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Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series (2021)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
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C

Biographical Information for
Planning Committee Members

MS. DEBORAH L. WESTPHAL, Chair, is chairman of the board of the strategy advisory firm Toffler Associates. Recognized globally for her expertise in strategy, innovation, and organizational transformation, Ms. Westphal helps organizations understand the forces that drive change in their industries and the world and identifies the best courses of action to create enduring success. Ms. Westphal came to Toffler Associates in 1999 after 13 years as a senior government official in the U.S. Air Force (USAF). Her work in the area of technology and advanced concepts for air vehicles, missiles, and space systems has been recognized with numerous awards from the California Air Force Association (AFA), a USAF Meritorious Civilian Award, an AFA Los Angeles Chapter Civilian of the Year award, and an AFA Medal of Merit. Ms. Westphal has also served on the U.S. Army Science Board, the National Defense Industrial Association Greater Los Angeles Chapter Board of Directors, and the AFA, Schriever Chapter 147 Board of Directors.

LT. GEN. TED F. BOWLDS (USAF, retired) is currently the chief technology officer for IAI North America. In this capacity, he is responsible for program management, engineering, and technology transfer. Prior to this job, Lt. Gen. Bowlds served as the chief information officer (CIO) for FlightSafety, International. As CIO, he was responsible for the planning and execution of a $30 million annual budget and maintained a steady 99.9 percent system reliability. He also served as the chief technology officer responsible for innovation and the introduction of market-leading capabilities. During his 36-year career in the USAF and subsequent experience in industry, he led multiple large-scale, complex procurement activities, each dependent upon strong ethics and solid research foundation. The programs include the F-117 stealth fighter, B-2 bomber, and C-17 transport. As Commander of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), he was responsible for the diverse research undertaken by AFRL ranging from microelectronics, human factors, medical, aeronautics, computers, satellites, and power generation. His last assignment on active duty was as the Commander of the Electronic Systems Center and Program Executive Officer for Air Force information technology procurements, applications, and systems. The portfolio of programs being executed included command and control, surveillance, and information technology. Lt. Gen. Bowlds is a board member of the Air Force Retired Officers Community (a continuing care retirement community) and holds the positions of vice chairman and chairman of the strategic planning committee. He is also a member of the Mississippi State Research Technology Advisory Group, the Department of Defense (DoD) Systems Engineering Research Council, and the Air Force Studies Board. Lt. Gen. Bowlds holds a Master of Science in electrical engineering, a Master of Science in engineering management, and a Ph.D. in systems engineering; he

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
×

is a graduate of the USAF Test Pilot School Flight Test Engineer course and has attended numerous leadership and management courses.

DR. RAMA CHELLAPPA is Bloomberg Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Prior to this role, he was a professor of electrical engineering and an affiliate professor of computer science with the University of Maryland, College Park. He received the B.E. (Hons.) degree from the University of Madras, Madras, India, in 1975, the M.E. (Distinction) degree from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India, in 1977, and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Purdue University in 1978 and 1981, respectively. He is also affiliated with the Center for Automation Research (director) and the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (permanent member). In 2005, he was named a Minta Martin professor of engineering. Prior to joining the University of Maryland, he was an assistant (1981–1986) and associate professor (1986–1991) and director of the Signal and Image Processing Institute (1988–1990) with the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. Over the past 30 years, he has published numerous book chapters, peer-reviewed journal papers, and conference papers. He has coauthored and coedited books on Markov random fields, face and gait recognition, and collected works on image processing and analysis. He has served as a co-editor-in-chief of graphical models and image processing. His current research interests are face and gait analysis, markerless motion capture; 3-D modeling from video, image, and video-based recognition and exploitation, compressive sensing, and hyper spectral processing. Professor Chellappa has received several awards, including a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, four IBM Faculty Development Awards, an Excellence in Teaching Award from the School of Engineering at University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and two paper awards from the International Association of Pattern Recognition. He received the Society, Technical Achievement and Meritorious Service Awards from the IEEE Signal Processing Society. He also received the Technical Achievement and Meritorious Service Awards from the IEEE Computer Society. At the University of Maryland, he was elected as a distinguished faculty research fellow, as a distinguished scholar-teacher, received the outstanding Faculty Research Award and the Poole and Kent Teaching Award for the Senior Faculty from the College of Engineering, an Outstanding Innovator Award from the Office of Technology Commercialization and an Outstanding GEMSTONE Mentor Award. In 2010, he was recognized as an Outstanding ECE by Purdue University. He is a fellow of the IEEE, the International Association for Pattern Recognition, and the Optical Society of America. He has served as an associate editor for four IEEE publications and as the editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence. He served as a member of the IEEE Signal Processing Society Board of Governors and as its vice president of awards and membership. He served as a general and technical program chair for several IEEE international and national conferences and workshops. He is a golden core member of the IEEE Computer Society and served a two-year term as a distinguished lecturer of the IEEE Signal Processing Society. Recently, he completed a 2-year term as president of IEEE Biometrics Council.

