National Academies Press: OpenBook

Options for Reducing Lead Emissions from Piston-Engine Aircraft (2021)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Reducing Lead Emissions from Piston-Engine Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26050.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Reducing Lead Emissions from Piston-Engine Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26050.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Reducing Lead Emissions from Piston-Engine Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26050.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Reducing Lead Emissions from Piston-Engine Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26050.
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PREPUBLICATION COPY – Uncorrected Proofs 113 Appendix A Committee Member Biographies Amy R. Pritchett, Chair, is a professor and the head of the Department of Aerospace Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University. Previously, Dr. Pritchett was on the faculty of the Schools of Aerospace Engineering and Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and she served via the Intergovernmental Personnel Act as the director of NASA’s Aviation Safety Program for 2 years. Her research focuses on the intersection of technology, expert human performance, and aerospace operations, with a particular focus on designing to support safety. Dr. Pritchett’s research topics have included autonomous flight and unmanned aerial vehicles, vehicle dynamics and controls, and vehicle systems engineering. Sheis a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society . Dr. Pritchett has received the AIAA Lawrence Sperry Award, the RTCA William Jackson Award, and, as a member of the Executive Committee of the Commercial Aviation Safety Team, the 2008 Collier Trophy. She has served on many National Academies’ committees, including chair of the Committee for a Study of FAA Air Traffic Controller Staffing and as a member of the Committee on Assessing the Risks of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration, and Committee of the Federal Aviation Administration Research Plan on Certification of New Technologies into the National Airspace System. In addition, Dr. Pritchett served as a member of the National Academies’ Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. She earned a ScD, SM, and SB in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT. Brian J. German is the National Institute of Aerospace Langley Associate Professor in the Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is also the founding director of the Georgia Tech Center for Urban and Regional Air Mobility. Dr. German’s research involves aircraft design and optimization, including development of multidisciplinary optimization techniques. He also develops aerodynamic, propulsion, and performance models suitable for aircraft conceptual and preliminary design studies. A recent focus of his work has been aircraft design and operations for new forms of urban and regional air mobility, with emphasis on aircraft sizing, aerodynamics of distributed propulsion, battery and hybrid electric propulsion modeling, and operations research problems for innovative scheduled and on-demand air services. Dr. German is a recipient of the NSF CAREER award and an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). He received a PhD, MS, and BS in aerospace engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Jack D. Griffith is the Kenan Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology in the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. Previously, at Caltech he developed electron microscopic (EM) methods for visualizing bare DNA bound by proteins and used this to visualize replicating DNA complexes. At Stanford, he obtained the first images of the basic chromatin particle termed a nucleosome and determined the amount of DNA in the nucleosome. At UNC his group combined EM and biochemistry to examine recombining DNAs, the nature of triplet repeat disease DNA, and the architecture of moving replication forks. In 1999 he demonstrated that the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes are

