope): in the last 5 years, many U.S. airports have lost parking revenues as off-airport parking competition and new entrants, such as TNCs, have increased their shares for passengers accessing the airport. A small number of airports have begun procurement processes for parking reservation systems that enable a variety of new products and provide forward-booking information useful for more sophisticated pricing. These systems have been in place at airports in the United Kingdom and other aviation markets for some time. How can U.S. airports take advantage of these systems and increase their market share and revenue? 4 10 ACRP Sponsored Research Suggestions

Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report 17 4. Autonomous Vehicles (AVs) at Airports: as AVs gradually enter the transportation system, AVs and CAVs are increasingly being considered by airport planners. Compared to other technologies, such as Automated People Movers, they potentially provide a cost-affordable and flexible, point-to-point solution for the movement of airport users on- and off-airport. 4.2 Airside and Terminal Planning 5. Remote Air Traffic Control Towers, Ramp Towers and Enabling Technologies: globally, air traffic control providers are increasingly utilizing air traffic facilities operated remotely from airports. This allows for a cost-efficient solution that promises to increase safety and airport availability in subpar weather conditions. In the U.S., the pace of adoption has been more gradual, but already tests are underway in Virginia and Colorado. Research suggests that remote towers and towers to assist with ramp control, could be useful in remote regions such as Alaska and could assist airports with manned towers when development creates “blind spots” on the airside (which cameras could cover). What promise, and applications do remote towers and ramp towers, as well as accompanying technologies, have for U.S. airports? 4.3 Air Service Management 6. Airport Congestion Management Strategies: for congested airports, often because of its geographic location, it is challenging to expand airside, terminal or ground transportation capacity. Through its regulations, especially for the airside, FAA rules circumscribe the types of strategies that can be employed to alleviate congestion and maximize throughput. However, even slot-controlled airports; often enjoy increases in passenger capacity. Within the FAA regulations, especially with terminals and ground transportation, what policies are permitted to encourage efficient utilization of the facility and promote increased throughput? How can use during non-peak times be incentivized? The study or legal synthesis, while accounting for legal and regulatory differences, should look at U.S. and other nations where congested airports have successfully used management strategies to deliver more capacity. 7. The Role of Airports in Facilitating Passenger Self-Connects: many city-pair markets globally are not large enough to be served by a connecting itinerary offered by a global alliance, or the cost can be prohibitive. Increasingly passengers are using smart phone technologies and web sites such as kiwi.com to book their own multi-segment trips. These trips are not interlined (i.e., the journeys require multiple tickets) and passengers assume some risks unless the travel provider or the airport provides insurance or other protective measures. Airports such as

Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report 18 London Gatwick and Milan have self-connect programs that facilitate passenger connections. This study would determine the prevalence of self-connects in the U.S. and what U.S. airports could do to enhance connections (e.g., connected concourses, premium security lanes for international to domestic travelers, expedited checked bag drops and insurance products). 4.4 Airport Business Models 8. VFM and Airports: as airports plan their future facilities, they increasingly consider alternative methods of project delivery, either by the airport itself or through a public-private partnership with a variety of possible partners. How can airports assess which delivery method is appropriate for their airport, considering the asset, revenues (if any) that are associated with the asset, risk tolerance, and local and state procurement laws? Examples of VFM and other processes for determining the appropriate project delivery method would aid airports in cost-effectively delivering timely projects (while ACRP has commissioned past reports on alternative project delivery methods, including ACRP Report 21, “A Guidebook for Selecting Airport Capital Project Delivery Methods”, these reports are not explicitly about a VFM process that joins commercial and project delivery processes).6 9. Airport-Airline Agreements and Rate Ordinances (update ACRP Report 36: Airport/Airline Agreements): in recent years, a growing number of airports and their airline partners have negotiated new varieties of airline agreements, including agreements with shorter terms and with new models of revenue sharing (often referred to as hybrid agreements). In some cases, airports have not negotiated an agreement and have adopted a rate ordinance. Updating ACRP Report 36 would give airports insights into the negotiation processes and the options they have for seeking agreements or choosing to adopt a rate ordinance. Given that this area is one regulated by the FAA, consideration should be given to demonstration of regulatory/legal expertise. 4.5 Governance and Community Engagement 10. P3s and the Airport and the Community: billion-dollar P3s in some of the biggest aviation markets, including New York and Los Angeles, are currently underway after many years of analysts asking when airport P3s were going to come to the U.S. Now that they are here, 6 An example VFM template can be found from the Government of Alberta: http://www.infrastructure.alberta.ca/Appendix-D3-VFM-Report-template.docx

Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report 19 what are the implications of P3s for airport governing boards, executive teams, and the community? How does it affect their roles when an asset may be managed and operated by a private entity for two or three decades? What influence do and should boards and executives have over the asset? How should this impact the negotiation strategy employed by the airport with the private entities?

Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report 20 Appendices

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Major technological and security changes in the aviation industry over the past 20 years have forced airport leaders and aviation stakeholders to think of new research ideas that will improve the planning and development of policies and new models that foster growth of air service, incorporate new airport and customer technology, revise airport business models, and better interact with neighboring communities.

ACRP (Airport Cooperative Research Program) Web-Only Document 39: Policy and Planning Issues Roadmap Report is one of several Research Roadmap Reports that the ACRP commissioned to generate the research ideas that will help airports solve common problems, learn about new technologies, and assess innovations in services and operations.

Planning and policy together represent one of 10 identified categories of research that directly involves and benefits the airport industry. Policy and planning issues are especially sensitive to developments in the aviation industry. For example, airport boards and executives may adopt new commercial strategies to raise additional airport revenues (an internal decision), while the FAA may change the criteria or funding levels for airport programs (an external decision).

These Research Roadmaps augment the continuous ACRP solicitation process to airport industry practitioners for research ideas and problem statements.

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