DR. JOSEPH (JAE) A. ENGELBRECHT, JR., is president and chief executive officer (CEO) of Engelbrecht Associates LLC, and an advisor and former partner at Toffler Associates. He advises senior executives on practical strategies for business and government for mission success. Dr. Engelbrecht served in the USAF through the rank of Colonel. As an intelligence officer and platoon leader in Vietnam, he led the “Bottleneck” interdiction campaign to slow and destroy traffic on the Ho Chi Min trail. Later he led a multi-staged effort to track tank convoys at night and feed data to recce and “Wolf FACs” to attack armor hidden under canopy by day. He aided Linebacker II targeting before redeploying to Thailand. He also served as an aide-de-camp in Taiwan, a missile and senior standardization-evaluation commander, an Air Force planner, an international political affairs officer, a Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) representative and negotiator, and a war college professor. He was a leader of the SPACECAST 2030 study. Dr. Engelbrecht was the research director of the Chief of Staff of the Air Force’s 2025 Study. His 2025 teams identified 43 new capabilities and the services eventually funded more than 90 percent. Recognizing the increasing value of knowledge systems, study leaders recommended that the USAF expand its vision of Global Reach and Power to include Global Vigilance. As a JCS representative, he advised the U.S. delegation and subsequently led teams negotiating the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START I), and START II,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
×

and then hopped among Geneva, Moscow, Minsk, Kiev, Tokyo, and Washington to devise ways for former Soviet Union states to dismantle their arsenals. He was the U.S. government and JCS policy lead on the first START inspection. President George H.W. Bush commended him, and he became one of the first non-diplomats decorated by the Secretary of State. Next, Dr. Engelbrecht joined Alvin and Heidi Toffler to form Toffler Associates, a strategic advisory firm that helps CEOs, senior executives, and general/flag officers lead their organizations to success in a rapidly changing market and environment. Dr. Engelbrecht has more than 40 years of experience being at the bifurcation point of change and advising executives on how to lead, grow, and succeed in new, emerging conditions. He has advised senior executives in business and government in the United States and around the globe. In the early 1990s, he advised Bell company (now Verizon) executives on the impact of the Internet when much of their business ran on mainframes. He created a future market assessment to quantify the value of modular repairable satellites, a decade before the technology was viable. He also convinced another aerospace giant to lean forward on its technical design for a new satellite constellation to meet emerging customer needs; the firm won the multi-billion-dollar competition. Before “cyber” entered our lexicon, he devised a process for mitigating e-risk or the loss of business caused by cyberattack or disruption for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Anticipating a 9/11 type attack, he advised intelligence agencies on the changing security environment and served with a panel commissioned by the Secretary of Defense and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) Director to design a new remote sensing strategy for the United States. After 9/11, every U.S. intelligence agency sought Dr. Engelbrecht’s advice. He served as executive coach and leadership counsel for the Defense Intelligence Agency, the National Security Agency, the CIA, the National Reconnaissance Agency, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He led the development of a global posture strategy for the National Security Agency that created the initiative to develop a U.S. Cyber Command. Trying to understand how he recognized emerging issues, the CIA asked his team to identify the top 20 issues not on their radar without acknowledging their current efforts; each of the issues Dr. Engelbrecht highlighted inaugurated new agency initiatives. Anticipating the challenges later posed by conflicts in the Middle East, he advised the Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps on how to build “deep coalitions” among governments, global firms, nongovernmental organizations, military elements, and local organizations to rapidly adapt and shape approaches for emerging problems that span boundaries and traditional lanes in the road to the future. Dr. Engelbrecht earned a B.A. in east Asian history and Chinese from the University of Maryland, an M.A. in public administration from the University of Northern Colorado, and a Master of Philosophy and a Ph.D. in international relations and political science from Columbia University. He completed the leadership and executive development program at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. Dr. Engelbrecht is a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies and the World Futures Society, and a life member of the AFA and the National Eagle Scout Association. He is the author of Alternate Futures for 2025 and multiple articles including in Space Imaging, Earth Imaging Journal, Military Operations Research Society (MORS), Interfaces, Airpower Journal (Netherlands), and the Symposium on Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (Canada) and has been interviewed for such publications as Fortune, The Washington Post, and Generation (Turkey). Dr. Engelbrecht has assessed leadership, executive decision making, and strategy processes and advised executives at organizations including Verizon, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrup Grumman, Raytheon, Harris, Levi, 3M, XEROX, Freddie Mac, Fannie Mae, Motorola, HP, Microsoft, AT&T, the U.S. Postal Service, the Government Accountability Organization, Army Corps of Engineers, each of the U.S. military services and the top seven U.S. intelligence agencies, as well as dozens of nonprofits and nongovernmental organizations.

