National Academies Press: OpenBook

A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level (2020)

Chapter: Appendix F: Committee Member Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25876.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25876.
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Page 290
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25876.
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Page 291
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25876.
×
Page 292
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25876.
×
Page 293
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25876.
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Page 294

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Appendix F Committee Member Biographical Sketches Barbara O. Schneeman (Chair) is professor emerita of the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) and currently serves on the Food and Nutri- tion Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medi- cine (NASEM). She previously served as director of the Office of Nutrition, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), where she oversaw the development of policy and regulations for dietary supplements, labeling, food standards, infant formula, and medical foods. Her prior positions include serving on the nutrition and food science faculty at UC Davis, as well as chair of the Department of Nutrition, dean of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and associate vice provost for university outreach. She is a fellow of the American So- ciety of Nutrition and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a National Associate of NASEM. She is a recipient of the Conrad Elvehjem Award for Public Service in Nutrition, the Gilbert Leveille award and lectureship, Carl Fellers award and the Samuel Cate Prescott award for research and of the commissioner’s special citation, the Harvey W. Wiley Medal, and the merit award from the FDA. She has B.S. degree in food science from UC Davis, a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University of California, Berkeley, and postdoctoral training in gastrointestinal physiol- ogy at Children’s Hospital in Oakland, California. Robert B. Cialdini (Consultant) is the Regents’ professor emeritus of psy- chology and marketing at Arizona State University. He is also chief ex- ecutive officer and president of Influence at Work, Tempe, Arizona, which 289

290 NATIONAL STRATEGY TO REDUCE FOOD WASTE focuses on ethical influence training, corporate keynote programs, and the Cialdini method certified trainer program. He has held visiting scholar ap- pointments at Ohio State University, the University of California, the An- nenberg School of Communications, and the Graduate School of Business of Stanford University. His research is devoted to the science of influence and its contributions to the fields of persuasion, compliance, and negotia- tion. His book Influence: Science & Practice, a New York Times bestseller, distilled research on why people comply with requests. He has a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of North Carolina. Cait Lamberton is Alberto I. Duran Presidential Distinguished Professor of Marketing at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. Her research focuses on consumer behavior, with particular focus on topics related to self-control, the reduction of waste in retail and policy settings, scarcity, and online consumer experience. She was an affiliated researcher in the first year of the White House’s social and behavioral science team and is currently a team scientist at the University of Pennsylvania’s Behav- ior Change for Good Initiative. She has also been a consultant to the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Labor, and to major food manufacturers and financial services firms. She was identified as one of the 25 most productive marketing scholars in the world by the American Marketing Association, and she is a recipient of the Erin Anderson award of the American Marketing Association, the Hunt/Maynard award of the Journal of Marketing, and the Lazaridis prize for her work on digital and social media, also from the Journal of Marketing. She has a B.A. in English literature from Wheaton College and an M.B.A. and a Ph.D. in business administration and marketing from the University of South Carolina. Laura C. Moreno is a recent graduate of UC Berkeley’s doctoral program in energy and resources. Her research centers around food wasted in house- holds in the United States with a focus on measurement and behavior; how food becomes “waste” within the broader contexts of the food system, health, and everyday life. As part of her research, she worked with the Natural Resources Defense Council, leading the first-of-its-kind household level measurement in the United States, and with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality on a study of wasted food in urban and rural Ore- gon households. Previously, she worked as an environmental scientist at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, focusing on reducing organic waste materials, including food waste, from reaching landfills. In addition to her Ph.D., she has a B.S. in conservation and resources studies and a Master’s in energy and resources from the University of California, Berkeley.

APPENDIX F 291 Roni Neff is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering and the Department of Health Policy and Manage- ment at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She also is a program director at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, an academic center focused on food systems and public health.  Her research focuses on food system environmental sustainability and resilience, includ- ing equity. She performs interdisciplinary, applied social science research targeting wasted food from a variety of angles, from the consumer level to policy interventions to food donation and distribution, including leading a 4-year study of seafood waste across the U.S. supply chain. She is on the executive team for the National Food Access and COVID Research Team and is studying food security and food worker issues during COVID. She co-directs a new Ph.D. track in sustainability, resilience and health, and graduate-level food systems concentration and certificate programs. She has an A.B. from Brown University, an M.S. from the Harvard School of Public Health, and a Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Richard E. Nisbett is the Theodore M. Newcomb distinguished university professor of psychology emeritus and research professor emeritus at the Institute for Social Research of the University of Michigan. He is former director of the university’s Cognitive Science Program and former codirec- tor of the university’s Culture and Cognition Program. His research inter- ests focus on reasoning and basic cognitive processes, especially induction, statistical reasoning, causal attribution, cost-benefit analysis, and logical versus dialectical approaches to problem solving. He is a recipient of the distinguished scientific contribution award and the William James fellow award of the American Psychological Society and the distinguished senior scientist award of the Society for Experimental Social Psychology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Acad- emy of Arts and Sciences. His book The Geography of Thought: How Asians and Westerners Think Differently and Why won the William James Award from the American Psychological Association. He has a Ph.D. in social psychology from Columbia University. Jennifer J. Otten is an associate professor and food systems director in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, a core faculty member in the Nutritional Sciences Program at the University of Washington School of Public Health, and co-director of the university’s Livable City Year. Her research focus is at the intersection of food systems, population health, and nutrition. She studies the effects of policies and the policy process on diet-related health behaviors and health outcomes; food systems, including school food waste as a community food security

