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Resilience Primer for Transportation Executives (2021)

Chapter: APPENDIX A: DEFINITIONS OF RESILIENCE

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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX A: DEFINITIONS OF RESILIENCE." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Resilience Primer for Transportation Executives. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26195.
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Page 29
Page 30
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX A: DEFINITIONS OF RESILIENCE." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Resilience Primer for Transportation Executives. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26195.
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Page 30

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Mutual Resilience Roles Within the Agency 29   Major Realm What Your Employees Need and Expect from You What You Need and Expect from Your Employees Administration/ policy, including finance, procurement, and communications • Include resilience (preparedness— whatever term fits best) in vision and mission. Operationalize in all divisions and employee and stakeholder communications. • Use best-value contracting strategies to ensure projects are designed, constructed, and maintained for the long run rather than for short-term savings. • Communications: research and express the value of resilience to multiple audiences. • Procurement: evaluate and purchase for full life-cycle value; monitor. Emergency preparedness and response • Be personally involved in training and exercises to ensure emergency preparedness receives appropriately high priority in organization and employee work plans. • Ensure that resilience is part of emergency preparedness and response. • Be inclusive and cross-disciplinary in training and exercises. • Include engineering and design teams as well as operations teams in after-action assessments.

30 Additional Useful Resources 100 Resilient Cities. http://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/100-resilient-cities/ 100 Resilient Cities, pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation, helped cities around the world become more resilient to physical, social, and economic challenges. The effort continues through the Global Resilient Cities Network, which maintains the coalition of 100 cities, and the Resilience Cities Catalyst, which implements resilience projects with a more nimble and flexible approach. Climate Change Adaptation Guide for Transportation Systems Management, Operations, and Maintenance. FHWA-HOP-15-026. S. Asam, C. Bhat, B. Dix, J. Bauer, and D. Gopalakrishna. FHWA, U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, DC, 2015. This FHWA report explains how transportation management, operations, and maintenance staff can incorporate climate change into their planning and ongoing activities. The report includes the context and rationale for adaptation and what is being done in state DOTs to adapt transportation systems management and operations as well as maintenance programs. Fundamental Capabilities of Effective All Hazards Infrastructure Protection, Resilience, and Emergency Management for State DOTs. AASHTO, Washington, DC, 2015. This AASHTO report synthesizes the most recent federal/state guidance and industry research into a set of capabilities for state DOTs. It addresses all-hazards infrastructure protection, resilience, and emergency management in support of the National Preparedness Goal. The concise report was designed to be a resource for transportation agencies to support the integration of infrastructure protection and resilience into their operations and infrastructure/ capital programs. “General Management Imperatives: Business Basis for the Business Agility Manifesto.” R. T. Burlton, R. G. Ross, and J. A. Zachman. Business Rule Solutions, LLC, Houston, TX, 2017. https://busagilitymanifesto.org/. This document is a sound foundation for CEO resilience planning. Incorporating Risk Management into Transportation Asset Management Plans. FHWA, U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, DC, 2017. This FHWA document provides guidance on the risk element of the transportation asset management plan (TAMP), defines risk, and provides guidance on how the risk element can be applied to meet risk-based TAMP requirements. It was developed to assist state DOTs with the development of their TAMPs. A P P E N D I X D

Next: APPENDIX B: ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY BENEFITS OF RESILIENCE »
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CEOs of departments of transportation (DOTs) face many challenges, including some that will have serious impacts on people's mobility and safety, and possibly on the tenure of CEOs. Many of these challenges revolve around the resilience of the transportation system—how well it can withstand disruptions from natural causes, catastrophic failures of the infrastructure or cyber events, and how quickly the agency can restore services when they are impacted.

The TRB National Cooperative Highway Research Program's pre-publication draft of NCHRP Research Report 976: Resilience Primer for Transportation Executives provides a quick grounding in resilience benefits, the CEO’s role in resilience, and approaches taken in various states to increase the resilience of their transportation system. It also offers concepts and tools to lead agencies toward greater resilience.

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