National Academies Press: OpenBook

Resilience Primer for Transportation Executives (2021)

Chapter: APPENDIX B: ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY BENEFITS OF RESILIENCE

« Previous: APPENDIX A: DEFINITIONS OF RESILIENCE
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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B: ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY BENEFITS OF RESILIENCE." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Resilience Primer for Transportation Executives. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26195.
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Page 31
Page 32
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B: ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY BENEFITS OF RESILIENCE." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Resilience Primer for Transportation Executives. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26195.
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Page 32

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Additional Useful Resources 31   The Innovative DOT: A Handbook of Policy and Practice. State Smart Transportation Initiative and Smart Growth America. University of Wisconsin–Madison, 2015. The handbook was commissioned by FHWA to assist state DOTs by offering strategies that can be undertaken to improve a state’s transportation system. It contains a section on resilience (pp. 219–223) with guidance on how to incorporate climate change adaptation into long- range transportation planning. Managing Catastrophic Transportation Emergencies: A Guide for Transportation Executives. AASHTO, Washington, DC, 2015. This AASHTO publication provides guidance to new CEOs about the roles and actions that they take during emergency events. It was designed in an executive format—concise and brief—with input from current and former transportation agency executive officers as a quick way to present the decisions and steps that are needed during an emergency event and to assist in identifying the right persons or agencies that need to be involved. The guide also includes staff resources on relevant topics and issues that should be considered in preparing and responding to all-hazards emergency incidents. National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS) Integrated Resilient Design Program. https://www.wbdg.org/resources/good-practices-resilience-based-arch-design. The Integrated Resilient Design Program (IRDP) fosters innovative approaches to the design, construction, and operation of buildings and infrastructures that are resilient to natural and man-made disasters. IRDP projects are sponsored by the High Performance and Integrated Design Resilience (HP&IDR) Program of the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Resilience website. https://www.nist.gov/resilience. NIST examines interdependencies in its resilience section and includes guidance such as building standards. NCHRP Research Report 963/TCRP Research Report 225: A Pandemic Playbook for Transportation Agencies. D. Matherly, P. Bye, and J. Benini. Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC, 2021. http://www.trb.org/Main/Blurbs/182018.aspx. The Playbook concentrates on what needs to be done, when, and by whom. It summarizes effective practices currently used by transportation agencies garnered from interviews with leaders and operational personnel from state departments of transportation and transit agencies and supplemented with the results of national and international research. NCHRP Research Report 970: Mainstreaming System Resilience Concepts into Transportation Agencies: A Guide. C. Dorney, M. Flood, T. Grose, P. Hammond, M. Meyer, R. Miller, E. R. Frazier, Sr., J. L. Western, Y. J. Nakanishi, P. M. Auza, and J. Betak. Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC, 2021. http://www.trb.org/Main/Blurbs/181963.aspx. The guide provides a self-assessment tool for assessing the current status of an agency’s efforts to improve the resilience of the transportation system through the mainstreaming of resilience concepts into agency decision-making and procedures. NCHRP Research Report 975: Transportation System Resilience: Research Roadmap and White Papers. D. R. Fletcher and D. S. Ekern. Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC, 2021. http://www.trb.org/Main/Blurbs/182066.aspx. The report documents an effort to gather and prioritize critical resilience research needs and is intended be an enabling tool to shape research efforts and assist in planning future resilience-related initiatives. White papers on resilience from an environmental, economic, and cyber perspective provide tools for agency leaders.

32 Resilience Primer for Transportation Executives NCHRP Web-Only Document 221/TCRP Web-Only Document 67: Protection of Trans- portation Infrastructure from Cyber Attacks: A Primer. Countermeasures Assessment and Security Experts, LLC, and Western Management and Consulting LLC. Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC, 2016. http://www.trb.org/Main/Blurbs/174382.aspx. This overview of cybersecurity and compendium of effective practices can be used to protect transportation systems from cyber events and to mitigate damage should an attack or breach occur. Risk-Based Transportation Asset Management: Building Resilience into Transportation Assets. Report 5: Managing External Threats Through Risk-Based Asset Management. FHWA, U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, DC, 2013. This FHWA Report, the fifth of five reports examining how risk management complements asset management, examines how physical, climatic, seismic, and other external threats can be addressed in risk-based asset management programs. In managing risks to assets from external threats, this report emphasizes the Three Rs—redundancy, robustness, and resilience. Asset management plays a critical role in each, particularly robustness, and resilience. These are defined, described, and illustrated through several agency examples. TCRP Web-Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 1: A Guide. D. Matherly, J. A. Carnegie, and J. Mobley. Transporta- tion Research Board, Washington, DC, 2017. http://www.trb.org/Main/Blurbs/177007.aspx. The guide documents steps to assist transit agencies as well as other transportation agencies to assess and implement resilience throughout the agency. An associated database provides case studies, tools, and resources.

Next: APPENDIX C: MUTUAL RESILIENCE ROLES WITHIN THE AGENCY »
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CEOs of departments of transportation (DOTs) face many challenges, including some that will have serious impacts on people's mobility and safety, and possibly on the tenure of CEOs. Many of these challenges revolve around the resilience of the transportation system—how well it can withstand disruptions from natural causes, catastrophic failures of the infrastructure or cyber events, and how quickly the agency can restore services when they are impacted.

The TRB National Cooperative Highway Research Program's pre-publication draft of NCHRP Research Report 976: Resilience Primer for Transportation Executives provides a quick grounding in resilience benefits, the CEO’s role in resilience, and approaches taken in various states to increase the resilience of their transportation system. It also offers concepts and tools to lead agencies toward greater resilience.

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