DR. BRENDAN GODFREY is a visiting senior research scientist at the University of Maryland, where he conducts studies on numerical simulation of plasmas, participates in committees of the National Academy of Sciences, and served as advisor to the U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research. Previously, he was director of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, responsible for its nearly half-billion-dollar basic research program. He was an Air Force officer at Kirtland Air Force Base from 1970 to 1972, performing plasma research. He began his civilian career at Los Alamos National Laboratory, establishing its intense particle beam research program. He then managed and conducted intense microwave and particle beam research at Mission Research Corp., becoming vice president and regional manager. In 1989, he returned to the Air Force as civilian chief scientist of the Weapons Laboratory. Later responsibilities included director of Phillips Laboratory high power microwave research; director

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
×

of the 1,500-person Armstrong Laboratory; director of plans at AFRL, and deputy director of Brooks City-Base. Known for his contributions to computational plasma theory and applications, he is author of more than 200 publications and reports. He also has served on numerous professional and civic committees. Dr. Godfrey received his B.S. from the University of Minnesota and Ph.D. from Princeton University. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and of the American Physical Society.

DR. RICHARD P. HALLION is senior advisor with the Science and Technology Policy Institute. Dr. Hallion received his B.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Maryland. He also graduated from executive training programs at the Federal Executive Institute and the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. He has been a curator at the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution; a historian with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the USAF; a policy analyst for the Secretary of the Air Force; senior advisor for air and space issues, for the Air Force’s Directorate for Security, Counterintelligence, and Special Programs; special advisor for aerospace technology, for the Air Force Chief Scientist; and was a founding trustee of Florida Polytechnic University. He also serves as a research associate in aeronautics for the National Air and Space Museum and is a member of the executive committee of the U.S. Air Force Armament Museum. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and a fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

DR. DANIEL HASTINGS is department head, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a professor of aeronautics and astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Hastings, who earned a Ph.D. and an S.M. from MIT in aeronautics and astronautics in 1980 and 1978 respectively, received a B.A. in mathematics from Oxford University in England in 1976. He joined the MIT faculty as an assistant professor in 1985, advancing to associate professor in 1988 and full professor in 1993. As professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems, Dr. Hastings has taught courses and seminars in plasma physics, rocket propulsion, advanced space power and propulsion systems, aerospace policy, technology and policy, and space systems engineering. Dr. Hastings served as chief scientist to the USAF from 1997 to 1999. In that role, he served as chief scientific adviser to the chief of staff and the secretary and provided assessments on a wide range of scientific and technical issues affecting the Air Force mission. He was the chair of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board from 2002 to 2005. He led several influential studies on where the Air Force should invest in space, global energy projection, and options for a science and technology workforce for the 21st century. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of AIAA, the International Astronautical Federation, and the International Council on Systems Engineering.

MR. DAVID MARKHAM is managing director at Waywest Advisors. Since joining Waywest Advisors in February 2018, Mr. Markham’s responsibilities include board roles; strategic markets for pursuit and growth; inorganic targeting of capability and capacity to accelerate growth; closing strategies to close acquisitions (approximately $500 million in the first half of 2020); technology scouting for emerging first and innovators for horizon investment consideration; aiding site developers on a national security property with aligned firms in the concept, design and build, and contract for occupancy. Mr. Markham retired in 2018 as the vice president at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Advance Programs and New Ventures. While at Lockheed Martin, he was responsible for developing and maturing systems concepts, technology innovation and business modes for investment opportunities. Areas of interest were in cutting edge capabilities in surveillance, communications, data collection, sense making and information exploitation, and global access to space. Investment strategies ranged from venture, corporate strategic, international, governmental and regional economic development incentives. Mr. Markham also served as the director of strategic planning and president of commercial launch services, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company from September 2006 to February 2011. Mr. Markham received a bachelor’s degree in finance from Fort Lewis College. He is a graduate of executive development programs at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management; the University of California, Los Angeles, Anderson School of Management; and University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. He completed the Harvard Program for senior executives in national and international security. Mr. Markham serves as a board member of Fort Lewis School of Business.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
×

