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Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1 (2003)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee Meetings

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2003. Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10655.
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Appendix B
Committee Meetings

FIRST MEETING

May 14-16, 2002

Warrenton, Virginia

Meeting objectives: National Research Council introduction, complete administrative actions, including committee introductions and composition/balance/bias discussions for members of committee and report procedures, discuss statement of task with sponsor, discuss draft report outline, discuss project plan and report realization, discuss scenarios, review illustrative technologies, make writing assignments, and confirm objectives, location, and dates for the next two committee meetings.

Presenters

Potential Scenarios

Dennis VanDerlaske, ASAALT

Sponsor Discussion Time

John Parmentola, Director of Research and Laboratory Management

DoD’s Consequence Management Role in Homeland Security

Kathy Condon, Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Army for Military Support, Office of the Secretary of the Army

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2003. Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10655.
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Army’s Role in Homeland Defense

Gregory J. Bozek, Army War Plans, DAMO-SSW, Headquarters, Department of the Army

Indications and Warning Technologies

Robert Foresta, Branch Chief, U.S. Army CECOM, 12WD

Richard Smarjewski, U.S. Army SBCCOM

Indications and Warning Technologies

Fenner Milton, Director, U.S. Army CECOM ARDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorates

Survivability and Denial Technologies

Chuck Kimsey, Kay Blankenship, Richard Smarjewski, U.S. Army SBCCOM

Reed Mosher, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center

Attribution and Retaliation Technologies

Raymond Filler, U.S. Army CECOM C2D

Larry Bovino, U.S. Army CECOM 12WD, Radar Systems Branch

Edward Kierman, Project Leader, U.S. Army CECOM

LTC Kathy DeBolt, Commander, U.S. Army Intelligence Center

Consequence Management and Recovery Technologies

Richard Smarjewski, U.S. Army SBCCOM

Bob Welch, U.S. Army Engineer Research & Development Center

Robert Foresta, Branch Chief, U.S. Army CECOM, 12WD

National Academies’ Efforts Concerning Terrorism

Douglas C. Bauer, Director, Counterterrorism Coordination, National Research Council

Consequence Management and Recovery Technologies

LTC Harold Modrow, USAMMDA

Andrzej Miziolek, Propulsion Science Branch, U.S. Army Research Lab

Richard Smarjewski, U.S. Army SBCCOM

SECOND MEETING

June 24-26, 2002

Washington, D.C.

Meeting objectives: Complete composition/balance/bias discussions for committee members, preview additional illustrative technologies, discuss scenarios, discuss project plan and report realization, discuss concept draft, make additional writing assignments, confirm objectives, location, and dates for the next two committee meetings.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2003. Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10655.
×

Presenters

RAND Scenarios

Randy Steeb, RAND

Posse Comitatus and Other Legal Issues

Joseph R. Barnes, Brig Gen, U.S. Army (retired), Former Assistant Judge Advocate General for Civil Law and Litigation

Preliminary Army Doctrine for Homeland Defense

Larry Heystek, USA Training and Doctrine Command

Role of the Army National Guard in Homeland Defense

Colonel Jeff W. Mathis, III, National Guard Bureau

Technology Briefing—Technology in Support of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel

David Hoffman, Office of the Program Manager for the Demilitarization of Chemical Weapons

THIRD MEETING

July 24-25, 2002

Washington, D.C.

Meeting objectives: Complete composition/balance/bias discussions for committee members, preview additional illustrative technologies, discuss project plan and report realization, discuss first full message draft, make additional writing assignments, confirm objectives, location, and dates for the next committee meeting.

Presenters

Cybersecurity

Herbert S. Lin, Senior Scientist, Computer Science and Telecommunications Board

FOURTH MEETING

August 27-28, 2002

Washington, D.C.

Meeting objectives: Discuss project plan and report realization, discuss concurrence draft, and discuss review process.

Presenters

None

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2003. Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10655.
×
Page 152
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2003. Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10655.
×
Page 153
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2003. Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10655.
×
Page 154
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The confluence of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack and the U.S. Army's historic role to support civil authorities has resulted in substantial new challenges for the Army. To help meet these challenges, the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology requested the National Research Council (NRC) carry out a series of studies on how science and technology could assist the Army prepare for its role in homeland security (HLS). The NRC's Board on Army Science and Technology formed the Committee on Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security to accomplish that assignment. The Committee was asked to review relevant literature and activities, determine areas of emphasis for Army S&T in support of counter terrorism and anti-terrorism, and recommend high-payoff technologies to help the Army fulfill its mission.

The Department of Defense Counter-Terrorism Technology Task Force identified four operational areas in reviewing technical proposals for HLS operations: indications and warning; denial and survivability; recovery and consequence management; and attribution and retaliation. The study sponsor asked the Committee to use these four areas as the basis for its assessment of the science and technology (S&T) that will be important for the Army's HLS role.

Overall, the Committee found that:

  • There is potential for substantial synergy between S&T work carried out by the Army for its HLS responsibilities and the development of the next generation Army, the Objective Force.
  • The Army National Guard (ARNG) is critical to the success of the Army's HLS efforts.
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