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The Scientific Bases for Preservation of the Mariana Crow (1997)

Chapter: Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. The Scientific Bases for Preservation of the Mariana Crow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5372.
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Appendix C
Committee and Staff Biographical Information

W. Donald Duckworth, Chair, is president and director of the Bishop Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii. Trained in systematic entomology, his research has focused on lepidoptera in the tropics.

Steven R. Beissinger is an associate professor of conservation biology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research has focused on conservation and ecology of endangered or exploited species, demographic models of population viability and recovery, and assessing ecosystem conservation priorities, as well as other areas.

Scott R. Derrickson is curator of ornithology and deputy associate director for conservation, Smithsonian Institution's National Zoological Park. His research has focused primarily on endangered-species propagation and reintroduction.

Thomas H. Fritts is a wildlife biologist and chief of the Biological Survey Program, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, in the National Biological Service, and is curator of amphibians and reptiles in the Department of Vertebrate Zoology of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. His research has focused on Pacific Island ecology with special emphasis on the biology of the brown tree snake, problems it causes, and potential strategies for its control.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. The Scientific Bases for Preservation of the Mariana Crow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5372.
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Susan M. Haig is the senior wildlife ecologist at the Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center (National Biological Service) and an associate professor at Oregon State University. Her research focuses on genetics and demography of small populations and shorebird behavioral ecology.

Frances C. James is a professor in the Department of Biological Science at Florida State University. Her research has investigated biogeographic questions in ornithology, including habitat relationships, intraspecific geographic variation in morphology, and long-term trends in populations.

John M. Marzluff is the senior scientist at Sustainable Ecosystems Institute in Boise, Idaho. His research interests included the biology of corvids (crows, ravens, and jays), specifically how their increasing populations in North America lead to increases in nest predation rates on threatened species, and how to restore populations of endangered crows on Pacific islands.

Bruce Rideout is a senior pathologist in the Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species of the Zoological Society of San Diego. His primary research interests include avian embryonic and neonatal pathology as it relates to captive propagation for recovery programs, avian infectious diseases, and the risk of disease transmission in translocation and reintroduction programs.

Staff

Tania Williams is a program officer in the Board on Biology, Commission on Life Sciences of the National Research Council. Her interests include natural resource management, biodiversity studies, and science policy.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. The Scientific Bases for Preservation of the Mariana Crow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5372.
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Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 1997. The Scientific Bases for Preservation of the Mariana Crow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5372.
×
Page 91
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This book, while focusing on current preservation challenges posed by the Aga, or Mariana crow, also reflects the larger issues and challenges of biodiversity conservation in all oceanic island ecosystems. It evaluates causes for the continuing decline of the Aga, which exists on only the two southernmost islands in the Mariana archipelago, Guam and Rota, and reviews actions to halt or reverse the decrease.

This book reminds us of the importance and challenge of preserving the unique environmental heritage of islands of the Mariana archipelago, the need for increased knowledge to restore and maintain native species and habitats, and the compelling and lasting value of extensive public education to stimulate environmentally informed public policy development.

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