PREPUBLICATION COPY – Uncorrected Proofs 114 arranged into a loop and that looping hides the DNA ends from being recognized as simple double strand DNA breaks. This discovery provided the answer to a question first raised 80 years ago when telomeres were identified and shown to protect chromosome ends. However, the way in which protection was accomplished at a molecular level remained unknown until Dr. Griffith’s discovery of telomere looping. His contributions have been acknowledged by the Herbert A. Sober award from the Associated Societies for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Grand Gold Medal of Comenius University. Dr. Griffith was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2006 and the National Academy of Sciences in 2018. Relevant to this study panel, Dr. Griffith holds Single Engine Land, Single Engine Sea , and Instrument ratings. He owns and flies a Piper Super Cub in North Carolina and in his home state of Alaska on floats. He received a PhD in biophysics from Caltech and was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford with Nobel Prize winner Arthur Kornberg. Kimberly A. Kenville is a professor of aviation at the University of North Dakota, focusing on airport management. The university owns and operates more than 120 piston and turbine- powered aircraft and helicopters with training sites in North Dakota and Arizona. Previously, she worked for Detroit (DTW), Milwaukee (MKE), and Minneapolis airports in the airport operations department. Dr. Kenville has completed several Transportation Research Board Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) projects that pertain specifically to airports and their response and recovery to emergencies, social media, funding industrial aviation development, aviation education, strategic planning, and organizational effectiveness. She chaired the ACRP Project Panel on Updating the Guidebook for Managing Small Airports and is a member of the ACRP Oversight Committee. Dr. Kenville recently served as chair of the North Dakota Aeronautics Commission and is a current voting member of the commission. She is a private aircraft pilot. She received a PhD in organization and management from Capella University. Marie Lynn Miranda is the provost and a professor of computational mathematics and statistics at the University of Notre Dame. Previously, she served as a professor of statistics and the Howard R. Hughes Provost at Rice University. In addition, she was Samuel A. Graham Dean in the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan and Director of Undergraduate Programs for the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. Dr. Miranda specializes in research on environmental health, especially how the environment shapes health and well-being among children. Her research topics include a geospatial analysis of the effects of aviation gasoline on childhood blood lead levels. She is the founding director of the Children’s Environmental Health Initiative, a research, education, and outreach program committed to fostering environments where all people can prosper. The initiative’s peer- reviewed research has been cited extensively, including in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) integrated science assessment on revisions to the national ambient air quality standards for lead. Dr. Miranda received a PhD in economics from Harvard University. Robert A.K. (Bob) Mitchell is an independent aerospace researcher and consultant. Previously, he served as vice president for Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems and the chief executive officer of Teledyne Ryan Aeronautical, prior to its acquisition by Northrop Grumman. He led the capture and development of the Global Hawk high-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aircraft system (UAS), the Fire Scout vertical UAS, the Navy Triton UAS (derived from Global Hawk),

PREPUBLICATION COPY – Uncorrected Proofs 115 and several restricted programs. Prior to taking over Teledyne Ryan Aeronautical, Mr Mitchell spent 12 years working on the Space Shuttle. Mr. Mitchell is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and he has received numerous other awards for his contributions in the field of aerospace, including the Reed Award from AIAA. He attended the Royal Air Force College, Cranwell, was commissioned, became a pilot, and served 16 years. Mr. Mitchell received an MS in astronautical engineering from the USAF Institute of Technology at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Glenn W. Passavant recently retired from Ingevity Corporation as a senior engineer in Technology and Regulatory Affairs, focusing on the advancement of vehicle evaporative and refueling emission control technology. Previously, he was Center Director and senior program manager with the EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality, where he led development of regulatory programs related to a wide variety of mobile sources, including passenger cars, light trucks, motorcycles, heavy-duty engines, marine vessels, nonroad equipment, locomotives, and aircraft. In this capacity, he represented EPA in interactions with government and industry and led the development and assessment of provisions for vehicles/equipment, their fuels, related test procedures, and other necessary regulatory requirements. He worked on EPA’s evaluation of lead emissions impacts from general aviation aircraft that use leaded aviation gasoline to determine whether those emissions cause or contribute to air pollution which may endanger public health or welfare. He had a long career in the USAF in the positions of meteorologist, bioenvironmental engineer, and squadron commander. Mr. Passavant received an ME in environmental engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Bernard I. Robertson is retired senior vice president, Engineering Technologies and Regulatory Affairs, and general manager-Truck Operations at the Daimler Chrysler Corporation. His primary research interests are ground vehicles, their fuels and supporting infrastructure. A particular specialty has been emissions and environmental impact, including development of powertrain and fuel technology. While involved in all aspects of vehicle design and development, he has focused on alternate powerplant and fuel research and development worldwide. He has relevant technical experience in gasoline-fueled engines and all aspects of aviation. Mr. Robertson is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. His previous service on National Academies committees includes the Committee on Review of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Research Program and the Committee for Stakeholder Input in Developing the Airport System Management Services Component of the National Airspace System. In addition, he served as a member of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. He has been a general aviation pilot and aircraft owner for 40 years. Mr. Robertson received an MEng in mechanical sciences from the University of Cambridge, an MS in automotive engineering from the Chrysler Institute of Engineering, and an MBA from Michigan State University. Jay R. Turner is a professor of energy, environmental and chemical engineering, and vice dean for education in the James McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis. His research primarily focuses on air quality characterization with emphasis on field measurements and data analysis to support a variety of applications in the atmospheric science, regulation and policy, emissions estimation, exposure assessment, and health studies arenas. He was co-investigator and Washington University lead on two ACRP projects awarded to Sierra

