National Academies Press: OpenBook

Options for Reducing Lead Emissions from Piston-Engine Aircraft (2021)

Chapter: Appendix B: Open-Session Meeting Agendas

« Previous: Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies
Page 117
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open-Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Reducing Lead Emissions from Piston-Engine Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26050.
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Page 117
Page 118
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open-Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Reducing Lead Emissions from Piston-Engine Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26050.
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Page 118
Page 119
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open-Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Reducing Lead Emissions from Piston-Engine Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26050.
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Page 119

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PREPUBLICATION COPY – Uncorrected Proofs 117 Appendix B Open-Session Meeting Agendas Committee on Lead Emissions from Piston-Powered General Aviation Aircraft First Meeting: November 19-20, 2019 National Academy of Sciences Building 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418 Tuesday, November 19, NAS Board Room 8:00-9:45 AM EXECUTIVE SESSION: Only for Committee Members and National Academies Staff OPEN SESSION 10:00 Opening Remarks and Introduction of Committee Members Amy Pritchett, Committee Chair 10:10 Topic I. Charge from Congress and Regulatory Context of Task Monica Merritt (FAA) and Marion Hoyer (EPA) 11:05 Topic II. Ambient Lead Concentrations Marion Hoyer (EPA) 11:45 Lunch break 12:45 Panel Discussion on Topic II Moderator: Amy Pritchett Discussants: Philip Fine (South Coast Air Quality Management District, CA, Amanda Giang (University of British Columbia), Marion Hoyer (EPA) 1:45 Topic III. Fuel Alternatives Mark Rumizen (FAA) and Boyd Rodeman (FAA) 2:25 Break 2:40 Panel Discussion on Topic III Moderator: Amy Pritchett Discussants: Chris D’Acosta (Swift Fuels), Doug Macnair (Experimental Aircraft Association), Ryan Manor (Phillips 66), Mark Rumizen (FAA), Boyd Rodeman (FAA), Tim Shea (Shell) 3:40 Opportunity for Public Comment

PREPUBLICATION COPY – Uncorrected Proofs 118 Each commenter will have a maximum time limit of 3 to 5 minutes. Accompanying written materials are encouraged. 4:10 End of open session 4:25 EXECUTIVE SESSION: Only for Committee Members and National Academies Staff Wednesday, November 20, NAS Lecture Room OPEN SESSION 8:30 Opening Remarks and Introduction of Committee Members Amy Pritchett, Committee Chair 8:35 Topic IV. Potential Mitigation Measures Warren Gillette (FAA) 9:15 Panel Discussion on Topic IV Moderator: Amy Pritchett Discussants: Warren Gillette (FAA), Marion Hoyer (EPA), Ryan Manor (Phillips 66), Boyd Rodeman (FAA) 10:15 End of Open Session 10:30 EXECUTIVE SESSION: Only for Committee Members and National Academies Staff Second Meeting: February 18-19, 2020 National Academy of Sciences Building 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418 Tuesday, February 18, NAS Room 125 8:00 AM-12:30 PM EXECUTIVE SESSION: Only for Committee Members and National Academies Staff OPEN SESSION 12:45 Opening Remarks and Introduction of Committee Members Amy Pritchett, Committee Chair 12:50 Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Perspectives on the Committee’s Task Christopher Cooper, AOPA

PREPUBLICATION COPY – Uncorrected Proofs 119 1:20 General Aviation Manufacturers Association Perspectives on the Committee’s Task Lowell Foster (GAMA) and Mike Kraft (Lycoming Engines) 1:50 Panel Discussion of GAMA-Related Issues Moderator: Amy Pritchett Discussants: Raymond Best (Textron Aviation), Walter Desrosier (GAMA), Lowell Foster (GAMA), Jeffrey Knutson (Cirrus Aircraft), Mike Kraft (Lycoming Engines), Jennifer Miller (Lycoming Engines) 2:35 Break 2:50 Recent EPA Reports on Ambient Lead Concentrations and Populations Near U.S. Airports Marion Hoyer, EPA 3:50 National Air Transport Association Perspectives on the Committee’s Task Megan Eisenstein, NATA 4:30 Pilot Education and Training Jeremy Roesler, University of North Dakota (via Internet) 5:10 End of Open Session Wednesday, February 19, NAS 125 OPEN SESSION 8:30 Opening Remarks and Introduction of Committee Members Amy Pritchett, Committee Chair 8:35 Airport Planning and Policy Issues Relevant to the Committee’s Task Elliott Black, FAA 9:50 Basics of Aircraft Certification Boyd Rodeman, FAA 11:05 End of Session

Next: Appendix C: Statutory Provisions (42 U.S.C. 7571-7573 and 49 U.S.C. 44714) »
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Small gasoline-powered aircraft are the single largest emitter of lead in the United States, as other major emission sources such as automobile gasoline have been previously addressed. A highly toxic substance that can result in an array of negative health effects in humans, lead is added to aviation gasoline to meet the performance and safety requirements of a sizable portion of the country’s gasoline-powered aircraft.

Significantly reducing lead emissions from gasoline-powered aircraft will require the leadership and strategic guidance of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and a broad-based and sustained commitment by other government agencies and the nation’s pilots, airport managers, aviation fuel and service suppliers, and aircraft manufacturers, according to a congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

While efforts are underway to develop an unleaded aviation fuel that can be used by the entire gasoline-powered fleet, the uncertainty of success means that other steps should also be taken to begin reducing lead emissions and exposures, notes the report, titled TRB Special Report 336: Options for Reducing Lead Emissions from Piston-Engine Aircraft.

Piston-engine aircraft are critical to performing general aviation (GA) functions like aerial observation, medical airlift, pilot training, and business transport. Other GA functions, such as crop dusting, aerial firefighting, search and rescue, and air taxi service, have particular significance to communities in rural and remote locations.

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