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Biological Science and Biotechnology in Russia: Controlling Diseases and Enhancing Security (2006)

Chapter: Appendix I National Immunization Calendar of the Russian Federation

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I National Immunization Calendar of the Russian Federation." National Research Council. 2006. Biological Science and Biotechnology in Russia: Controlling Diseases and Enhancing Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11382.
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Appendix I
National Immunization Calendar of the Russian Federation

Age

Infections

Newborns (0–12 hours after birth)

Viral Hepatitis B (1st vaccination)

Newborns (3–7 days)

Tuberculosis (vaccination)

1 month

Viral Hepatitis B (2nd vaccination)

3 months

Diptheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio (1st vaccination)

4.5 months

Diptheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio (2nd vaccination)

6 months

Diptheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio (3rd vaccination)

Viral Hepatitis B (3rd vaccination)

12 months

Measles, Rubella, Mumps (vaccination)

18 months

Diptheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio (1st revaccination)

20 months

Polio (2nd revaccination

6 years

Measles, Rubella, Mumps (revaccination)

7 years

Diptheria, Tetanus (2nd revaccination)

Tuberculosis (1st revaccination)

13 years

Rubella (vaccination for girls)

Viral Hepatitis B (vaccination)

14 years

Diptheria, Tetanus (3rd revaccination)

Tuberculosis (2nd revaccination)

Adults

Diptheria, Tetanus (revaccination every 10 years after the last revaccination)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I National Immunization Calendar of the Russian Federation." National Research Council. 2006. Biological Science and Biotechnology in Russia: Controlling Diseases and Enhancing Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11382.
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Comments:

  1. National Calendar Immunizations can be provided by domestically and internationally produced vaccines that are registered and have obtained permission for use by approved order.

  2. For newborns whose mothers are HbsAg carriers or hepatitis B patients at the third trimester of pregnancy immunization against viral hepatitis B is carried out by the scheme “0-1-2-12 months.”

  3. Vaccination against viral hepatitis B at the age of 13 is for those who were not immunized earlier.

  4. Vaccination against rubella is carried out at the age of 13 for girls who were not immunized earlier or received only one vaccination.

  5. Revaccination against tuberculosis is for children who are not infected with tuberculosis.

  6. Revaccination against tuberculosis at the age of 14 is carried out for children who are not infected with tuberculosis and didn’t receive immunization at the age of 7.

  7. Vaccines used in accordance with the National Immunization Calendar can be injected simultaneously with various syringes in various places on the body.

Two Key Challenges in National Calendar Implementation:

  1. Lack of hepatitis B vaccines in practice. At the first stage of the immunization program in the Russian Federation alone, demand could reach $50 million and Russian Federation Health authorities (both federal and local) are capable of providing not more than $20 million. This is the reason for restricting vaccinations against hepatitis B to risk groups of the population (such as for newborns whose mothers are HbsAg carriers, infants from orphanages, children with family members who are HbsAg carriers, adolescents between the ages of 11 and 17). All others must be vaccinated at their own expense, or at the expense of local budgets, insurance companies, enterprises, etc.

  2. The absence of locally-produced vaccines against rubella, as well as combined MMR preparations. Newer vaccines, such as those for Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Herpes zoster have existed for years, but are not incorporated into RF immunization programs. Thus children born every year will not be adequately protected against vaccine-preventable diseases.

SOURCE: Ministry of Health and Social Development, provided fall 2004.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix I National Immunization Calendar of the Russian Federation." National Research Council. 2006. Biological Science and Biotechnology in Russia: Controlling Diseases and Enhancing Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11382.
×
Page 113
Suggested Citation:"Appendix I National Immunization Calendar of the Russian Federation." National Research Council. 2006. Biological Science and Biotechnology in Russia: Controlling Diseases and Enhancing Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11382.
×
Page 114
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In July 2005, the National Academies released the report Biological Science and Biotechnology in Russia: Controlling Diseases and Enhancing Security. The report offered a number of recommendations that could help restore Russia’s ability to join with the United States and the broader international community in leading an expanded global effort to control infectious diseases. A proposed bilateral intergovernmental commission could play a pivotal role toward that end as cooperation moves from assistance to partnership. The report proposed the establishment of two model State Sanitary Epidemiological Surveillance Centers in Russia, more focused support of competitively selected Russian research groups as centers of excellence, the promotion of investments in biotechnology niches that are well suited for Russian companies, and expanded opportunities for young scientists to achieve scientific leadership positions in Russia. Also, the report highlighted the importance of U.S. programs that support the integration of former Soviet defense scientists with civilian researchers who had not been involved in military-related activities.

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