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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Time Series Plots." National Research Council. 2014. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Fish Stock Rebuilding Plans in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18488.
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Appendix C

Time Series Plots

Time series of total catch, stock size, fishing mortality, recruitment, and recruits per spawning biomass for all stocks for which estimates were made available for this report, were derived from data provided by the National Maritime Fisheries Service and several of the assessment authors. Results correspond to the most recent assessments as of September 2012. Reference points for stock size or biomass (BMSY or proxy), Minimum Stock Size Threshold (MSST), and fishing mortality (FMSY or proxy) are indicated by dashed lines. When available, the target fishing mortality (FACT) used to calculate the catch limit for 2012 is also shown. Definitions of stock size and fishing mortality differ for the different stocks; for some stocks fishing mortality corresponds to 1 – SPR (one minus the reduction in spawning biomass per recruit). The vertical arrow in the fishing mortality plot indicates the first year of the Rebuilding Plan. Lines are colored according to overfishing status since 1997 (for B or F), as classified in the annual reports to Congress. Mismatches between the line color and the values of B or F relative to reference points (e.g., red instead of green when biomass is larger than BMSY) are due to differences between the initial assessment (used for overfishing status classification, shown by the color code) and the most recent assessment. The point at the end of each time series is colored according to overfishing status in the report to Congress of September 2012. SOURCE: Estimates provided by National Marine Fisheries Service, complemented in some cases by information provided by the assessment authors and obtained from assessment reports. The time series plots and the data from which they were calculated are available electronically at http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=18488 and click on “Related Resources.” Additional information regarding the nation’s fish species and stocks can be found at https:/www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/sisPortalMain.jsp.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Time Series Plots." National Research Council. 2014. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Fish Stock Rebuilding Plans in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18488.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Time Series Plots." National Research Council. 2014. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Fish Stock Rebuilding Plans in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18488.
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Page 143
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Time Series Plots." National Research Council. 2014. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Fish Stock Rebuilding Plans in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18488.
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Page 144
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In the United States (U.S.), the Fishery Conservation and Management Act of 1976, now known as the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSFCMA), was the first major legislation to regulate federal fisheries in the U.S. Fishery Conservation Zone (later designated as the U.S. exclusive economic zone). The re-authorization of the MSFCMA passed by Congress in 2006 included additional mandates for conserving and rebuilding fish stocks and strengthening the role of scientific advice in fisheries management. Approximately 20% of the fisheries that have been assessed are considered overfished according to the September 2012 stock status Report to Congress prepared by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Overfished refers to a stock that is below the minimum stock size threshold, commonly set to half the stock size at which maximum sustainable yield (MSY) is achieved. Under the provisions of the MSFCMA, rebuilding plans for overfished stocks should take no more than 10 years, except when certain provisions apply. Rebuilding mandates have led to substantial reductions in catch and effort for many fisheries, raising concerns about the consequent social and economic impacts to the fishing communities and industry.

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Fish Stock Rebuilding Plans in the United States reviews the technical specifications that underlie current federally-implemented rebuilding plans, and the outcomes of those plans. According to this report, fisheries management has evolved substantially since 1977 when the U.S. extended its jurisdiction to 8 200 miles, in the direction of being more prescriptive and precautionary in terms of preventing overfishing and rebuilding overfished fisheries. However, the trade-offs between precaution and yield have not been fully evaluated. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Fish Stock Rebuilding Plans in the United States discusses the methods and criteria used to set target fishing mortality and biomass levels for rebuilding overfished stocks, and to determine the probability that a particular stock will rebuild by a certain date. This report will be of interest to the fishing industry, ecology professionals, and members of Congress as they debate the renewal of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act.

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