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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Building Data Capacity for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research: Interim Report Two - Data Standards, Methods, and Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26298.
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Page 43
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Building Data Capacity for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research: Interim Report Two - Data Standards, Methods, and Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26298.
×
Page 44
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Building Data Capacity for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research: Interim Report Two - Data Standards, Methods, and Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26298.
×
Page 45
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Building Data Capacity for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research: Interim Report Two - Data Standards, Methods, and Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26298.
×
Page 46
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Building Data Capacity for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research: Interim Report Two - Data Standards, Methods, and Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26298.
×
Page 47

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  PREPUBLICATION COPY, Uncorrected Proofs    APPENDIX A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members     GEORGE ISHAM (NAM) (Chair) is a senior fellow at the HealthPartners Institute and a senior advisor for the Alliance of Community Health Plans. Previously, he served as a senior advisor to the board of directors and the senior management team of HealthPartners, and prior to that, he was HealthPartners’ medical director and chief health officer, responsible for quality of care and health and health care improvement. He has been active in health policy, serving as a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Task Force on Community Preventive Services, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s United States Preventive Services Task Force, as a founding co-chair of the National Committee for Quality Assurance’s committee on performance measurement as well as founding co-chair of the National Quality Forum’s Measurement Application Partnership. He has an M.D. from the University of Illinois at Chicago and an M.S. in preventive medicine and administrative medicine from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. JOHN F.P. BRIDGES is professor and vice chair of academic affairs in the Department of Biomedical Informatics at The Ohio State University (OSU) College of Medicine. He is also a professor in the Department of Surgery and an adjunct professor in both the Division of Epidemiology at the OSU College of Public Health and Department of Health Behavior and Society at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Prior to joining OSU he was on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Department of Tropical Hygiene and Public Health within University of Heidelberg School of Medicine, and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics within the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. He has previously held positions in the Department of Economics at the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University, the National Bureau of Economic Research, Center for Medicine in the Public Interest, and the Center for Health Economics, Research and Evaluation in Australia. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the City University of New York. JULIE BYNUM is the Margaret Terpenning Professor of Medicine in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and vice chair for Faculty Affairs in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan. She is also a research professor in the Institute of Gerontology, Geriatric Center Associate Director for Health Policy and Research, and a member of the Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. She currently leads a portfolio of National Institutes of Health–funded research that examines the quality of care, diagnosis, and treatment of people with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia in the community, nursing homes, and assisted living and is the director of the Center to Accelerate Population Research in Alzhiemer’s. She is currently a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence and was a member of a National Academies committee that authored Vital Signs: Core Metrics for Health and Health Care Progress. She has an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene & Public Health and an M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 43  