292 NATIONAL STRATEGY TO REDUCE FOOD WASTE opportunity and state and local government strategies for managing food waste; and on understanding and improving the ways in which research reaches public policy forums. Previously, she served in various capacities for the Institute of Medicine (now the Health and Medicine Division) of NASEM, including as a study director and as the organization’s first com- munications director. She has a B.S. in nutritional sciences from Texas A&M University, an M.S. in nutrition communications from Tufts Univer- sity, and a Ph.D. in animal, nutrition, and food sciences from the University of Vermont. Brian E. Roe is the Van Buren professor and associate chair of the De- partment of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics at Ohio State University. He works broadly in the areas of agricultural and environmental economics, focusing on food waste, agricultural market- ing, information policy, behavioral economics, and product quality. His recent research includes a project focused on local foods and school lunch programs, an exploration of the role of nudges in reducing household food waste, and a multidisciplinary team project seeking to understand human- ecosystem feedbacks in the Western Lake Erie basin, including understand- ing how farms and agribusinesses respond to voluntary environmental programs. He also helped form and currently leads the Ohio State food waste collaborative, a collection of researchers, practitioners, and students working to promote the reduction and redirection of food waste as an inte- gral part of a healthy and sustainable food system. He has a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Maryland-College Park. Christopher M. Shea is an associate professor of health policy and man- agement in the Gillings School of Global Public Health, adjunct associate professor of social medicine in the School of Medicine, research fellow at the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, and a faculty lead for the North Carolina Translational & Clinical Sciences Institute’s implementation science unit, all at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. His research uses both quantitative and qualitative methods to focus on adoption and implementation of innovations by individuals and orga- nizations, particularly innovations supported by information technology. Two implementation strategies that his work has focused on are assessing readiness for change and employing champions of change. He has a B.B.A. in finance and English from James Madison University, an M.A. in English from West Virginia University, and an M.P.A. and a Ph.D. in public admin- istration from North Carolina State University.

APPENDIX F 293 Tammara Soma is an assistant professor at the School of Resource and Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University, a registered pro- fessional planner (MCIP, RPP), and the research director and cofounder of the Food Systems Lab, the first social innovation lab to tackle food waste in Canada. Her research focuses on issues pertaining to food system plan- ning, food waste, community-based research, waste management, and the circular economy. One of her major studies investigated the factors that influence urban household food consumption and food wasting practices in Indonesia and the ways in which food systems consideration can improve urban planning decision making as it relates to food waste management. She recently co-led a tri-country team from the United States, Mexico, and Canada to develop a toolkit for youth engagement in food loss and food waste reduction for the Commission for Environmental Cooperation. She is a co-editor of the Routledge Handbook of Food Waste and has a Ph.D. in planning from the University of Toronto. Gail Tavill is president of Packaging & Food Systems Sustainability Con- sulting, providing independent advice on product development and food systems research and development, packaging, nutrition, sustainability, and corporate social responsibility. Previously, she served as vice president of corporate social responsibility and sustainability at Conagra Brands. Her interests include food waste reduction, packaging systems sustainabil- ity, supply chain traceability and transparency and sustainable diets. She cochaired the Food Waste Reduction Alliance (FWRA) on behalf of the Grocery Manufacturers Association members for several years, contributing to the publication of the first FWRA best practices guide. She also served on the board of directors of Forgotten Harvest in Detroit, the nation’s largest food rescue nonprofit organization, promoting innovation in food donation. She also cofounded and served as president and on the board of directors of AMERIPEN, an industry trade association that advocates for science-based policies related to packaging and the environment. She is a recipient of an Edison award, which honors innovations and innovators. She has a B.S. in packaging from Michigan State University and an M.S. in environmental management from the Stuart School of Business at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

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Approximately 30 percent of the edible food produced in the United States is wasted and a significant portion of this waste occurs at the consumer level. Despite food's essential role as a source of nutrients and energy and its emotional and cultural importance, U.S. consumers waste an estimated average of 1 pound of food per person per day at home and in places where they buy and consume food away from home. Many factors contribute to this waste—consumers behaviors are shaped not only by individual and interpersonal factors but also by influences within the food system, such as policies, food marketing and the media. Some food waste is unavoidable, and there is substantial variation in how food waste and its impacts are defined and measured. But there is no doubt that the consequences of food waste are severe: the wasting of food is costly to consumers, depletes natural resources, and degrades the environment. In addition, at a time when the COVID-19 pandemic has severely strained the U.S. economy and sharply increased food insecurity, it is predicted that food waste will worsen in the short term because of both supply chain disruptions and the closures of food businesses that affect the way people eat and the types of food they can afford.

A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level identifies strategies for changing consumer behavior, considering interactions and feedbacks within the food system. It explores the reasons food is wasted in the United States, including the characteristics of the complex systems through which food is produced, marketed, and sold, as well as the many other interconnected influences on consumers' conscious and unconscious choices about purchasing, preparing, consuming, storing, and discarding food. This report presents a strategy for addressing the challenge of reducing food waste at the consumer level from a holistic, systems perspective.

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