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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Uninhabited Air Vehicles: Enabling Science for Military Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9878.
×

References

Air University. 1996. Air Force 2025. Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.: Air University Press. Available on line at: http://www.au.af.mil/au/2025

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Birckelbaw, L., and M. Leahy. 1998. Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle: Advanced Technology Demonstration. Presented at the Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle Industry Day Briefing, Arlington, Virginia, February 23, 1998.


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CBO (Congressional Budget Office). 1998. Options for Enhancing the Department of Defense’s Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Programs. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Budget Office.

Chase, G., M. Yim, A. Berlin, B. Maclean, M. Olivier, and S. Jacobsen. 1997. MEMS-based control of structural dynamic instability. Pp. 105–112 in ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exhibition. Fairfield, N.J.: ASME.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Uninhabited Air Vehicles: Enabling Science for Military Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9878.
×

DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency). 1998. Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle Advanced Technology Demonstration (UCAV ATD). Phase I. Selection Process Document (“Solicitation”). MDA972-98-R-0003. Arlington, Va.: Defense Advanced Projects Agency. Available on line at: http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ac/docs/ucav-sol.html

Davis, W.R., B.B. Kosicki, D.M. Boroson, and D.F. Kostishack. 1996. Micro air vehicles for optical surveillance. MIT Lincoln Laboratory Technical Journal 9(2): 197–214.

DOD (U.S. Department of Defense). 1999. Composites Affordibility Initiative –Aircraft. Section MP.34.01 in Materials/Processes Technology Area of the 1999 Defense Technology Area Plan (DTAP). Available online at: http://mantech.iitri.org/PUBS/DTOs00/MP3401_CAI-Acft.pdf

Drela, M. 1996. Aerodynamics of heat exchangers for high-altitude aircraft. AIAA Journal of Aircraft 33(1): 176–184.

DSRC (Defense Science Research Council). 1997. Uninhabited Vehicles. Arlington, Va.: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.


Epstein, A.H., and S.D. Senturia. 1997. Macro power for micro machinery. Science 276(5316): 1211.

Ernst, L. 1996. Predator: Medium Altitude Endurance, Design and Operation of Unmanned Air Vehicles (DOUAV). SEE N97-20563 01-01. San Diego, Calif.: General Atomics Company.


Faller, W.E., S.J. Schreck, and M.W. Luttges. 1995. Neural network prediction and control of three-dimensional unsteady separated flowfields. Journal of Aircraft 32(1): 178–185.

Francis, M.S. 1998. UAVs: Challenges and Opportunities. Presentation by M.S. Francis, vice president of advanced technologies, Aurora Flight Sciences, to the Committee on Materials, Structures, and Aeronautics for Advanced UAVs, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., February 19, 1998.


Gabriel, R.F. 1992. Human Factors for Flight Deck Certification Personnel. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Transportation.

Geng, Z.J., G.G. Pan, W.S. Haynes, B.K. Wada, and J.A. Gorba. 1994. Six degrees of freedom active vibration isolation and suppression experiments. Pp. 285–294 in Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Adaptive Structures. J. Tani, ed. Basel, Switzerland: Technomic.


Heber, C. 1996. High Altitude Endurance Unmanned Vehicle Systems. Presented at the 18th Systems and Technology Symposium, ARPATech ’96.

Heneghan, S.P., S. Zabarnick, D.R. Ballal, and W.E. Harrison III. 1996. JP-8+100: The development of high-thermal-stability fuel. Transactions of ASME 118(Sept.): 170–179.

Henne, P.A., and R.D. Gregg. 1989. A New Airfoil Design Concept. AIAA 89-2201. Washington, D.C.: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Ho, C.M., and P. Huerre. 1984. Perturbed free shear layers. Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 16: 365–424.

Ho, C.M., and Y.C. Tai. 1998. Micro-electro-mechanical-systems and fluid flows. Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 30: 579–612.


Johnson, Chris, ed. 1998. Jane’s Avionics, 1997–1998 (16th ed.). Alexandria, Va.: Jane’s Information Group.