  PREPUBLICATION COPY, Uncorrected Proofs    ANGELA DOBES is vice president of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s IBD Plexus Program, a research-information exchange platform designed to centralize data and biosamples from diverse research initiatives to advance science, accelerate precision medicine, and transform the care of IBD patients. She has previously worked for clinical technology and pharmaceutical organizations, where she has led implementation of various technology solutions focused on business optimization and accelerating the delivery of new therapies to patients safely. She is currently serving as principal investigator on a study to enhance engagement, research participation, and collaboration through the IBD Partners Patient Powered Research Network. She has an M.A. in public health from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. OLUWADAMILOLA FAYANJU is the Helen O. Dickens Presidential Associate Professor of Surgery at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. She is also chief of breast surgery at Penn Medicine. Previously, she was associate professor of surgery and population health sciences in the Duke University School of Medicine and director of the Durham VA Breast Clinic. She was also associate director for Disparities & Value in Healthcare with Duke Forge, Duke University’s center for actionable data science. In 2019, she was recognized by the National Academy of Medicine as an Emerging Leader in Health and Medicine Scholar. She received an M.A. in comparative literature from Harvard University and her M.D. and M.P.H.S. from the Washington University in St. Louis. DEBORAH ESTRIN (NAE/NAM) is a professor of computer science at Cornell Tech where she holds the Robert V. Tishman founder’s chair, serves as the associate dean for impact, and is an affiliate faculty at Weill Cornell Medicine. Her research activities include technologies for caregiving, immersive health, small data, participatory sensing, and public interest technology. Estrin was an Amazon Scholar, and before joining Cornell University she was founding director of the National Science Foundation’s Center for Embedded Networked Sensing at the University of California, Los Angeles; pioneering the development of mobile and wireless systems to collect and analyze real-time data about the physical world. Estrin cofounded the nonprofit startup, Open mHealth, and has served on several scientific advisory boards for early-stage mobile health startups. She has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. CONSTANTINE GATSONIS is the Henry Ledyard Goddard University Professor of Statistical Sciences, director of statistical sciences, and professor of biostatistics at Brown University. He was founding director of the Center for Statistical Sciences and founding chair of the Department of Biostatistics at Brown University. He is a leading authority on the evaluation of diagnostic and screening tests and has made major contributions to the development of methods for medical technology assessment and health services and outcomes research. He is a world leader in methods for applying and synthesizing evidence on diagnostic tests in medicine and is currently developing methods for comparative effectiveness research in diagnosis and prediction and radiomics. Since 2016 he has served as a statistical consultant for the New England Journal of Medicine and was the Founding Editor-in-Chief of Health Services and Outcomes Research Methods. He has a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from Cornell University. ROBERT GOERGE is a senior research fellow at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. He is also a senior fellow and founder of the Master’s Degree in Computational Analysis in Public 44  

  PREPUBLICATION COPY, Uncorrected Proofs    Policy at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. His research is focused on improving the available data and information on children and families, particularly those who require specialized services related to maltreatment, disability, poverty, or violence. At Chapin Hall, he is principal investigator for the Family Self-Sufficiency Data Center, the Linking Federal Data to Local Data project, and the National Survey for Early Care and Education. He currently serves on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Committee on National Statistics. He has a Ph.D. in social policy from the University of Chicago. GEORGE HRIPCSAK (NAM) is the Vivian Beaumont Allen Professor and chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University. He is also the director of medical informatics services for New York Presbyterian Hospital. He is also a board-certified internist. He led the effort to create the Arden Syntax, a language for representing health knowledge that has become a national standard. As chair of the American Medical Informatics Association Standards Committee, he coordinated the medical informatics community response to the Department of Health and Human Services for the health informatics standards rules under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. His current research is on the clinical information stored in electronic health records. Using data mining techniques, he is developing the methods necessary to support clinical research and patient safety initiatives. He has an M.D. and an M.S. in biostatistics from Columbia University. LISA IEZZONI (NAM) is professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Health Policy Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, where she served as director in the past. She was previously co-director of research in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Her research focuses on risk adjustment methods for predicting cost and clinical outcomes of care, and on health care experiences and outcomes of persons with disabilities. She has served on the editorial boards of the Annals of Internal Medicine, the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Health Affairs, Medical Care, Health Services Research, and the Disability and Health Journal, among others. She has an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and an M.Sc. from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. S. CLAIBORNE JOHNSTON (NAM) is the inaugural dean of Dell Medical School, vice president for medical affairs, and the Frank and Charmaine Denius Distinguished Dean’s Chair in medical leadership at The University of Texas at Austin. Previously, Johnston was associate vice chancellor for research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He also directed the Clinical and Translational Science Institute and founded the UCSF Center for Healthcare Value. His research is focused on clinical trials and health services research in stroke. He is also an expert in medical education, research administration, health care value, and population health. He has led several large-cohort studies of cerebrovascular disease and three international multicenter randomized trials. He has an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley. MIGUEL MARINO is an associate professor with joint appointments in the School of Public Health Division of Biostatistics and the Department of Family Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University. His research focuses on the development and implementation of novel 45  

