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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1993. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1881.
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Index

A

Abortion, 287-288

Abrams, Donald, 100

Academic medicine, 57, 99-100

Acer, David J., 62

Activism, see Advocacy and activist groups

ACT-UP, 92, 94, 96, 119, 166-168, 264-265

Adoption, 208, 209-210

Advocacy and activist groups, 8, 14

cancer patients, 99

and drug development and approval, 89-92, 95-97, 101-102, 104, 107-108, 167-168

in New York City, 263-265

see also ACT-UP;

Community-based organizations;

Gay Men's Health Crisis

African Americans, 42, 171-172

churches, 123, 142-143, 149-150

and clinical research, 87, 104-105

gay men, 265-266

incarceration of, 16, 178, 179, 281

in New York City, 251-252, 275

AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), 92, 94, 95-97, 98, 102, 105-107

AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, see ACT-UP

AIDS/HIV Experimental Treatment Directory, 101, 110

AIDS National Interfaith Network, 140

AIDS-related complex, 16, 91, 92

AIDS Treatment News, 101, 110

Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), 212, 213-214

Almarez, Rudolph, 61

Alternative therapies, 90, 99

American Foundation for AIDS Research, 101, 110

American Medical Association, 28, 32

Amphotericin B, 49

Antibody testing, see Testing and screening

ARC, see AIDS-related complex

Asymptomatic HIV-positive population, 21, 24, 29, 92

in prisons, 16, 186-187

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1993. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1881.
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Atlanta Declaration, 140

AZT, 52, 59, 67, 70, 91-92, 98, 105, 106-108, 191

B

Baltimore, Almarez case, 61

STD clinics, 40

Barrier protection, in health care settings, 12, 67-68

see also Condoms

Behavioral risks

criminal endangerment, 35-37

modification of, 25, 26, 37-38

and religion, 15, 141

see also Intravenous drug use and users;

Sexual behavior

Belmont report, 87-88

Bergalis, Kimberly, 62

Black Death, see Bubonic plague

Black population, see African Americans

Blacks Educating Blacks about Sexual Health issues, 150

Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, 59

Blood donation, 161-162

Boarder babies, 206-207, 290

Braschi v. Stahl Associates Co., 230, 232-235

Breast cancer, patient activism, 99

Britt, Harry, 221-222, 227

Broder, Samuel, 91

Bronchoscopies, 71

Bubonic plague, 5, 6, 7, 125

Budgets, see Costs of care;

Financing

Burroughs-Wellcome, 67, 91, 92, 167

C

Cancer

clinical trials, 100

hospice care, 52

patient activism, 99

Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial, 104

Caregivers, see Health care workers;

Volunteers and volunteer organizations

Case definition, expansion of, 21

Case management, 11, 53-55

in Miami, 208

in New York City, 205-206

Cases, see Incidence

Catastrophic health insurance claims, 46

Catholicism, see Roman Catholicism

Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 21, 23-24, 31, 32-33, 59, 119-120

Certification of professionals, 41, 55, 68

Charitable contributions, 123, 161, 169-171

Children, 17-18, 105, 131, 203-215, 236-237, 279

in clinical trials, 18, 105, 218-219

of infected mothers, 18, 203-204, 289

in New York City, 279, 289-291

see also Foster care;

Perinatal transmission

Cholera, 5, 126

Christian Broadcasting Network, 131

Christianity, 123, 127-129

doctrinal responses to AIDS, 15, 129-149 passim

and epidemics, 5, 6, 125-127

Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), 103-104

Churches, see Religion and religious groups

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 143-144

Citizens' Commission on AIDS, 295

Civil rights, see Rights and liberties

Clinical research, see Clinical trials;

Drugs, development of;

Experimental treatment

Clinical trials, 13, 95-97, 99-104

access to, 100, 104-108

advisory boards for, 83, 96, 97

and alternative treatments, 99

AZT, 91

and children, 18, 105, 218-219

double-blind, 82

ethical issues, 82-84, 87-88, 103, 105, 107-108, 112-113

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1993. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1881.
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parallel track, 13, 93-95

randomized, 81-84, 85-87, 111-112

women in, 105-108

Clinics, 38-40, 50, 52-53, 71

Cocaine, 269-271

Community Advisory Boards (CABs), 97

Community-based care, 11, 47, 53-54

case management, 54-55

and clinical trials, 13, 100-102

see also Clinics

Community-based organizations (CBOs), 14-15, 38, 41, 158-161, 164-165, 168-173,

see also Gay Men's Health Crisis

Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP), 100

Community Consortium of Bay Area HIV Care Providers, 97, 100

Compassionate-plea distribution mechanism, 91

Compound Q, 101-102

Condoms, 128, 146-147, 184-185, 292-294

Confidentiality, see Privacy and confidentiality

Consumer activism, see Advocacy and activist groups

Contact tracing, 5-6, 31-33

Correctional system, see Prisons and prisoners

Costs of care, 12, 68-71, 72

clinical trials, 95, 97

control of, 53, 54

volunteers contribution toward, 158

Counseling for HIV testing, 27-28

Criminal statutes, 36-37

Cryptococcal meningitis, 49

Cutter incident, 85

Cytomegalovirus retinitis, 52

D

Death and dying, 52, 160-161

Delaney, Martin, 101-102

Dentists, with AIDS, 61

Dideoxyinosine (ddI), 94-95, 97, 105

Dignity USA, 136

Disclosure, see Informed consent;

