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Are Generational Categories Meaningful Distinctions for Workforce Management? (2020)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Are Generational Categories Meaningful Distinctions for Workforce Management?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25796.
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Page 134
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Are Generational Categories Meaningful Distinctions for Workforce Management?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25796.
×
Page 135
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Are Generational Categories Meaningful Distinctions for Workforce Management?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25796.
×
Page 136
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Are Generational Categories Meaningful Distinctions for Workforce Management?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25796.
×
Page 137
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Are Generational Categories Meaningful Distinctions for Workforce Management?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25796.
×
Page 138

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Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs       Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Nancy T. Tippins (Chair) is a principal at The Nancy T. Tippins Group, LLC, Greenville, South Carolina. As an industrial and organizational psychologist, she has worked as both an internal and external consultant to a variety of industries. Her work encompasses the study of employment practices, including executive coaching, job analysis, competency development, selection, training, manager and executive assessment, employee and management development, succession planning, compensation, complaint procedures, and other policies and procedures related to equal employment opportunity. For the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, she has served as president, on the ad hoc committee for the revision of the Principles for the Validation and Use of Personnel Selection Procedures, and as cochair of the committee for the most recent revision of the Principles. She was one of the U.S. representatives on the International Standardization Organization committee to establish international testing standards. She has a B.A. in history from Agnes Scott College, an M.Ed. in counseling and psychological services from Georgia State University, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Eric M. Anderman is professor and former chair in the Department of Educational Studies at The Ohio State University, with appointments in educational psychology and the quantitative research, evaluation, and measurement program. Previously, he held faculty and administrator positions at the University of Kentucky. Although much of his research has focused on student learning and motivation, he is also interested in how learning progresses in work contexts. While serving as department chair, he administered 13 graduate programs, including a highly ranked online degree program. He has also participated in and chaired a coalition of psychologists working to translate psychological science and solve problems associated with schools and education for the American Psychological Association. He is the editor of the journal Theory into Practice and is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and of the American Educational Research Association. He has a Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Michigan. John Baugh is the Margaret Bush Wilson professor in arts and sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, where he holds academic appointments in psychological and brain sciences, anthropology, linguistics, education, English, African and African American Studies, American culture studies, philosophy-neuroscience-psychology, and urban studies. His previous academic appointments were at Swarthmore College, the University of Texas at Austin, and Stanford University, where he is professor emeritus of education and linguistics. His research evaluates the social stratification of linguistic diversity in advanced industrial societies with relevance to matters of policy in education, medicine, and law. His work also focuses on advancing studies of linguistic B ‐1   

Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs       profiling and various forms of linguistic discrimination. He is a fellow of the Linguistic Society of America. He received a B.A. in speech and communication from Temple University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania. Margaret E. Beier is a professor of psychological sciences at Rice University. Her research interests lie at the intersection of aging, lifelong learning and development, and work. In particular, she examines the motivation and ability determinants of behavior at different stages of the work lifespan, from school to work and work to retirement. She also examines the effectiveness of various educational interventions and individual factors on learning, performance, and noncognitive outcomes, such as self-efficacy, self-concept, and interests. She is a member of the American Educational Research Association, and she is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychologists (Division 14) of the American Psychological Association. She received a B.A. from Colby College in Waterville, Maine and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in psychology from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Dana H. Born is a lecturer in public policy at Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She is also codirector of the Center for Public Leadership and faculty chair of the Senior Executive Fellows Program. She is a retired brigadier general of the U.S. Air Force, and she served two terms as the dean of the faculty and department chair for the Behavioral Sciences and Leadership Department at the U.S. Air Force Academy. During her military career, she also served as an exchange officer with the Royal Australian Air Force; aide and speech writer to the Secretary of the Air Force; squadron commander at Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C.; and in Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Her experiences and training form the basis of her focus today on change and risk management, organizational behavior and ethics, character-based leadership development, human and social capacity and performance, strategic alignment, inclusive excellence, diversity, decision-making and gender related issues. She has a B.S. in behavioral sciences the U.S. Air Force Academy, an M.S. in experimental psychology from Trinity University, an M.A. in research psychology from the University of Melbourne, and a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from Penn State University. Chandra Childers is a study director at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, Washington, DC, an organization that advances women’s status through research, policy analysis, and public education. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods, her research uses an intersectional lens to examine women’s and men’s employment, earnings, and job quality; the effects of technology (automation/artificial intelligence/digitalization) on current and future labor market experiences; and issues and concerns for women and girls of color. The work includes a study of unemployment during and after the Great Recession for millennial women and the effect of automation on the future of work for older women. Previously, at the University of Washington, she taught a range of courses, including the research practicum, and provided research support for projects that included employment discrimination cases. She has a M.S. in human development from Texas Tech University and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Washington—Seattle. Brent Donnellan is chair and a professor of the Department of Psychology at Michigan State University. Previously, he was a professor of psychology at Texas A&M University. His research investigates questions at the intersections of developmental psychology, personality psychology, and psychological assessment. He also works on methodological reform in psychological science, B ‐2   

Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs       and he has published several papers about the size and strength of the evidence for generational shifts in individual characteristics, including personality, self-esteem, and other attitudes. He is currently a co-lead on a study investigating how experiences in the workplace are associated with personality trait development. He is the senior editor for the personality section for Collabra: Psychology. He has a Ph.D. in human development from the University of California, Davis. Armando X. Estrada is an assistant professor in the Department of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies at Temple University. His research centers on the assessment of job attitudes and behaviors, training development and evaluation, and strategic planning and assessment. He works on factors influencing diversity, inclusion, and engagement, with particular focus in two areas: women and minorities in civilian and military organizations and factors influencing leadership, teamwork, and performance, especially on cohesion, readiness, resilience, and effectiveness of collectives in civilian and military organizations. He previously served as a program manager and senior research psychologist with the Foundational Science Research Unit of the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Earlier, he held various academic positions, including professorships at Washington State University, the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, and National Defense University. He has a B.S. and an M.S. in psychology from the California State University at Los Angeles and a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the University of Texas at El Paso. Brian Hoffman is a professor in the Department of Psychology and the chair of the industrial- organizational psychology program at the University of Georgia. His research and publications cover the changing nature of work and workers, the assessment and prediction of effective leadership, and the application of management principles to sports settings. His primary research interest revolves around the measurement and prediction of human performance, with a specific emphasis on evaluating the skills and behaviors associated with effective leadership. His work focuses in particular on measuring visionary leadership, managerial skills, and altruism at work. He is a fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and currently serves as an associate editor of the Journal of Management. He has a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the University of Tennessee. Arne L. Kalleberg is the Kenan Distinguished professor of sociology, chair of the Curriculum in Global Studies, and adjunct professor of public policy and of management at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He also serves as distinguished research fellow in the Center for Strategy and Leadership at the Foundation for Research in Economics and Business Administration in Bergen, Norway. He has published extensively in the areas of the sociology of work, occupations and organizations, economy and society, and social stratification and inequality. He is editor in chief of Social Forces, an international journal of social research. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Labor and Employment Relations Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Ruth Kanfer is a professor of psychology in the School of Psychology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on the influence of motivation, personality, and emotion in workplace behavior, job performance, and worker well-being. She has examined the impact of these people factors and situational constraints as they affect skill training, job search, teamwork, B ‐3   

Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs       job performance, and the development of workplace competencies. Her recent projects have focused on adult development and workforce gaining, job search–employment relations, motivation in and of teams, and person determinants of cross-cultural effectiveness. She is director of the Work Science Center and codirector of the Kanfer-Ackerman laboratory, which conducts longitudinal and large-scale laboratory and field collaborative projects on such topics as workforce aging, work adjustment, cognitive fatigue, skill acquisition, adult development and career trajectories, and self- regulated learning. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Sciences and the Academy of Management. She has a Ph.D. in psychology from Arizona State University. Maria Lytell is a senior behavioral scientist and associate director of the Personnel, Training, and Health Program in the Arroyo Center at the RAND Corporation in Arlington, Virginia. She assists in the oversight of a portfolio of studies for the U.S. Army that span five research streams: total workforce management, recruiting and retention, leader development, training readiness and effectiveness, and soldier and family wellness and support. In addition, she leads and contributes to projects that include diversity in the U.S. military, career field classification for U.S. Air Force personnel, and proficiency of U.S. Army enlisted intelligence analysts. She was previously a member of the research staff of the Military Leadership Diversity Commission, a large commission mandated by Congress to recommend how the U.S. military can increase diversity in its top ranks. She also held two internships as a graduate student, one for a private firm designing personnel selection systems and the other for a state-level government office refining civil service job classification series. She has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in industrial-organizational psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Michael S. North is an assistant professor of management and organizations at the New York University Stern School of Business. His research focuses primarily on age, ageism, generational issues, and related management and policy issues. At the Stern School, he is the founding director of the Accommodating Generations in Employment (AGE) Initiative, which conducts research pertaining to the increasingly older and intergenerational workplace and workforce. His work is aimed at identifying strategies for businesses, policy makers, and society to adapt to multigenerational workforce trends. He was recently designated a “rising star” by the Association for Psychological Science. He has a B.A. in psychology from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in psychology and social policy from Princeton University. Julie Anne Schuck (Study Director) is a program officer with the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has provided analytical, administrative, and editorial support for a many studies and workshops and served as a technical writer for many reports. Her projects have covered a wide range of subjects, including law and justice issues; national security; STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematic) education; the science of human-system integration, workforce development, and the evaluations of several federal research programs. She has a B.S. in engineering physics from the University of California, San Diego, and an M.S. in education from Cornell University. Joanne Spetz is the Brenda and Jeffrey L. Kang Presidential chair in Health Care Finance at the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies (IHPS) at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). She also is associate director for research at IHPS and a professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at UCSF. She is the associate director for research B ‐4   

Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs       at the Healthforce Center at UCSF and the director of the UCSF Health Workforce Research Center for Long-Term Care. Her fields of specialty are economics of the health care workforce, shortages and supply of registered nurses, organization and quality of the hospital industry, effects of health information technology, effects of medical marijuana policy on youth substance use, and the workforce involved in treatment of substance use disorders. She studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University. Mo Wang is the Lanzillotti-McKethan eminent scholar chair in the Warrington College of Business, the chair of the Management Department, and director of the Human Resource Research Center, all at the University of Florida. He specializes in research on retirement and older worker employment, occupational health psychology, and advanced quantitative methodologies. The Human Resources Research Center contributes to both the science and the profession of human resource management by supporting educational programs and research that focus on factors that affect human performance in work settings. He was the editor of the Oxford Handbook of Retirement and currently serves as the editor-in-chief for Work, Aging and Retirement. Previously, he served as president of the Society for Occupational Health Psychology and director for the Science of Organizations Program at the National Science Foundation. He has a Ph.D. in industrial- organizational psychology and developmental psychology from Bowling Green State University. B ‐5   

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Headlines frequently appear that purport to highlight the differences among workers of different generations and explain how employers can manage the wants and needs of each generation. But is each new generation really that different from previous ones? Are there fundamental differences among generations that impact how they act and interact in the workplace? Or are the perceived differences among generations simply an indicator of age-related differences between older and younger workers or a reflection of all people adapting to a changing workplace?

Are Generational Categories Meaningful Distinctions for Workforce Management? reviews the state and rigor of the empirical work related to generations and assesses whether generational categories are meaningful in tackling workforce management problems. This report makes recommendations for directions for future research and improvements to employment practices.

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