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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. A Satellite Account to Measure the Retail Transformation: Organizational, Conceptual, and Data Foundations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26101.
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Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. A Satellite Account to Measure the Retail Transformation: Organizational, Conceptual, and Data Foundations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26101.
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Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. A Satellite Account to Measure the Retail Transformation: Organizational, Conceptual, and Data Foundations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26101.
×
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. A Satellite Account to Measure the Retail Transformation: Organizational, Conceptual, and Data Foundations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26101.
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Page 91

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Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Panel Members J. STEVEN LANDEFELD was director of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) for nearly 20 years. Since his retirement, Dr. Landefeld has served as a distinguished visiting professor at the U.S. Naval Academy and as an adviser and consultant to various organizations, including the United Nations, the Committee on National Statistics, and the BEA. His current research focuses on the development of “satellite” accounts that better measure economic well- being by measuring the distribution of production and income, the sustainability of growth, and auxiliary accounts on topics such globalization, energy, the environment, health, human capital, and household production. As director of BEA, Dr. Landefeld led the Bureau in a number of measurement improvements including regular updates using new methodologies and source data to provide more timely and relevant data. Prior to moving to BEA, he was special assistant (chief of staff) for Council of Economic Advisers Chairs Sprinkel and Boskin. Dr. Landefeld has chaired and been a member of United Nations, OECD, IMF, NBER-CRIW, NAS, and other international and national committees. He is a recipient of the President’s Distinguished Executive Award, the NABE and ASA joint Julius Shiskin Award, and other national and international awards. He has regularly published works on economic measurement throughout his career. He has B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in economics, all from the University of Maryland, College Park. CAROL A. CORRADO is research director at the Conference Board in Washington, DC. She also works with the Conference Board’s China Center for Research on Economics and Business. Dr. Corrado is a member of the executive committee of the NBER’s Conference on Research on Income and Wealth and is an organizer of a workshop on economic measurement at the NBER’s annual Summer Institute. She has authored key papers on the macroeconomic analysis of intangible investment and capital, including the winner of the International Association of Research on Income and Wealth’s 2010 Kendrick Prize and a paper in the NBER volume on Measuring Capital in the New Economy. Her research on intangibles and innovation has been cited in Businessweek, The Economist, and the New York Times. Dr. Corrado received the American Statistical Association’s prestigious Julius Shiskin Award for Economic Statistics in 2003 in recognition of her leadership in these areas and was a recipient of a Special Achievement Award from the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in 1998. She has a B.S. degree in management science from Carnegie-Mellon University, and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania. 88

Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs GREGORY DUNCAN is senior principal economist, technologist, and machine learning scientist at Amazon and affiliate professor of economics at the University of Washington. At Amazon, he has worked on addressing numerous econometric and statistical issues throughout the company, including projects related to policy and competition, forecasting, the use of machine learning, and supply chain research. Prior to Amazon, Dr. Duncan held a variety of positions at universities and consulting firms, including the University of California, Berkeley; Huron Consulting Group; Deloitte Financial Advisory Services; National Economic Research Associates; University of Southern California; GTE Laboratories; Washington State University; and Northwestern University. He is also a co-founder of the Amazon Machine Learning University. Dr. Duncan has a B.A. degree in economics from the University of Washington, and an M.A. degree in statistics and a Ph.D. in economics, both from the University of California, Berkeley. TERESA C. FORT is an associate professor of business administration at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. She conducts research in international trade and industrial organization. Her current work analyzes how technology affects firm-level offshoring and production fragmentation decisions, and the impact of these decisions on domestic employment and innovation. Dr. Fort is a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a research affiliate at the Centre for Economic Policy Research. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland, and a B.A. degree from the University of Virginia. JOHN C. HALTIWANGER is a distinguished university professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Maryland, College Park. He also serves as research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, senior research fellow at the Center for Economic Studies at the U.S. Census Bureau, and fellow of the Society of Labor Economics and the Econometric Society. Dr. Haltiwanger is the first recipient of the Dudley and Louisa Dillard Professorship, which was awarded in 2013, and his work with statistical agencies has been recently recognized with him being awarded the Julius Shiskin Award for economic statistics in 2013 and the Roger Herriott Award for innovation in federal statistics in 2014. His own research increasingly uses the data and measures on firm dynamics from a substantial number of advanced, emerging, and transition economies. Dr. Haltiwanger has published more than 100 academic articles and numerous books, including Job Creation and Destruction. He has a Sc.B. in applied mathematics-economics from Brown University, and a Ph.D. in economics from the Johns Hopkins University. DALE W. JORGENSON (NAS) is the Samuel W. Morris university professor in the Department of Economics at Harvard University. Dr. Jorgenson was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal by the American Economic Association and served as its president in 2000. He has been honored with numerous honorary doctorates and with memberships in the American Philosophical Society, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was a founding member of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy of the National Research Council and served as its chairman. Dr. Jorgenson has conducted groundbreaking research on information technology and economic growth, energy and the environment, tax policy and investment behavior, and applied econometrics. He is the author of more than 300 articles in economics and 89

Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs the author and editor of 37 books. He has a B.A. degree in economics from Reed College, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard. MICHAEL MANDEL is chief economic strategist at the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) in Washington, DC, senior fellow at Wharton’s Mack Institute for Innovation Management at the University of Pennsylvania, and fellow at the Manufacturing Policy Initiative at Indiana University. He previously served as chief economist at BusinessWeek. With experience spanning policy, academics, and business, Dr. Mandel has helped lead the public conversation about the economic and business impact of technology for the past two decades. His analysis showing how e-commerce creates jobs was cited in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, and Financial Times, among others. Dr. Mandel has received multiple awards for his work, including the Gerald Loeb Award for Business and Financial Journalism. He taught at New York University’s Stern School of Business and his introductory economics textbook, Economics: The Basics, is currently in its fourth edition. Dr. Mandel holds an A.B. in applied mathematics, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard. KELLY MCCONVILLE is assistant professor of statistics at Reed College, specializing in survey sampling. In her work, she develops survey estimation techniques that combine data collected under a complex sampling design with auxiliary data sources. Dr. McConville has collaborated with the U.S. Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis Program and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. She enjoys teaching her students how to learn from data and introducing them to R (an open source statistical software program) and is a firm believer that undergraduate research enhances the educational experience. Dr. McConville also co-chairs two national programs: the Undergraduate Statistics Project Competition and the Electronic Undergraduate Statistics Research Conference. Dr. McConville has a background in establishment surveys and has previously worked as an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation/Bureau of Labor Statistics research fellow. She has a B.A. degree in mathematics from Saint Olaf College, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Colorado State University. LEONARD I. NAKAMURA is emeritus economist of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, after having served as vice-president and economist for over 30 years. His research addresses financial economics and economic measurement issues, including intangibles, information flows, and free products. Previously, Dr. Nakamura led the research team responsible for producing the Business Outlook Survey, a regional manufacturing survey, and the State Coincident Indexes, as well as other economic indicators. He also served as economist at Citibank and as senior economic consultant for The Conference Board, a global, independent business membership and research association working in the public interest. Dr. Nakamura has taught courses at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, Swarthmore College, and Bryn Mawr College, and was previously a faculty member at Rutgers University. He has a B.A. degree in social sciences from Swarthmore College, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University. WESLEY YUNG is director of the Economic Statistics Methods Division of Statistics Canada. In this role, he manages a division of 110 methodologists who provide support to the Economic Statistics Field of Statistics Canada. Prior to this, he was assistant director of the division, where 90

Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs he managed 40 methodologists who provided support to annual and sub-annual business surveys and to the Tax Data Division. Dr. Yung also served as section chief and senior methodologist at Statistics Canada. While currently in a management position, he continues to remain active in survey methods research touching on variance estimation and, more recently, collection research. Dr. Yung has B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in statistics from Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, and a Ph.D. in statistics from Carleton University in Ontario. 91

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Retail trade has experienced dramatic changes over the past several decades in the United States, with changes in the types of outlets where goods are sold, the nature of the transactions that provide goods to consumers, and the structure of retail operations behind the scenes. The recent changes include the rise of warehouse stores and e-commerce and the further growth of imports and large retail chains. These changes highlight and typify many aspects of the broader evolution of the economy as a whole in recent years - with the growing role of large firms and information technology - while taking place in a sector that directly serves the vast majority of the American population and provides substantial employment.

Despite the everyday experience of these dramatic changes in retail, there is concern that the most transformational aspects of those changes may not be captured well by the economic indicators about the sector. In order to develop appropriate economic policies, we need to be able to capture more detailed data, including data about changes to productivity.

At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, this report evaluates changes in the retail trade sector, assesses measures of employment and labor productivity for the sector, and recommends a new satellite account that could measure retail-related employment and labor productivity in ways that would better capture the transformation.

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