Partner notification;

Reporting of cases

Divine punishment, plagues as, 15, 125-126, 128

Doctors, see Physicians

Domestic partnerships, 18, 219-221, 237-238

in New York City, 18, 230-236

San Francisco ordinance, 18, 221-230

Drugs, 67

access to, 12, 70, 91, 92, 95, 97, 100

alternative, 90

development of, 13-14, 67, 80-81, 97-99

regulation of, 13-14, 84-87, 90, 92-95, 112

see also Amphotericin B;

AZT;

Clinical trials;

Compound Q;

Dideoxyinosine;

Fluconazole;

Gancyclovir;

HPA-23;

Intravenous drug use and users;

Methadone maintenance programs;

Pentamidine;

Suramin;

Vaccines

E

Early identification and treatment, 28, 29, 30-32, 40, 42

Economic issues, see Costs of care;

Financing

Education programs, 10, 25-26, 38, 42, 68, 119-120

in prisons, 17, 184-185

professional, 41, 68

and religion, 15, 133-135, 146, 151, 292-294

Elixer sulfanilamide, 84

Ellenberg, Susan, 96

Emergency medical care, 66

Epidemics, 1, 5-6, 9, 58-59, 158

religious response to, 5, 6, 124-127, 128-129

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1993. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1881.
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Ethical issues

clinical trials, 82-84, 87-88, 103, 105, 107-108, 112-113

physicians' duty to inform, 33-34

professional obligation, 65-66, 66

Europe, plagues in, 5, 65-66

Evangelical Lutheran Church, 144

Exceptionalist approach, 10, 26-27, 42

Experimental treatment

of children, 18, 217-219, 290

of prisoners, 17, 192-193

see also Clinical trials

F

Falwell, Jerry, 131

Families, 17-18, 201-203, 236-237

see also Children;

Domestic partnerships

Fauci, Anthony, 94, 96-97

Faya v. Almarez, 61

Federal aid programs

child and family, 210-212

health care services, 47, 70

public health agencies, 23, 33, 36, 41, 63

see also Aid to Families with Dependent Children;

Medicaid;

Medicare

Feinstein, Dianne, 222

Felony transmission, 36-37

Fetal transmission, see Perinatal transmission

Financing

charitable contributions, 123, 161, 169-171

correctional system, 17

government, 14, 24

health care, 11, 12, 47, 68-72

pediatric programs, 210-215

public health, 10, 40

of volunteer groups, 14-15, 169-171

see also Costs of care;

Federal aid programs

Fluconazole, 49

Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, 85

Food and Drug Administration (FDA), 85, 86, 87, 91, 92-93, 97, 102 , 167

Foster care, 18, 105, 210, 213-215, 218

in Miami, 209

in New York City, 206-208, 209-210

Fundamentalist beliefs, 131-136, 143

G

Gancyclovir, 52

Gay community, 8-9, 10, 26-28, 41-42, 104

activism, 92, 166-169, 263-265

domestic partnerships, 18, 219-236, 237-238

in New York City, 256, 258-268, 272-273

as patients, 64, 100

in prisons, 186, 187

and religion, 15, 119, 127-149 passim, 226-227

volunteerism and volunteer groups, 14-15, 158, 160, 162-163, 168-172 , 265

Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC), 28, 101, 160, 162, 169, 170, 262-263 , 264, 267-268

Government, see Federal aid programs;

Prisons and prisoners;

Public health systems;

Regulations;

State public health and welfare systems

Greeley, Andrew, 132-133

Guidelines, clinical trials, 105, 106

HIV-positive health care workers, 62-63

infection control, 12, 59, 62-63

H

Harlem Hospital, 289-291

Hatch, Orrin, 63

Health care system, 7-8, 11-13, 46-48

financing, 11, 12, 47, 68-72

in New York City, 271-279

service delivery, 48-50, 71-72

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1993. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1881.
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see also Clinics;

Community-based care;

Drugs;

Health care workers;

Home health care;

Hospices;

Hospitals;

Inpatient care;

Medical devices and equipment;

Nurses;

Nursing homes;

Physicians;