Johnstone, R., and N.J. Arntz. 1990. Condor: High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Autonomously Piloted Vehicle (APV). AIAA (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics), AHS (American Helicopter Society), and ASEE (American Society for Engineering Education) Aircraft Design, Systems and Operations Conference, Dayton, Ohio, September 17–19, 1990.


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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Uninhabited Air Vehicles: Enabling Science for Military Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9878.
×

Kroo, I., J. McMasters, and S.C. Smith. 1996. Highly Nonplanar Lifting Systems. Pp. 331–370 in Transportation Beyond 2000. NASA CP 10184. Washington, D.C.: National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


Lang, J.D. 1998. UAV System Design and Technology Considerations. Presentation by J.D. Lang, director of flight technology integration, Phantom Works, Information, Space, and Defense Systems Group, The Boeing Company, to the Committee on Materials, Structures, and Aeronautics for Advanced UAVs, Beckman Center, Irvine, California, May 19, 1998.

Lichtenwalner, P.F., J.P. Dunne, R.S. Becker, and E.W. Baumann. 1997. Active Interrogation System for Structural Health Monitoring. Pp. 186–194 in Smart Structures and Materials 1997: Industrial and Commercial Applications of Smart Structures Technologies, edited by Janet M. Sater. Vol. 3044 in SPIE Proceedings. Bellingham, Wash.: Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.


McMichael, J.M. 1998. The Micro Air Vehicle Challenge: Future Missions and Needs. Presentation by J.M. McMichael, program manager for micro air vehicles, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, to the Committee on Materials, Structures, and Aeronautics for Advanced UAVs, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., February 19, 1998.

McMichael, J.M., and M.S. Francis. 1998. Micro air vehicles: toward a new dimension in flight. Available on line at: http://www.darpa.mil/tto/mav/mav_auvsi.html

Munson, C. 1998. Personal communication from C. Munson, Boeing Corporation, to Gunter Stein, member of the Committee on Materials, Structures, and Aeronautics for Advanced UAVs, October 12, 1998.


Niewoehner, K. 1998. In Situ and Remotely Sensed Measurements by Robotic Aircraft. Presentation by K. Niewoehner, program manager, Office of Earth Science, NASA Headquarters, to the Committee on Materials, Structures, and Aeronautics for Advanced UAVs, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., February 19, 1998.

NRC (National Research Council). 1996. New Materials for Next-Generation Commercial Transports. National Materials Advisory Board, National Research Council. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Uninhabited Air Vehicles: Enabling Science for Military Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9878.
×

Schetky, L., C. Lei, B.M. Steinetz, and J.T. Sublett. 1998. Shape Memory Alloy Adaptive Control of Gas Turbine Engine Compressor Blade Clearance. P. 9, Proceedings of the AIAA/ASME/SAE/ ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit. AIAA Paper 98-3286. Washington, D.C.: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

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Zillmer, S. 1997. Integrated Multidisciplinary Optimization for Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) Design. Report WL-TR-97-3087. Dayton, Ohio: Air Force Research Laboratory.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Uninhabited Air Vehicles: Enabling Science for Military Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9878.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Uninhabited Air Vehicles: Enabling Science for Military Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9878.
×
Page 98
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Uninhabited Air Vehicles: Enabling Science for Military Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9878.
×
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Uninhabited Air Vehicles: Enabling Science for Military Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9878.
×
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U.S. Air Force (USAF) planners have envisioned that uninhabited air vehicles (UAVs), working in concert with inhabited vehicles, will become an integral part of the future force structure. Current plans are based on the premise that UAVs have the potential to augment, or even replace, inhabited aircraft in a variety of missions. However, UAV technologies must be better understood before they will be accepted as an alternative to inhabited aircraft on the battlefield. The U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) requested that the National Research Council, through the National Materials Advisory Board and the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, identify long-term research opportunities for supporting the development of technologies for UAVs. The objectives of the study were to identify technological developments that would improve the performance and reliability of “generation-after-next” UAVs at lower cost and to recommend areas of fundamental research in materials, structures, and aeronautical technologies. The study focused on innovations in technology that would “leapfrog” current technology development and would be ready for scaling-up in the post-2010 time frame (i.e., ready for use on aircraft by 2025).

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