National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates (1998)

Chapter: Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Authoring Committee

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Authoring Committee." National Research Council. 1998. The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4909.
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C—
Biographical Sketches of Authoring Committee

Irwin S. Bernstein, MA, Ph.D., Chairman

Dr. Bernstein was Sociobiologist and Research Professor at the Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center and Professor of Psychology and Zoology, University of Georgia at Athens. His research focused on primate social behavior and endocrine correlates of sex, stress, and aggression.

Christian R. Abee, MS, DVM

Dr. Abee was Chairman of the Department of Comparative Medicine at the University of South Alabama College of Medicine at Mobile, Professor in the Department of Comparative Medicine, and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Comparative Medicine, School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His research focused on the reproductive biology of nonhuman primates and animal models of human disease.

Kathryn Bayne, MS, DVM, Ph.D.

Dr. Bayne was Veterinary Behaviorist in the Veterinary Resources Program, National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD. She conducted original and independent research on the living environment of laboratory nonhuman primates and its effect on their behavior.

Thomas M. Butler, MS, DVM

Dr. Butler was Chairman of the Department of Laboratory Animal Medicine at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, TX. His re-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Authoring Committee." National Research Council. 1998. The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4909.
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search was conducted in the areas of colony management principles and primate medicine.

Judy L. Cameron, Ph.D.

Dr. Cameron was Assistant Professor in the Department of Physiology at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research involved nonhuman primate models of female hormone regulation and physiology.

Christopher L. Coe, Ph.D.

Dr. Coe was Chairman of the Department of Psychology, Harlow Primate Lab, a Staff Scientist at the Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center, and Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. His research focused on stress and immunological responses in nonhuman primates.

W. Richard Dukelow, MS, Ph.D.

Dr. Dukelow was Professor of Physiology and Animal Husbandry and Director of the Endocrine Research Unit at Michigan State University and Associate Dean of the Research College of Veterinary Medicine, East Lansing. His research included the biochemistry and physiology of reproduction, especially spermatozoa, capacitation, intrauterine devices, and embryonic mortality.

Gisela Epple, Ph.D.

Dr. Epple was a member of the Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, PA. Her research focused on the socio-sexual behavior and communication of neotropical primates.

Dorothy M. Fragaszy, MA, Ph.D.

Dr. Fragaszy was Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Georgia at Athens. Her research was conducted in the areas of manipulation, gross motor behaviors, and activity states of nonhuman primates during development.

William A. Mason, Ph.D.

Dr. Mason was Professor and Research Scientist in the Department of Psychology at the University of California at Davis. He studied primate behavior and developmental psychobiology.

Klaus A. Miczek, Ph.D.

Dr. Miczek was Professor of Psychology at Tufts University at Boston, MA. His research involved drugs, and primate behavior and aggression.

Melinda A. Novak, MA, Ph.D.

Dr. Novak was Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Authoring Committee." National Research Council. 1998. The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4909.
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University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Her research focused on primate behavior, behavioral and psychobiological development of Microtine rodents, and the environmental enrichment of captive animals.

Martin L Reite, MS, MD

Dr. Reite was Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado Health and Science Center at Denver. His research was on the developmental pathology of nonhuman primates.

Duane M. Rumbaugh, MA, Ph.D.

Dr. Rumbaugh was Regent's Professor in the Department of Psychology at Georgia State University and Director of the Language Resources Center at Decatur. His research focused on the biobehavioral studies of language and cognition of nonhuman primates.

Paul W. Schilling, DVM

Dr. Schilling was Director of Primate Breeding Operations at Charles River in Key Lois, FL. His research involved the coordination, design, and evaluation of production cages to meet animal welfare requirements for environmental enrichment of socially housed animals.

Elwyn L. Simons, MA, Ph.D., DPhil

Dr. Simons was Scientific Director at the Duke University Primate Center and the James B. Duke Professor of Anatomy and Anthropology at Durham, NC. His research focused on primatology, primate and human paleontology, primate husbandry, and the behavioral evolution of prosimians.

Charles T. Snowdon, MA, Ph.D.

Dr. Snowdon was Professor of Psychology and Zoology at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. His research examined communication and social behavior in field studies of endangered primates.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Authoring Committee." National Research Council. 1998. The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4909.
×
Page 158
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Authoring Committee." National Research Council. 1998. The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4909.
×
Page 159
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Authoring Committee." National Research Council. 1998. The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4909.
×
Page 160
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A 1985 amendment to the Animal Welfare Act requires those who keep nonhuman primates to develop and follow appropriate plans for promoting the animals' psychological well-being. The amendment, however, provides few specifics.

The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates recommends practical approaches to meeting those requirements. It focuses on what is known about the psychological needs of primates and makes suggestions for assessing and promoting their well-being.

This volume examines the elements of an effective care program--social companionship, opportunities for species-typical activity, housing and sanitation, and daily care routines--and provides a helpful checklist for designing a plan for promoting psychological well-being.

The book provides a wealth of specific and useful information about the psychological attributes and needs of the most widely used and exhibited nonhuman primates. Readable and well-organized, it will be welcomed by animal care and use committees, facilities administrators, enforcement inspectors, animal advocates, researchers, veterinarians, and caretakers.

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