  PREPUBLICATION COPY, Uncorrected Proofs    statistical methodology to address complexities associated with the use of electronic health records (EHRs) to study changes in policy; using EHRs to study health disparities; validation of EHRs as a reliable source for observational studies; pragmatic randomized trials; and preventive health maintenance. He was selected by the National Academy of Medicine as an Emerging Leader in Health and Medicine Scholar. He has a Ph.D. in biostatistics from Harvard University. ELIZABETH MCGLYNN (NAM) is vice president for Kaiser Permanente Research and executive director for the Center for Effectiveness & Safety Research at Kaiser Permanente. She is also interim senior associate dean for research and scholarships at the Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson School of Medicine. She is an internationally known expert on methods for evaluating the appropriateness and quality of healthcare delivery. She has led major initiatives to evaluate health reform options under consideration at the federal and state levels. She is the lead of Kaiser Permanente & Strategic Partners Patient Outcomes Research To Advance Learning (PORTAL) Network. She was a member of the Strategic Framework Board, which provided a blueprint for the National Quality Forum on the development of a national quality measurement and reporting system. She chaired the board of AcademyHealth, served on the board of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation, and served on the Board of Providence-Little Company of Mary Hospital Service Area in Southern California. She has a Ph.D. in public policy from RAND Graduate School. DAVID MELTZER (NAM) is the Fanny L. Pritzker Professor in the Department of Medicine, chief of the section of Hospital Medicine and faculty in the Department of Economics and Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago. He is also director of the Center for Health and the Social Sciences and of the Urban Health Lab at the University of Chicago. His research explores problems in health economics and public policy with a focus on the theoretical foundations of medical cost-effectiveness analysis and the cost and quality of hospital care. Since 1997, he has developed the inpatient general medicine services at the University of Chicago as a Learning Health Care System to produce knowledge on how to improve the care of hospitalized patients, mobilizing the clinical care process to generate and learn from diverse data from electronic health records, claims data, patient interviews, and bio-specimens on more than 100,000 patients. He is the lead of the University of Chicago network site as part of the Chicago Area Patient Centered Outcomes Research Network. He has an M.D. and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. PAUL C. TANG (NAM) is an adjunct professor in the Clinical Excellence Research Center at Stanford University and an internist at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. He was formerly chief innovation and technology officer at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation and vice president, chief health transformation officer at IBM Watson Health. He has more than 25 years of executive leadership experience in health information technology within medical groups, health systems, and corporate settings. He has directed innovation and technology teams in provider organizations, academic institutions, corporate research organizations, and product development organizations. Most recently, he led the creation, development, deployment, and evaluation of the application of artificial intelligence to physician point-of-care solutions integrated within an electronic health record system. He also led a corporate enterprise-wide design team. He has chaired numerous federal and private sector advisory and professional association groups related 46  

  PREPUBLICATION COPY, Uncorrected Proofs    to health information technology and policy. He received an M.S. in electrical engineering from Stanford University and his M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco. 47  

Next: Appendix B: Workshop Agenda »
Building Data Capacity for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research: Interim Report Two - Data Standards, Methods, and Policy Get This Book
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The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), in partnership with other agencies and divisions of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, coordinates a portfolio of projects that build data capacity for conducting patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR). PCOR focuses on producing scientific evidence on the effectiveness of prevention and treatment options to inform the health care decisions of patients, families, and health care providers, taking into consideration the preferences, values, and questions patients face when making health care choices.

ASPE asked the National Academies to appoint a consensus study committee to identify issues critical to the continued development of the data infrastructure for PCOR. The committee's work will contribute to ASPE's development of a strategic plan that will guide their work related to PCOR data capacity over the next decade.

As part of its information gathering activities, the committee organized three workshops to collect input from stakeholders on the PCOR data infrastructure. This report, the second in a series of three interim reports, summarizes the discussion and committee conclusions from the second workshop, focused on data standards, methods, and policies that could make the PCOR data infrastructure more useful in the years ahead. Participants in the workshop included researchers and policy experts working in these areas.

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