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National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (2011)

Chapter: Appendix A: Guest Speakers at Committee Meetings

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Guest Speakers at Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
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Appendix A

Guest Speakers at Committee Meetings

Washington, D.C. – February 2010

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Maj. General William T. Grisoli

Deputy Commanding General for Civil and Emergency Operations

Steven L. Stockton

Director, Civil Works

Sacramento – July 2010

Federal Agencies

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Paige Caldwell

Miki Fujitsobo

Alicia Kirchner

Brooke Schlenker

Sara Schultz

Dan Tibbits

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

Ron Milligan

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Michael Hoover

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Guest Speakers at Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
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State Agencies

State of California Department of Water Resources

Rod Mayer

Mike Mierzwa

Levee and Flood Control Associations

Lewis Bair, Reclamation District 108, Grimes, CA

Mike Hardesty, Central Valley Flood Control Association, Dixon, CA

Other Invited Experts

David Ford, David Ford Consulting Engineers, Inc., Sacramento

Ronald Stork, Friends of the River, Sacramento

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Guest Speakers at Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
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Page 27
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Guest Speakers at Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
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Page 28
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The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) is responsible for construction, operations, and maintenance of much of the nation's water resources infrastructure. This infrastructure includes flood control levees, multi-purpose dams, locks, navigation channels, port and harbor facilities, and beach protection infrastructure. The Corps of Engineers also regulates the dredging and filling of wetlands subject to federal jurisdictions. Along with its programs for flood damage reduction and support of commercial navigation, ecosystem restoration was added as a primary Corps mission area in 1996.

The National Research Council (NRC) Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Water Resources Science, Engineering, and Planning was convened by the NRC at the request of the Corps of Engineers to provide independent advice to the Corps on an array of strategic and planning issues. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers surveys the key water resources challenges facing the Corps, the limits of what might be expected today from the Corps, and future prospects for the agency. This report presents several findings, but no recommendations, to the Corps of Engineers based on initial investigations and discussions with Corps leadership.

National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers can serve as a foundational resource for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Congress, federal agencies, and Corps project co-sponsors, among others.

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