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Himalayan Glaciers: Climate Change, Water Resources, and Water Security (2012)

Chapter: Appendix F: Institutional Oversight

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Institutional Oversight." National Research Council. 2012. Himalayan Glaciers: Climate Change, Water Resources, and Water Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13449.
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Appendix F

Institutional Oversight

Institutional oversight for this project was provided by the following.

BOARD ON ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES AND CLIMATE

ANTONIO J. BUSALACCHI, JR. (Chair), University of Maryland, College Park

GERALD A. MEEHL (Vice Chair), National Center for Atmospheric Research

LANCE F. BOSART, State University of New York, Albany

RICHARD CARBONE, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

SHUYI S. CHEN, University of Miami, Florida

KIRSTIN DOW, University of South Carolina, Columbia

GREG S. FORBES, The Weather Channel, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia

LISA GODDARD, Columbia University, Palisades, New York

ISAAC HELD, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Princeton, New Jersey

ANTHONY JANETOS, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, College Park, Maryland

HAROON S. KHESHGI, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, New Jersey

MICHAEL D. KING, University of Colorado, Boulder

JOHN E. KUTZBACH, University of Wisconsin-Madison

ARTHUR LEE, Chevron Corporation, San Ramon, California

ROBERT J. LEMPERT, The RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California

ROGER B. LUKAS, University of Hawaii, Honolulu

SUMANT NIGAM, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, College Park, Maryland RAYMOND T PIERREHUMBERT, University of Chicago, Illinois

KIMBERLYPRATHER, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California

RICH RICHELS, Electric Power Research Institute, Inc., Washington, DC

DAVID A. ROBINSON, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway

KIRK R. SMITH, University of California, Berkeley

JOHNT SNOW, University of Oklahoma, Norman

CLAUDIA TEBALDI, Climate Central, Princeton, New Jersey

XUBIN ZENG, University of Arizona, Tucson

NRC Staff

CHRIS ELFRING, Director

LAURIE GELLER, Senior Program Officer

EDWARD DUNLEA, Senior Program Officer

MAGGIE WALSER, Program Officer

KATIE THOMAS, Associate Program Officer

DANIEL MUTH, Postdoctoral Fellow

LAUREN BROWN, Research Associate

AMANDA PURCELL, Research Associate

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Institutional Oversight." National Research Council. 2012. Himalayan Glaciers: Climate Change, Water Resources, and Water Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13449.
×

RITA GASKINS, Administrative Coordinator

ROB GREENWAY, Program Associate

SHELLY FREELAND, Senior Program Assistant

RICARDO PAYNE, Senior Program Assistant

ELIZABETH FINKELMAN, Program Assistant

GRAIG MANSFIELD, Financial Associate

WATER SCIENCE AND
TECHNOLOGY BOARD

DONALD I. SIEGEL (Chair), Syracuse University, New York

LISA ALVAREZ-COHEN, University of California, Berkeley

EDWARD J. BOUWER, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland

YU-PING CHIN, The Ohio State University, Columbus

OTTO C. DOERING, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Illinois

M. SIOBHAN FENNESSY, Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio

BEN GRUMBLES, Clean Water America Alliance, Washington, D.C.

GEORGE R. HALLBERG, The Cadmus Group, Inc., Watertown, Massachusetts

KENNETH R. HERD, Southwest Florida Water Management District, Brooksville

GEORGE M. HORNBERGER, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

KIMBERLYL.JONES, Howard University, Washington, D.C.

LARRY LARSON, Association of State Floodplain Managers, Madison, Wisconsin

DAVID H. MOREAU, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

DENNIS D. MURPHY, University of Nevada, Reno

MARYLYNN V. YATES, University of California, Riverside

NRC Staff

STEPHEN PARKER, Director

JEFFREYJACOBS, Scholar

LAURA J. EHLERS, Senior Program Officer

STEPHANIE JOHNSON, Senior Program Officer

LAURA J. HELSABECK, Senior Program Officer

JEANNE AQUILINO, Financial and Administrative Associate

ANITA HALL, Senior Program Associate

MICHAEL STOEVER, Research Associate

SARAH BRENNAN, Program Assistant

COMMITTEE ON POPULATION

LINDA J. WAITE (Chair), Department of Sociology, University of Chicago

CHRISTINE BACHRACH, Social Science Research Institute, Duke University, and School of Behavioral and Social Sciences, University of Maryland

EILEEN M. CRIMMINS, Department of Sociology, University of Southern California

PETER J. DONALDSON, Population Council, New York

BARBARA ENTWISLE, Department of Sociology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

JOSHUA R. GOLDSTEIN, Max Planck-Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany

CHARLES HIRSCHMAN, Department of Sociology, University of Washington

BARTHELEMYKUATE-DEFO, Department of Demography, University of Montreal

WOLFGANG LUTZ, World Population Program, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria

DUNCAN THOMAS, Economics Department, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University

BARBARA B. TORREY, Independent Consultant, Washington, DC

MAXINE WEINSTEIN, Center for Population and Health, Georgetown University

NRC Staff

BARNEY COHEN, Director

LAUDAN ARON, Senior Program Officer

KEVIN KINSELLA, Senior Program Officer

MALAY MAJMUNDAR, Program Officer

KEIKO ONO, Senior Program Associate

BARBARA BOYD, Administrative Associate

DANIELLE JOHNSON, Senior Program Assistant

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Institutional Oversight." National Research Council. 2012. Himalayan Glaciers: Climate Change, Water Resources, and Water Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13449.
×
Page 139
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Institutional Oversight." National Research Council. 2012. Himalayan Glaciers: Climate Change, Water Resources, and Water Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13449.
×
Page 140
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Scientific evidence shows that most glaciers in South Asia's Hindu Kush Himalayan region are retreating, but the consequences for the region's water supply are unclear, this report finds. The Hindu Kush Himalayan region is the location of several of Asia's great river systems, which provide water for drinking, irrigation, and other uses for about 1.5 billion people. Recent studies show that at lower elevations, glacial retreat is unlikely to cause significant changes in water availability over the next several decades, but other factors, including groundwater depletion and increasing human water use, could have a greater impact. Higher elevation areas could experience altered water flow in some river basins if current rates of glacial retreat continue, but shifts in the location, intensity, and variability of rain and snow due to climate change will likely have a greater impact on regional water supplies.

Himalayan Glaciers: Climate Change, Water Resources, and Water Security makes recommendations and sets guidelines for the future of climate change and water security in the Himalayan Region. This report emphasizes that social changes, such as changing patterns of water use and water management decisions, are likely to have at least as much of an impact on water demand as environmental factors do on water supply. Water scarcity will likely affect the rural and urban poor most severely, as these groups have the least capacity to move to new locations as needed. It is predicted that the region will become increasingly urbanized as cities expand to absorb migrants in search of economic opportunities. As living standards and populations rise, water use will likely increase-for example, as more people have diets rich in meat, more water will be needed for agricultural use. The effects of future climate change could further exacerbate water stress.

Himalayan Glaciers: Climate Change, Water Resources, and Water Security explains that changes in the availability of water resources could play an increasing role in political tensions, especially if existing water management institutions do not better account for the social, economic, and ecological complexities of the region. To effectively respond to the effects of climate change, water management systems will need to take into account the social, economic, and ecological complexities of the region. This means it will be important to expand research and monitoring programs to gather more detailed, consistent, and accurate data on demographics, water supply, demand, and scarcity.

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