National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 4 Resource Needs and Opportunities
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges–Finding Solutions: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11996.
×

Appendix A
Agenda

Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges—Finding Solutions

The National Academies

500 Fifth Street, NW – Room 100

Washington, DC

December 12–13, 2006


Tuesday, December 12, 2006

8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m.

Welcome and Opening Remarks

P. Fred Sparling, M.D., Vice Chair

Forum on Microbial Threats

8:45–9:15 a.m.

Keynote Address: “Syndromic Surveillance: Moving from Theory to Practice”

Patrick W. Kelley, M.D., Dr.P.H.

The National Academies

9:15–9:45 a.m.

Discussion

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges–Finding Solutions: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11996.
×

Session I:
Surveillance for Emerging, Reemerging, and Novel Infectious Diseases

Moderator: Col. Ralph Erickson, M.D., Department of Defense Global Emerging Infectious Surveillance and Response System

9:45–10:15 a.m.

Public Health Infectious Disease Surveillance

Michael Stoto, Ph.D.

Georgetown University

10:15–10:45 a.m.

Infectious Disease Surveillance: The “Local” Perspective

Marci Layton, M.D.

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

10:45–11:00 a.m.

Break

11:00–11:30 a.m.

Animal Disease Surveillance

William Karesh, D.V.M.

Wildlife Conservation Society

11:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Plant Disease Surveillance and Detection

Jacque Fletcher, Ph.D.

Oklahoma State University

Jim Stack, Ph.D.

Kansas State University

12:00–12:30 p.m.

Open Discussion of Session I

12:30–1:15 p.m.

Lunch

Session II:
Infectious Disease Detection and Diagnostics

Moderator: David Relman, M.D., Stanford University

1:15–1:45 p.m.

Mark D. Perkins, M.D.

Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND)

1:45–2:15 p.m.

Stephen Johnston, Ph.D.

Arizona State University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges–Finding Solutions: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11996.
×

2:15–2:45 p.m.

Animal Disease Detection: Diagnostic Laboratory Perspective

Alex Ardans, D.V.M.

California Animal Health & Food Safety Laboratory System

2:45–3:00 p.m.

Break

3:00–3:30 p.m.

Rapid Infectious Disease Diagnostic Assays

Mark Wolcott, Ph.D.

U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

3:30–4:00 p.m.

Discussion of the GreeneChip: A Panmicrobial Oligonucleotide Array for the Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases

W. Ian Lipkin, M.D.

Columbia University

4:00–5:00 p.m.

Open Discussion of Session II

5:00–5:45 p.m.

Open Discussion of Day 1

6:00–7:00 p.m.

Open Reception

Wednesday, December 13, 2006

8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m.

Opening Remarks/Summary of Day 1

Peggy Hamburg, Vice Chair

Forum on Microbial Threats

Session III:
Current and Future Methods for Infectious Disease Surveillance, Reporting, and Communication

Moderator: Stephen S. Morse, Ph.D., Columbia University

8:40–9:10 a.m.

Discussion of ProMED-mail

Stephen S. Morse, Ph.D.

Columbia University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges–Finding Solutions: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11996.
×

9:10–9:40 a.m.

Discussion of the Global Public Health Intelligence Network

Abla Mawudeku, M.P.H.

Global Public Health Intelligence Network

9:40–10:10 a.m.

Implications of “Real Time” and “Batch Reporting” for Surveillance

Joseph Lombardo, Ph.D.

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

10:10–10:30 a.m.

Break

10:30–11:00 a.m.

Using Cell Phone Technology for Infectious Disease SurveillanceSurveillance

Pamela Johnson, Ph.D.

Voxiva

David Blazes, M.D., M.P.H.

Naval Medical Research Unit, Peru

11:00–11:30 a.m.

HealthMap: A Global Disease Alert Mapping System

John Brownstein, Ph.D.

Harvard Medical School

11:30 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Open Discussion of Session III

12:15–1:00 p.m.

Lunch

Session IV:
Infectious Disease Detection, Surveillance, and Reporting— Resource Needs and Opportunities

Moderator: Fred Sparling, M.D., University of North Carolina

1:00–1:30 p.m.

Coordination of Disease Surveillance, Detection, Diagnostics, and Reporting

Will Hueston, D.V.M., Ph.D.

University of Minnesota

1:30–3:30 p.m.

Discussion Panel

 

  • Marci Layton, M.D.

 

New York City Department of Health and Mental

Hygiene

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges–Finding Solutions: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11996.
×

 

  • Fernando Guerra, M.D., M.P.H.

 

San Antonio Department of Health

 

  • Frances P. Downes, Dr.P.H.

 

Michigan Public Health Laboratory

 

  • W. Ian Lipkin, M.D.

 

Columbia University

 

  • James LeDuc, Ph.D.

 

University of Texas Medical Branch

3:30–4:15 p.m.

Open Discussion of Session IV

4:15–4:30 p.m.

Closing Remarks/Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges–Finding Solutions: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11996.
×
Page 233
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges–Finding Solutions: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11996.
×
Page 234
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges–Finding Solutions: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11996.
×
Page 235
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges–Finding Solutions: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11996.
×
Page 236
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges–Finding Solutions: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11996.
×
Page 237
Next: Appendix B Acronyms »
Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges–Finding Solutions: Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $75.00 Buy Ebook | $59.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Early detection is essential to the control of emerging, reemerging, and novel infectious diseases, whether naturally occurring or intentionally introduced. Containing the spread of such diseases in a profoundly interconnected world requires active vigilance for signs of an outbreak, rapid recognition of its presence, and diagnosis of its microbial cause, in addition to strategies and resources for an appropriate and efficient response. Although these actions are often viewed in terms of human public health, they also challenge the plant and animal health communities.

Surveillance, defined as "the continual scrutiny of all aspects of occurrence and spread of a disease that are pertinent to effective control", involves the "systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health data." Disease detection and diagnosis is the act of discovering a novel, emerging, or reemerging disease or disease event and identifying its cause. Diagnosis is "the cornerstone of effective disease control and prevention efforts, including surveillance."

Disease surveillance and detection relies heavily on the astute individual: the clinician, veterinarian, plant pathologist, farmer, livestock manager, or agricultural extension agent who notices something unusual, atypical, or suspicious and brings this discovery in a timely way to the attention of an appropriate representative of human public health, veterinary medicine, or agriculture. Most developed countries have the ability to detect and diagnose human, animal, and plant diseases.

Global Infectious Disease Surveillance and Detection: Assessing the Challenges -- Finding Solutions, Workshop Summary is part of a 10 book series and summarizes the recommendations and presentations of the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!