GEN. GREGORY MARTIN (USAF, retired) is currently a consultant at GS Martin Consulting, Inc. Gen. Martin retired from Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, as commander on September 1, 2005. He oversaw the research, development, test, and evaluation, and provided acquisition management services and logistics support necessary to keep Air Force weapon systems ready for war. He earned a B.S. in geography from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1970 and an M.S. in business management from Central Michigan University in 1977. He entered the Air Force in June 1970 with a commission from the U.S. Air Force Academy. In addition to flying 161 combat missions in Southeast Asia, he commanded the 67th Tactical Fighter Squadron, the 479th Tactical Training Wing, and the 33rd and 1st fighter wings. He also served as Vice Director of the Joint Staff’s Force Structure and Resources Directorate, Director of Operational Requirements for the USAF, and Principal Deputy to the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition. Before assuming his last position, Gen. Martin served as the Commander of U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Allied Air Forces Northern Europe. Gen. Martin is a command pilot with more than 4,600 flying hours in various aircraft, including the F-4, F-15, C-20, and C-21.

DR. WILLIAM F. POWERS retired as vice president-research from Ford Motor Company on December 31, 2000; he had been with the company since 1979. During his career at Ford, he served as the first director of Product and Manufacturing Systems in North American Automotive Operations; program manager, Car Product Development Specialty Car Programs, where he was responsible for the Thunderbird, Cougar, and Mark VIII vehicles; and executive director of Information Technology. On February 1, 1996, he assumed the responsibilities of vice president-research. Dr. Powers received his B.S. in aerospace engineering in 1963 from the University of Florida and his Ph.D. in engineering mechanics in 1968 from the University of Texas at Austin. At NASA Marshall Space Flight Center from 1960 to 1965, he was involved with the development of the Saturn Booster guidance system and Apollo mission analyses. He consulted on the Space Shuttle Program with the NASA Johnson Space Center during the period 1970–1979, where he developed a methodology for optimizing the temperature constrained shuttle reentry trajectory. From 1968 to 1980, he was a professor of aerospace engineering and computer, information, and control engineering at the University of Michigan, where he chaired 15 Ph.D. theses. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (1993); a fellow of IEEE (1992); the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (2001); the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) (2005, inaugural class of IFAC Fellows); the Society of Automotive Engineers (2002); the Intelligent Transportation Systems of America Hall of Fame (2015); and a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (1992). He has served on the Sandia Nuclear Weapons External Advisory Board (now the Nuclear Deterrence External Advisory Board) since 2005, and since retirement has completed a 6-year term on the National Academies’ Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, a 5-year term on the Sandia National Security Advisory Panel, multi-year terms on the Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Operations Board, National Academies’ Committee on Assessment of Resource Needs for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies, the National Academies’ Committee on America’s Energy Future Energy Efficiency Panel, the National Research Council Panel on Review of the Engineering Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Advanced Manufacturing Office Peer Review Committee. He served on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology Working Group on the Energy Technology Innovation System in 2010. He is a member of the New World Angels, which is a group of private investors dedicated to providing equity capital to early-stage entrepreneurial companies in the state of Florida. He has received distinguished alumnus awards from the University of Florida (2001) and the University of Texas at Austin Engineering College (1993), where he has also delivered commencement addresses; the Control Practice Award from the American Automatic Control Council (2004); and the Nichols Medal from the IFAC (2005).

DR. JULIE J.C.H. RYAN is the CEO of Wyndrose Technical Group, having retired from academia in 2017. Her last position in academia was professor of cybersecurity and information assurance at the U.S. National Defense University. Prior to that, she was tenured faculty at The George Washington University and a visiting scholar at NIST. Dr. Ryan came to academia from a career in an industry that began when she left government service. Upon graduating from the U.S. Air Force Academy, Dr. Ryan served as a signals intelligence officer in the Air Force and then as a military intelligence officer with the Defense Intelligence Agency. After moving to industry, she

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
×

worked in a variety of positions, including systems engineer, consultant, and senior staff scientist with companies including Sterling Software, Booz Allen & Hamilton, Welkin Associates, and TRW/ESL. She is the author of several books, including Defending Your Digital Assets Against Hackers, Crackers, Spies, and Thieves (McGraw Hill, 2000), and is a fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. At Wyndrose Technical Group, she focuses on futures forecasting and strategic planning with an eye on technology surprise and disruption. She has been a member of numerous National Academies’ committees including the Committee on Avoiding Technology Surprise for Tomorrow’s Warfighter Symposium and the Committee on Human-Automation Interaction Consideration for Unmanned Aerial System Integration. She holds the degree of D.Sc. in engineering management from The George Washington University.