PREPUBLICATION COPY – Uncorrected Proofs 116 Research: Quantifying Aircraft Lead Emissions at Airports (02-34); and Reducing the Impact of Lead Emissions at Airports (02-57). He is currently the principal investigator (PI) for a UNICEF- funded project in Mongolia to develop air quality monitoring systems for children’s health and is co-PI for three National Institutes of Health–funded projects to: examine relationships between air pollution and neurodegenerative disease; conduct passive and mobile platform measurements to assess the air quality impacts of a neighborhood-scale greening intervention; and develop and deploy a high-time resolution monitor for mobile mapping of volatile organic compounds. In the last 2 years, he was also PI for a Federal Highway Administration/Department of Transportation–funded project to quantify the efficacy of an engineered vegetative buffer to attenuate near-road air pollution. Dr. Turner currently serves on EPA’s chartered Science Advisory Board (SAB) and recently chaired the SAB panel for Screening Methodologies to Support Risk and Technology Reviews: A Case Study Analysis. Dr. Turner is a past president of American Association for Aerosol Research. He received a DSc in chemical engineering from Washington University. Asciatu J. Whiteside is an environmental program manager with Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport’s Department of Environmental Affairs. She has worked at DFW for more than 18 years assisting the airport to become a leader in environmental performance and sustainability through the management of core programs, including Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Waste Management Program, Pretreatment, Storm Water, and Environmental Management Systems. She also provides environmental oversight and technical support for Capital Improvement Projects related to rehabilitating airport infrastructure, including deicing collection systems. In addition, she coordinates and communicates airport programs, public outreach, compliance-related initiatives, sustainability and Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design–related goals and objectives to internal stakeholders, airport tenants, and regulators. Ms. Whiteside has served on several TRB ACRP projects involving water quality toxicity testing and winter weather operations at airports. She holds an MS in environmental science and management from Duquesne University and a BS in chemistry from Emory University.

Next: Appendix B: Open-Session Meeting Agendas »
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Small gasoline-powered aircraft are the single largest emitter of lead in the United States, as other major emission sources such as automobile gasoline have been previously addressed. A highly toxic substance that can result in an array of negative health effects in humans, lead is added to aviation gasoline to meet the performance and safety requirements of a sizable portion of the country’s gasoline-powered aircraft.

Significantly reducing lead emissions from gasoline-powered aircraft will require the leadership and strategic guidance of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and a broad-based and sustained commitment by other government agencies and the nation’s pilots, airport managers, aviation fuel and service suppliers, and aircraft manufacturers, according to a congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

While efforts are underway to develop an unleaded aviation fuel that can be used by the entire gasoline-powered fleet, the uncertainty of success means that other steps should also be taken to begin reducing lead emissions and exposures, notes the report, titled TRB Special Report 336: Options for Reducing Lead Emissions from Piston-Engine Aircraft.

Piston-engine aircraft are critical to performing general aviation (GA) functions like aerial observation, medical airlift, pilot training, and business transport. Other GA functions, such as crop dusting, aerial firefighting, search and rescue, and air taxi service, have particular significance to communities in rural and remote locations.

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