National Academies Press: OpenBook

Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists (1998)

Chapter: Appendix D Doctoral Fields Included for Data Analysis

« Previous: Appendix C Sources of Data
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Doctoral Fields Included for Data Analysis." National Research Council. 1998. Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6244.
×

Appendix D
Doctoral Fields Included for Data Analysis

The Doctorate Records File (DRF; see appendix C) categorizes all fields in which PhDs are awarded. The committee has defined the life sciences as consisting primarily of the fields in DRF categories titled ''agricultural sciences", "biological sciences", and "health sciences". Some fields in these categories have been excluded, for example, those in administrative, economic, or applied areas, such as agricultural economics. Two fields have been included as life sciences from engineering and chemistry categories and are listed below as "related sciences". Where the report refers to the "life sciences", it means all the fields listed below.

Where the committee distinguishes in the text, figures, and data tables between "biomedical" and "nonbiomedical" fields, it includes as nonbiomedical all the fields listed below in the agricultural sciences plus the 6 fields listed with an asterisk under "biological sciences". All other fields listed below are, in the committee's definition, biomedical fields.

Because the taxonomy of fields has changed over the last 30 years, explanations for changes in taxonomy are included.

Agricultural Sciences

Agronomy and Crop Science

Animal Breeding and Genetics: added in 1983

Animal Husbandry: dropped in 1983 and replaced with Animal Breeding and Genetics

Animal Nutrition

Animal Science, Other

Conservation/Renewable Natural Resources

Dairy Science

Fish and Wildlife: split into two categories in 1983

Fish Science and Management: added in 1983

Food Distribution: added in 1988; dropped again in 1995

Food Engineering: added in 1988

Food Science: split into three categories in 1988 but continues to appear on old forms

Food Science, Other: added in 1988

Forest Biology: added in 1988

Forest Engineering: added in 1988

Forest Management: added in 1988

Forestry and Related Science, Other: added in 1988

Forestry Science: split into several categories in 1988 but continues to appear on old forms

Horticulture Science

Plant Breeding and Genetics

Plant Pathology

Plant Protection and Pest Management:

dropped in 1991 but continues to appear on old forms

Plant Sciences, Other

Poultry Science

Soil Chemistry/Microbiology: added in 1988

Soil Sciences: dropped in 1988 when split but continues to appear on old forms

Soil Sciences, Other: added in 1988

Wildlife: dropped in 1988 and replaced with

Wildlife/Range Management but continues to appear on old forms.

Wildlife/Range Management: added in 1988

Wood Science and Pulp/Paper Technology: added in 1988

Agricultural Sciences, General

Agricultural Sciences, Other

Biological Sciences

Anatomy

Bacteriology: added in 1983

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Doctoral Fields Included for Data Analysis." National Research Council. 1998. Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6244.
×

Biochemistry

Biometrics and Biostatistics

Biophysics

Biotechnology Research

* Botany

Cell Biology

Developmental Biology/Embryology

* Ecology

Endocrinology

* Entomology

Genetics, Animal and Plant: divided into two categories in 1983

Genetics, Human and Animal: added in 1983

Hydrobiology: dropped in 1980

Immunology

Microbiology: added in 1983

Microbiology and Bacteriology: split into two categories in 1983

Molecular Biology

Neuroscience

Nutritional Sciences

Parasitology

Pathology, Human and Animal

Pharmacology, Human and Animal

Physiology, Human and Animal

* Plant Genetics: added in 1983

* Plant Pathology

* Plant Physiology

Toxicology

Zoology

Biological Sciences, General

Biological Sciences, Other

Health Sciences

Environmental Health

Epidemiology: added in 1983

Pharmacy

Public Health: added in 1983

Public Health/Epidemiology: split into two categories in 1983

Health Sciences, General

Health Sciences, Other

Related Sciences

Bioengineering and Biomedical

Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Doctoral Fields Included for Data Analysis." National Research Council. 1998. Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6244.
×
Page 103
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Doctoral Fields Included for Data Analysis." National Research Council. 1998. Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6244.
×
Page 104
Next: Appendix E Data Tables for Chapter 2 »
Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $57.00 Buy Ebook | $45.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

In each year between 1994 and 1996, more than 7,000 individuals received a Ph.D. in life-science, and the number of graduates is rising sharply. If present trends continue, about half of those graduates will have found permanent positions as independent researchers within ten years after graduation. These statistics--and the labor market situation they reflect--can be viewed either positively or negatively depending on whether one is a young scientist seeking a career or an established investigator whose productivity depends on the labor provided by an abundant number of graduate students.

This book examines the data concerning the production of doctorates in life-science and the changes in the kinds of positions graduates have obtained. It discusses the impact of those changes and suggests ways to deal with the challenges of supply versus demand for life-science Ph.D. graduates. Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists will serve as an information resource for young scientists deciding on career paths and as a basis for discussion by educators and policymakers as they examine the current system of education linked to research and decide if changes in that system are needed.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!