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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
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A
Study Process

The committee reviewed and considered a broad array of information in its work on issues involving sleep disorder research. Information sources included the primary scientific literature, books and scientific reviews, and presentations from researchers, as well as representatives from federal agencies and academic, professional, and nonprofit organizations.

LITERATURE REVIEW

Extensive bibliographic searches were conducted, resulting in a reference database of more than 2,000 entries. Searches of the primary biomedical bibliographic databases, MEDLINE and EMBASE,1 were supplemented with searches of Dissertation Abstracts Online, LexisNexis, and THOMAS (a federal legislative database). The Dissertation Abstracts database provided information on the current level of Ph.D. thesis production in the field of sleep disorders.2

1

Excerpta Medica.

2

Institute of Medicine staff searched the Dissertation Abstracts database using the search terms sleep, sleep disorders, sleep apnea, dream, insomnia, hibernation, periodic limb movement, restless legs syndrome, circadian rhythm, narcolepsy, and sudden infant death syndrome. The question mark is used to search for terms with multiple endings. For example, the search term sleep disord? resulted in hits that included sleep disorder and sleep disorders.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×

GRANT ANALYSIS

To identify information on funding mechanisms and trends from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Institute of Medicine (IOM) staff queried the Computer Retrieval of Information on Scientific Projects (CRISP) database. This database collects information on the number of federally funded biomedical research projects. Data from the CRISP database were used to assess the number of fellowships (F grants), career grants (K grants), research grants (e.g., R01 grants), project grants (P grants), training (T grants), cooperative agreements (U grants), and Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer awards funded by the NIH. To discern the number of NIH grants directed toward sleep-related research, IOM staff used appropriate keywords (which appeared in a 9,000-word thesaurus) for various sleep disorders, including: insomnia, periodic limb movement disorder, restless legs syndrome, circadian rhythm, sudden infant death syndrome, sleep disorder, narcolepsy, sleep apnea, sleep, hibernation, and dream. To limit the number of grants that were not relevant to somnology or sleep disorders the committee included only grants in which the keywords appeared in the thesaurus terms and not the abstract. Additional information on general funding trends at NIH was located in published documents and was provided by NIH staff.

PUBLIC WORKSHOPS

The committee held five meetings over the course of the study to address the study charge, review the data collected, and develop the report. Three of those meetings included public workshops: April 11–12, 2005; June 29–30, 2005; and September 15–16, 2005.

The first workshop (Box A-1) included three sessions that covered the public health significance of sleep deprivation and disorders, sleep deprivation and society, sleep apnea, and the impact of sleep deprivation and disorders on specific populations.

The committee held the second public workshop (Box A-2) in Washington, D.C. In that workshop the committee heard from 17 speakers who had expertise in surveillance and monitoring programs and technologies, model interdisciplinary programs, and training and education in sleep research.

The third meeting took place at the Jonsson Conference Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. The public workshop (Box A-3) consisted of two sessions that included a review of results from a survey and commissioned paper on sleep and a discussion with Dr. Charles Czeisler, director of Harvard Medical School’s Division of Sleep Medicine and president-elect of the Sleep Research Society.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×

BOX A-1

Institute of Medicine Committee on Sleep Medicine and Research

April 11–12, 2005

Monday April 11, 2005

Session I: Sponsors’ Perspective, Panel Discussion with Committee

Tuesday, April 12, 2005

Session I: Public Health Significance of Sleep Deprivation and Disorders

8:25

Welcome and Introductions

 

Harvey Colten, Chair

8:30

Impact of Insomnia and Periodic Leg Movements

 

Thomas Roth, Henry Ford Health System of Detroit

9:00

Overview of the Public Health Significance of Sleep Deprivation and Disorders

 

Terry Young, University of Wisconsin

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×

9:30

Sleep Duration: Neurobehavioral, Physiological, and Epidemiological Issues

 

David Dinges, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Session II: Sleep Deprivation and Society

10:15

Accidents Caused by Sleep Deprivation and Disorders

 

Allan Pack, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center

10:45

Metabolic Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

 

Daniel Gottlieb, Boston University School of Medicine

Session III: Sleep Apnea

11:15

Effect of Apnea on Cardiovascular Disease and Metabolic Functions

 

Susan Redline, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

11:45

Discussion of Morning Session

Session IV: Impact of Sleep Deprivation and Disorders on Specific Populations

1:00

Snoring in Children: Sound the Alarm!

