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National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (2011)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
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Appendix C

Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning

David A. Dzombak (NAE), Chair, is the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. university professor of environmental engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, and faculty director of the Carnegie Mellon Steinbrenner Institute for Environmental Education and Research. He conducts research in water quality engineering and science, on topics pertaining to environmental restoration and the water-energy nexus. Dr. Dzombak is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a registered Professional Engineer in Pennsylvania, a Diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, and a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He served as the chairman of the NRC Committee on the Mississippi River and the Clean Water Act. Dr. Dzombak holds a B.A. degree in mathematics from Saint Vincent College, B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and a Ph.D. degree in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Patrick A. Atkins is with Atkins 360, LLC, a consulting firm in Pittsburgh that specializes in teaching and consulting on energy, lifecycle, and sustainability issues. Until his retirement in April 2007, Dr. Atkins was Director of Energy Innovation at Alcoa, Inc., responsible for implementing solutions for waste heat recovery in refining, smelting, and casting, assessment of alternate energy sources (e.g., renewable) and their applicability across Alcoa worldwide. Dr. Atkins is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the National Society of Professional Engineers, and the Engineering Society of Western Pennsylvania. He is a past member

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
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of the Science Advisory Board for the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, and an Operating Advisor at Pegasus Capital Advisors, LLC, a New York-based Private Equity firm. Dr. Atkins is a registered professional engineer in Pennsylvania and Texas. Dr. Atkins received a B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Kentucky and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental engineering from Stanford University.

Gregory B. Baecher (NAE) is the G.L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering at the University of Maryland in College Park. Dr. Baecher’s principal area of work addresses the reliability of civil infrastructure and project risk management, especially in geotechnical and water resources engineering. From 1998-2005 he served as a member of the NRC Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. Baecher is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on several NRC committees. He chaired the NRC Committee on Risk-Based Analyses for Flood Damage Reduction and the Panel on (Corps of Engineers) Methods and Techniques of Project Analysis. He holds a B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and Sc.M. and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Linda K. Blum is a research associate professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. Her current research projects include study of how living organisms modify the geomorphology of salt marshes in response to external drivers such as sea level, precipitation, tides, and/or anthropogenic nitrogen loading; mechanisms controlling bacterial community abundance, productivity, and structure in tidal marsh creeks and soils; and rhizosphere effects on organic matter decay in anaerobic sediments. Dr. Blum served as chair of the NRC Panel to Review the Critical Ecosystem Initiative and was a member of the NRC Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, the Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress, and the Committee on Challenges and Opportunities in Earth Surface Processes. She earned her B.S. and M.S. degrees in forestry from Michigan Technological University and her Ph.D. degree in soil science and microbial ecology from Cornell University.

Robert A. Dalrymple (NAE) is the Willard and Lillian Hackerman Professor of Civil Engineering at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. His major research interests and projects are in the areas of coastal engineering, wave mechanics, fluid mechanics, littoral processes, and tidal inlets. His current interests are water wave modeling, tsunamis and their impacts on shorelines, and the interaction of water waves with

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×

the sea bed, specifically mud bottoms. He chaired the NRC Committee on the Review of the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration (LACPR) Program, and currently is chairing the NRC Committee on Sea Level Rise in California, Oregon, and Washington. Dr. Dalrymple received his A.B. degree in engineering sciences from Dartmouth University, his M.S. degree in ocean engineering from the University of Hawaii, and his Ph.D. degree in civil and coastal engineering from the University of Florida.

Misganaw Demissie is director of the Illinois State Water Survey at the University of Illinois. His research at the Water Survey has focused on watershed science with emphasis on erosion and sedimentation and watershed hydrology. He has published more than one hundred journal articles, reports, and conference proceedings. Dr. Demissie is recipient of several awards including The Frank Bellrose Illinois River Conservation Award from the Nature Conservancy for outstanding service and contribution towards the restoration of the Illinois River. Dr. Demissie is a registered Professional Engineer in Illinois. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers, a Diplomate of the American Academy of Water Resources Engineers, and a member of the International Water Resources Association and the International Association of Hydrological Sciences. Dr. Demissie received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Iowa, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Illinois.

