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Evaluating Strategies for Work Zone Transportation Management Plans (2020)

Chapter: Appendix B Strategy Cross-Reference Matrix

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Strategy Cross-Reference Matrix." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluating Strategies for Work Zone Transportation Management Plans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Strategy Cross-Reference Matrix." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluating Strategies for Work Zone Transportation Management Plans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Strategy Cross-Reference Matrix." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluating Strategies for Work Zone Transportation Management Plans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Strategy Cross-Reference Matrix." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Evaluating Strategies for Work Zone Transportation Management Plans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25930.
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B-1 Appendix B―Strategy Cross-reference Matrix Strategy Cost Cross Reference Type Potential Benefit Notes High Traffic Volume Low Traffic Volume Interstates /Freeways Multi- lane Divided Facilities Two- lane, two- way Urban Areas Rural Areas Planning and Design Stage Contract Stage In- Construction M* S* CS* PE* W o rk Z o n e S af et y M an ag em en t S tr at eg ie s Work Zone Posted Speed Limit Reduction $ X X X X X X X √ Relationship between speed limits and safety is not well defined. Effect on safety will typically be measurable through safety surrogates. Portable Variable Speed Limit System $$ X X X X X X √ √ Hypothesized to have potential effects on crash reductions, and possibly throughput. Temporary Rumble Strips $ X X X X X X X X X X √ Encourage safer driving behavior Sequential Flashing Warning Lights $ X X X X X X X √ Effect on safety will typically be measurable through safety surrogates. Automated Flagger Assistance Devices $$ X X X X X X √ √ Productivity and efficiency effects would occur if the number of flaggers used can be reduced. Work Zone Intrusion Alarms $ X X X X X X X X X X √ False alarms have limited the effectiveness of this strategy in past assessments. Potential exists to possibly improve worker safety. Movable Traffic Barrier Systems $$$$ X X X X X X X √ √ √ Effects would be computed relative to a barrier use to no barrier. C o rr id o r/ N et w o rk M an ag em en t S tr at eg ie s Lane Merge Systems $$ X X X X X X X X √ √ Mobility and safety effects dependent upon operating condition at lane closure prior to change (extent to which queue jumping occurs). Reversible Lanes $$$ X X X X X X √√ Mobility effects depend on whether positive effects from improving peak direction capacity are offset or exceeded by negative effects of capacity loss in off- peak direction.

B-2 Strategy Cost Cross Reference Type Potential Benefit Notes High Traffic Volume Low Traffic Volume Interstates /Freeways Multi- lane Divided Facilities Two- lane, two- way Urban Areas Rural Areas Planning and Design Stage Contract Stage In- Construction M* S* CS* PE* Ramp Metering $$ X X X X X X √√ √ Effects on customer satisfaction could be positive (for main lane drivers) or negative (for entering drivers). Reduction in vehicle demand could yield reduction in crashes, but could also increase those on other routes if diversion occurs. Truck Restrictions $ X X X X X X X X √ √ Customer satisfaction effects may be positive or negative depending on user group considered (passenger vehicle drivers versus truck drivers). T ra ff ic I n ci d en t M an ag em en t an d E n fo rc em en t S tr at eg ie s Queue Warning System (QWS) $$$ X X X X X X X √ √√ √ Mobility maintained as safety is improved. Work Zone Incident Management Plan $$ X X X X X X X X X √ √√ √ √ Effects dependent on how much strategy improves response time. Temporary Incident Detection and Surveillance System $$ X X X X X X √ √√ √ Effects dependent on how much strategy improves response time and reduction in secondary crashes. Tow/Freeway Service Patrols $$ X X X X X √ √√ √ Possible reduction in secondary crashes Traffic Screens (aka Glare Screens aka Gawk Screens) $ X X X X X √ √ Potential to reduce driver distraction. Automated Speed Enforcement $$ X X X X X √√ Limited applicability to due legislative changes required. Police Enforcement $$ X X X X X X X √√ Effects on mobility, customer satisfaction, productivity and efficiency may be positive if presence leads to more consistent speeds and improved driving behavior around work zone, or negative if enforcement efforts are too aggressive.