DR. MICHAEL I. YARYMOVYCH is president of Sarasota Space Associates. Until the end of 2013 he was senior fellow of the Air Force SAB and has served on numerous SAB and Defense Science Board studies. He retired from the Boeing Company in 1998 as vice president of international technology in the Information, Space, and Defense Systems organization. Prior to the merger of Rockwell International with Boeing he was vice president and associate center director of the Systems Development Center, which focused the corporation’s resources on new high technology advanced concepts requiring the skills of many divisions. He had joined Rockwell in 1977 as vice president, engineering of the Aerospace Operations in leadership positions of programs such as the Space Shuttle, Global Positioning System, Ballistic Missile Defense, and the B1B strategic aircraft. He started his engineering career in 1959 at AVCO R&D Division leading projects in electric propelled space systems. In 1962 he joined NASA Headquarters as assistant director of systems engineering in the Apollo project and later moved to the Air Force as technical director of the Air Force Manned Orbital Laboratory, and deputy for requirements to the Assistant Secretary for Research and Development. In 1970 he was posted in Paris as director of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD), which was later changed to be the NATO Research and Technology Organization (RTO). In the 1990s he was elected chairman of AGARD and later of RTO. From 1975 to 1977 he served as the Chief Scientist of the U.S. Air Force, which was followed by a Presidential appointment to be the Assistant Administrator of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration responsible for field operations of the national and government-owned energy (former AEC) laboratories. From 1991 to 1997 Dr. Yarymovych was president of the International Academy of Astronautics, of which he was also vice president for scientific programs since 1985. He is an honorary fellow of the AIAA and recipient of the Distinguished Service Award. He served as president of the AIAA from 1982 to 1983. He is a fellow of the American Astronautical Society and honorary member of the French Air and Space Academy. He is a four-time recipient of the Air Force Exceptional Civilian Service Award, the service’s highest decoration; he also received the ERDA Distinguished Service Award, the Von Karman Medal from the NATO Research and Technology Organization, and the Theodor Von Karman Award from the International Academy of Astronautics. Dr. Yarymovych holds a B.Eng.Sc. in aeronautical engineering magna cum laude, New York University; M.S. in engineering mechanics, Columbia University; and D.Eng.Sc. in engineering mechanics, Columbia University. Dr. Yarymovych is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is the author of many publications on topics ranging from lunar mapping to strategic defense policy. He was the associate editor of the Encyclopedia of Space Science and Technology published by Wiley and Sons in 2003. For several years, he translated the Russian journal Applied Mathematics and Mechanics.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
×
Page 98
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
×
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
×
Page 100
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
×
Page 101
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information for Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Adapting to Shorter Time Cycles in the United States Air Force: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26148.
×
Page 102
Next: Appendix D: Uncertainty, Stability, Instability, Military Affairs, and Time: Some Thoughts and Conjectures »
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The Air Force Studies Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine hosted a three-part workshop series to investigate the changing paradigm of time and knowledge in modern-day warfare. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense, three 2-day workshops were held virtually on September 16-17, 2020, September 23-24, 2020, and October 1-2, 2020. The objective of the first workshop was to explore the ways in which the U.S. Air Force (USAF) has adjusted its capabilities in response to past shifts in operational timing. In consideration of these past shifts, the second workshop aimed to consider when there could be an advantage to synchronize or desynchronize rates of change with adversaries. Participants had the opportunity to discuss lessons learned and possible changes for USAF Doctrine and future operations. The goal of the third workshop was to examine the implications to doctrine, concepts of operations, and command and control from the recent acceleration of battlespace operations, arising from wide-scale digitization, large-scale sensing, and faster technologies. In all three workshops, speakers explored the broader issues surrounding changing environments, and participants discussed ways to adapt to fundamental changes in the time constants of conflict. This proceedings is a factual summary of what occurred during the workshop series.

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