Terrance (Terry) Fulp is the Deputy Regional Director for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s Lower Colorado River region headquartered in Boulder City, Nevada. Dr. Fulp is involved in numerous Colorado River issues, working with federal and state agencies and other stakeholder groups on system operations decisions. Prior to his appointment as Deputy Regional Director, he served as Area Manager of the Boulder Canyon Operations Office, where he managed a basin-wide effort to develop additional operational guidelines for Lake Powell and Lake Mead to minimize the effects of long-term drought. He was the principal investigator for the Department of the Interior’s Watershed and River Systems Management Program. The program developed decision support tools for watershed management and resulted in development of RiverWareTM, a river operations modeling framework now is used by several water management agencies—including Reclamation and the Corps of Engineers. Dr. Fulp received his B.S. degree in earth sciences from the University of Tulsa, his M.S. degree in geophysics from Stanford University, and his Ph.D. in Mathematical and Computer Sciences from the Colorado School of Mines.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×

Larry Larson is the Executive Director of the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM), headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin. A founding member of ASFPM in the 1970s, Larson oversees the Association’s activities and communications and coordinates national flood and water resources policy development and advancement with state, local, and federal agencies; the Administration and Congress; and other policy groups and organizations. He also spent 30 years with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources managing flood loss reduction, dam safety, and wetlands programs, and 5 years with the California Department of Water Resources on design and construction of large dams, aqueducts, and water projects. An expert in developing the nation’s policy on wise and sustainable use of floodplains, Larry has authored numerous position papers and articles, provides expert testimony to Congress, and frequently speaks to policy makers and flood hazard managers nationally and abroad. He is a Certified Floodplain Manager and a registered professional engineer in California and Wisconsin. Larry holds a B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Wisconsin.

Diane M. McKnight is a professor in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, and a fellow of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, at the University of Colorado. Prior to her current post she was a research scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. Her areas of research are biogeochemical processes, aquatic ecology, and reactive solute transport in streams and lakes in the Rocky Mountains and in polar desert areas of Antarctica. She has published numerous journal articles and book chapters, and edited several books. In 1995, along with three other limnologists, she co-authored The Freshwater Imperative: A Research Agenda. Dr. McKnight is past president of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography and of the biogeosciences section of the American Geophysical Union, and was the first editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. Since serving on the NRC Committee on Climate Change and Water Resources Management in 1990-1992, she has served on several other NRC committees, as well as the Polar Research Board and the Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. McKnight received her B.S. degree in mechanical engineering, M.S. degree in civil engineering, and Ph.D. degree in environmental engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

J. Walter Milon is the Chair and Provost’s Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Economics, College of Business Administration, at the University of Central Florida. His major research interests are water resource economics, ecosystem valuation, and environmental policy. In addition to his academic research and publications, Dr. Milon has con-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×

ducted research and consulting for a number of federal agencies including the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Dr. Milon received his B.S. degree in finance, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in economics, from Florida State University.

A. Dan Tarlock is a professor at the Chicago-Kent College of Law, where he teaches courses in land use, property, energy and natural resource law, environmental policy, and international environmental law. He is an internationally recognized expert in environmental law and the law of land and water use. He has published a treatise, Law of Water Rights and Resources, and is a co-author of four casebooks. Professor Tarlock is a frequent consultant to local, state, federal, and international agencies, private groups, and law firms, and is an elected member of the American Law Institute. From 1989 to 1992, he served as chairman of the NRC Committee on Western Water Management. In 1996-1997 he was the principal report writer for the Western Water Policy Review Advisory Committee. He is a member of the California bar. Professor Tarlock is currently one of three United States special legal advisers to the NAFTA Commission on Environmental Cooperation. He also is a National Associate of The National Academies. Professor Tarlock received his B.A. and J.D. degrees from Stanford University.

Peter R. Wilcock is a professor of geography and environmental engineering at the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. His areas of research focus on river sedimentation processes and their role in stream restoration and river management. His research includes both laboratory and field experiments in sediment transport, open-channel flow, fluvial and hillslope geomorphology. Dr. Wilcock served as chair of the NRC Panel on River Basin Systems and Coastal Planning and was a member of the NRC Committee on Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research. He received his B.S. degree in physical geography from the University of Illinois, his M.S. degree in geomorphology from McGill University, and his Sc.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×
Page 38
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Science, Engineering, and Planning." National Research Council. 2011. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13136.
×
Page 40
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The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) is responsible for construction, operations, and maintenance of much of the nation's water resources infrastructure. This infrastructure includes flood control levees, multi-purpose dams, locks, navigation channels, port and harbor facilities, and beach protection infrastructure. The Corps of Engineers also regulates the dredging and filling of wetlands subject to federal jurisdictions. Along with its programs for flood damage reduction and support of commercial navigation, ecosystem restoration was added as a primary Corps mission area in 1996.

The National Research Council (NRC) Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Water Resources Science, Engineering, and Planning was convened by the NRC at the request of the Corps of Engineers to provide independent advice to the Corps on an array of strategic and planning issues. National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers surveys the key water resources challenges facing the Corps, the limits of what might be expected today from the Corps, and future prospects for the agency. This report presents several findings, but no recommendations, to the Corps of Engineers based on initial investigations and discussions with Corps leadership.

National Water Resources Challenges Facing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers can serve as a foundational resource for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Congress, federal agencies, and Corps project co-sponsors, among others.

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