 

David Gozal, University of Louisville

1:30

Sleep Loss and Women’s Health

 

Kathy Lee, University of California, San Francisco

2:00

Sleep Disturbance in Geriatrics

 

Donald Bliwise, Emory University

2:30

Discussion of Afternoon Session

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×

BOX A-2

Institute of Medicine Committee on Sleep Medicine and Research

June 29–30, 2005

June 29, 2005

11:15

Lee Goldman

 

University of California, San Francisco, Department of Medicine

Surveillance Programs and Technologies

1:00

Welcome and Introductions

 

Harvey Colten, Chair

 

Paul Eggers, NIDDK, Co-Project Officer, United States Renal Data System

 

Ed Sondik, Director, National Center for Health Statistics

2:15

Open Discussion

2:45

Roger Rosa

 

Senior Scientist, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

3:15

Eugene J. Lengerich

 

Co-Chair, Pennsylvania Cancer Control Consortium

3:45

Andrea Califano

 

Co-Director, Center for Computational Biochemistry and Biosystems, Bioworks and the NCI caCORE platform

4:15

Open Discussion

June 30, 2005

Organizational Impediments

8:30

David Lewis

 

President and Chief Executive Officer, SleepMed, Inc.

9:00

Michael Martin

 

Director of the Division of Physiology and Pathology in the Center for Scientific Review, NIH

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×

9:30

William Dement

 

Director, Sleep Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine

10:15

David White

 

Director, Sleep Disorders Program, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

10:45

General Discussion

Model Interdisciplinary Programs

12:30

Kathleen C. Buckwalter

 

Codirector University of Iowa Center on Aging

1:00

Story Landis

 

Director, NINDS, Co-chair NIH Pain Consortium

1:30

Hal Moses

 

Founding Director of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

2:00

David J. Kupfer

 

Chair, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

2:30

Steven Wolinsky

 

Division Chief of Infectious Diseases

 

Northwestern University

3:00

General Discussion

Training and Education

3:30

Judith Owens

 

Brown University Medical School, AASM MED Sleep Program

4:00

Daniel Buysse

 

Department of Psychiatry, UPMC Sleep Medicine Center and Sleep Medicine Fellowship Training Program

4:30

Roger Bulger

 

President, Association of Academic Health Centers

5:00

General Discussion

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×

BOX A-3

Institute of Medicine Committee on Sleep Medicine and Research

September 15–16, 2005

September 15, 2005

12:45

Results from AASM Academic Health Centers Survey

 

Michael Sateia, Section of Sleep Medicine Chief, Dartmouth University

 

Past President, American Academy of Sleep Medicine

1:30

Preliminary Findings of Commissioned Paper

 

John Fontanesi, Center for Management Science in Public Health, University of California, San Diego

September 16, 2005

10:15

Discussion with Charles Czeisler

 

Director, Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School President-Elect, Sleep Research Society

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×
Page 325
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×
Page 326
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×
Page 327
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×
Page 328
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×
Page 329
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×
Page 330
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Study Process ." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11617.
×
Page 331
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Clinical practice related to sleep problems and sleep disorders has been expanding rapidly in the last few years, but scientific research is not keeping pace. Sleep apnea, insomnia, and restless legs syndrome are three examples of very common disorders for which we have little biological information. This new book cuts across a variety of medical disciplines such as neurology, pulmonology, pediatrics, internal medicine, psychiatry, psychology, otolaryngology, and nursing, as well as other medical practices with an interest in the management of sleep pathology. This area of research is not limited to very young and old patients—sleep disorders reach across all ages and ethnicities. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation presents a structured analysis that explores the following:

  • Improving awareness among the general public and health care professionals.
  • Increasing investment in interdisciplinary somnology and sleep medicine research training and mentoring activities.
  • Validating and developing new and existing technologies for diagnosis and treatment. This book will be of interest to those looking to learn more about the enormous public health burden of sleep disorders and sleep deprivation and the strikingly limited capacity of the health care enterprise to identify and treat the majority of individuals suffering from sleep problems.
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