B-3 Strategy Cost Cross Reference Type Potential Benefit Notes High Traffic Volume Low Traffic Volume Interstates /Freeways Multi- lane Divided Facilities Two- lane, two- way Urban Areas Rural Areas Planning and Design Stage Contract Stage In- Construction M* S* CS* PE* D em an d M an ag em en t S tr at eg ie s Strategies to Shift Mode of Travel $$$$ X X X X X X √ √ √ √ Mobility effects dependent on ability to shift mode choice. Reduction in vehicle demand could yield reduction in crashes. Productivity and efficiency effects would exist if mobility improvements assist materials and equipment delivery. Strategies to Shift Time of Travel $ X X X X X X √√ √ √ √ Mobility effects dependent on ability to shift departure times. Productivity and efficiency effects would exist if mobility improvements assist materials and equipment delivery. C o n tr o l S tr at eg ie s Full Road Closure $$ X X X X X X √√ Impacts of full closures on mobility and safety measures throughout corridor may be positive or negative, and would need to be measured against other traffic-handling options available. Strategy would be expected to improve worker safety. Night Work $$ X X X X X X X X √√ √ √ Working at night can have negative worker and productivity/efficiency effects if not performed correctly. Two-way traffic on one side of divided facility (crossover) $$ X X X X X X X X X √ √ Effects evaluated relative to part-width construction on each side of facility. P ro je ct C o o rd in at io n Project Coordination $ X X X X X X X X X X √√ √ √√ Effects depend on how coordination affects duration of conditions impacting mobility and safety. In n o v at iv e C o n tr ac ti n g a n d C o n st ru ct io n S tr at eg ie s Design-Build Contracting Method $$$ X X X X X X X √√ Effects on safety, mobility, and customer satisfaction depend on quality of other TMP strategies implemented. Construction Manager / General Contractor (CMGC) $$ X X X X X √ Allow for fast tracking of design and construction activities. Cost-Plus-Time (A+B) Selection Method $$ X X X X X √√ √√ √ √√ Allows for innovation, shorter delivery time. Incentive / Disincentive Clauses $$ X X X X X √√ √√ √ √√ Minimizes impacts, earlier completion date. No Excuse Incentive (NEI) $$ X X X X X √√ √√ √ √√ Minimizes impacts, earlier completion date.

B-4 Strategy Cost Cross Reference Type Potential Benefit Notes High Traffic Volume Low Traffic Volume Interstates /Freeways Multi- lane Divided Facilities Two- lane, two- way Urban Areas Rural Areas Planning and Design Stage Contract Stage In- Construction M* S* CS* PE* Lane Rental $$ X X X X X √√ √√ √ Effects on productivity and efficiency may be negative if contractor is not able to efficiently fit tasks within allowable work windows. Value Engineering X X X X X X X X √ Improve value of project. In n o v at iv e C o n st ru ct io n S tr at eg ie s Accelerated Construction $$$$ X X X X X √ √ √ √√ Reduce project construction time, cost, and RUC. T ra ff ic C o n tr o l D ev ic es Smart Arrow Boards $$ X X X X X X X X X X √ √ √ √√ Potential to provide real time information to public and DOT. Lighting Devices $$ X X X X X X X X X √ √ Effect on safety will typically be measurable through safety surrogates. M o to ri st I n fo rm at io n S tr at eg ie s Speed Feedback Signs $$ X X X X X X X X X X √√ √ √√ √ Ability to estimate what would happen if signs are not used. Productivity and efficiency effects would exist if mobility improvements assist materials and equipment delivery. Construction Truck Entering and Exit System $$ X X X X X X X √ Effect on safety will typically be measurable through safety surrogates. Real-time Travel System $$$ X X X X X X X X √√ √ √ Effect on safety and mobility will typically be measurable through related surrogates. P u b li c A w ar en es s S tr at eg ie s Program-level Public Information and Outreach Campaigns $$ X X X X X X X X X √ √ √ Effect on safety will typically be measurable through surrogates. Project-Level Public Information Strategies $$ X X X X X X X X X √ √ √√ Effect on safety will typically be measurable through surrogates. * M: Mobility; S: Safety; CS: Customer Satisfaction; PE: Agency/Contractor Productivity and Efficiency Cost: Low ($) to High ($$$$)

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Transportation management plans (TMPs) are a set of coordinated strategies designed to help agencies achieve work zone project goals related to traffic mobility, efficient system operation, motorist and worker safety, and other operational targets.

The TRB National Cooperative Highway Research Program'sNCHRP Web-Only Document 276: Evaluating Strategies for Work Zone Transportation Management Plans focuses on the field evaluations that are part of NCHRP Research Report 945: Strategies for Work Zone Transportation Management Plans.

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