National Academies Press: OpenBook

Practices in Airport Emergency Plans (2021)

Chapter: Airport Codes

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Page 78
Suggested Citation:"Airport Codes." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Practices in Airport Emergency Plans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26077.
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Page 78
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"Airport Codes." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Practices in Airport Emergency Plans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26077.
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Page 79

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78 Airport Codes 21D Lake Elmo Airport ANE Blaine Airport APA Centennial Airport APF Naples Airport ASE Aspen/Pitkin County Airport ATL Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport AUS Austin-Bergstrom International Airport AVL Asheville Regional Airport BOI Boise Airport BUR Hollywood Burbank Airport BVU Boulder City Municipal Airport BWI Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport CLE Cleveland Hopkins International Airport CLT Charlotte Douglas International Airport CVG Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport DCA Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport DEN Denver International Airport DFW Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport DQR Peach Springs Airport DTW Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport DUT Dutch Harbor/Unalaska EFD Ellington Airport FAI Fairbanks International Airport FCM Flying Cloud Airport FLL Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport FWA Fort Wayne International Airport GCN Grand Canyon National Park Airport GEG Spokane International Airport HAS Houston Airport System HEG Herlong Recreational Airport HND Henderson Executive Airport HNL Daniel K. Inouye International Airport HOU William P. Hobby Airport IAD Washington Dulles International Airport IAH George Bush Intercontinental Airport IND Indianapolis International Airport JAX Jacksonville International Airport LAS McCarran International Airport

Airport Codes 79 LAX Los Angeles International Airport LVN Airlake Airport MCO Orlando International Airport MDW Chicago Midway International Airport MEM Memphis International Airport MIC Crystal Airport MSP Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport OAK Oakland International Airport OL7 Jean Sport Aviation Center ORD Chicago O’Hare International Airport PDX Portland International Airport PHL Philadelphia International Airport PHX Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport PIT Pittsburgh International Airport RDU Raleigh-Durham International Airport RNO Reno-Tahoe International Airport SAN San Diego International Airport SAV Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport SBH Gustaf III Airport SDF Louisville International Airport SEA Seattle-Tacoma International Airport SFO San Francisco International Airport SIT Sitka Rocky Gutierrez Airport SNA John Wayne Airport–Orange County STP St. Paul Downtown Airport TPA Tampa International Airport TUL Tulsa International Airport—R. L. Jones, Jr. Airport TYS McGhee Tyson Airport UO8 Perkins Field (also known as Overton Municipal Airport) VGT North Las Vegas Airport VQQ Cecil Airport and Spaceport VUO Pearson Field Airport

Next: Appendix A - References and Bibliography »
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An airport emergency plan (AEP) is meant to support airports in defining roles and responsibilities of stakeholders during emergencies, identifying specific threats that could affect airports, and establishing communication protocols for the airport community.

The TRB Airport Cooperative Research Program's ACRP Synthesis 115: Practices in Airport Emergency Plans gathers relevant data specific to AEP practices that can effectively be applied to other airports, including general aviation airports, whether required to maintain an AEP or not.

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