Testing and screening

Health care workers, 29, 55, 72

avoidance of HIV patients, 12, 48, 56-57, 64-66

with HIV, 61-63

occupational risks, 58-61

shortages, 12, 57

training and certification, 41, 55-57, 68

transmission between workers and patients, 11, 12, 29, 49, 58-63

Health insurance, 11, 46, 47, 171

and case management, 54

enrollment practices, 12, 46, 69-70

and home-based care, 53

and unmarried partnerships, 223, 224, 229

see also Medicaid;

Medicare

Health Resources and Services Administration, 41

Hepatitis B, 64

Heroic interventions, 90

Heroin, 268-269

High-technology care, 52, 53

Hispanic community, 151, 171-172

gay men, 265-267

in New York City, 265-267, 277-278

Hockenberry, Clint, 228-229

Home health care, 53, 68, 71, 165

Homosexuality, viewed as a sin, 15, 127-149 passim

see also Gay community

Hospices, 51-52, 165

Hospitalization, 12, 52-53

Hospitals, 28, 48-49, 50-51, 53

in New York City, 68-69, 271-274

volunteers in, 163-164

Housing rights, New York City case, 18, 230-236

HPA-23, 90

Hudson, Rock, 90

Human experimentation, 87-88, 113,

see also Clinical trials

I

Immunization, see Vaccines

Incarnation Children's Center (ICC), 290-291

Incidence, 1, 7, 61, 67

among health care workers, 61

among hospital patients, 59-60

among prisoners, 16, 180-181

calculation of, 19-21

in New York City, 245-259

Incubation period, 19-21

Indiana v. Haines, 37

Indigent care, 11, 38-39, 40

Individual rights, see Privacy and confidentiality;

Rights and liberties

Infants, see Children;

Maternity and pregnancy;

Perinatal transmission

Infection, see Incidence;

Transmission of HIV

Influenza pandemic, 6

Informed consent

for invasive procedures, 63

for testing, 26, 27-28, 29

Inmates, see Prisons and prisoners

Inpatient care, 48-49, 50, 53

Institutional review boards, 88

Insurance, see Health insurance;

Uninsured population

Interferon, 103-104

Internal medicine, 56-57

International AIDS Conference, 95-96

Intravenous drug use and users, 9, 10, 42, 104, 141

community-based organizations, 171-173

in New York City, 256-257, 268-271, 272

in prisons, 184, 190-191, 280

see also Methadone maintenance programs

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1993. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1881.
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Intravenous pumps, 53

Invasive procedures, 29, 62-63

Investigational new drug (IND) mechanisms, 91, 93-94

Isolation, see Quarantine;

Segregation of HIV-positive population

J

Joseph, Stephen, 30-31, 35

Journals, peer-reviewed, 13-14, 38, 108-109

Judaism, 123, 127, 130, 145

Jungle, The, 84

K

Kaposi's sarcoma, 90

Kefauver-Harris amendments, 85, 86-87

Kramer, Larry, 160, 166

Kubler-Ross, Elizabeth, 161

L

Latinos, see Hispanic community

Law, see Criminal statutes;

Public health systems;

Quarantine;

Regulations

Lawsuits, 61

Legal services, 165

Local health departments, 38-40

Los Angeles, 151

M

Male nurses, 58

Mandatory testing

of government employees, 28

of health care workers, 29, 62, 63

of newborns, 17-18, 28-29

of pregnant women, 17-18, 28-29

of prison inmates, 180, 181-182

Marketing of products and services, 67-68

Marriage, 220-221

Mass media, 111

Maternity and pregnancy, 17-18, 26, 247, 251, 286-289

and AZT, 106-108

and clinical trials, 105-108

among prison inmates, 179

see also Perinatal transmission

Medicaid, 31, 40, 69, 70, 210-211

Medical devices and equipment, 53, 67-68

Medicare, 47, 56, 70

Methadone maintenance programs, 39, 184

Methodists, 148-149

Miami, family and child programs, 208-210

Military recruits, testing policies, 28

Modeling of incidence, 20-21

Models and model programs, 33, 39-40, 50, 54, 58

Montefiore Medical Center, 40, 188

Moral Majority, 131

Mormons, 143-144

Mothers, see Maternity and pregnancy

Myers, Woodrow, 31, 35

N

Named reporting, 30-31

National AIDS Information and Education Program, 119-120

National Black Church Consortium on Critical Health Care Needs, 143

National Cancer Institute (NCI), 91, 97, 100, 109

National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects, 87-88

National Commission on AIDS, 63

National Community AIDS Partnership, 170

National Council of Churches of Christ in the U.S.A., 129

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), 96, 101

see also AIDS Clinical Trials Groups

National Institutes of Health, 34, 104, 106

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1993. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1881.
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National Partnership Program, 119-120

Newborns, see Maternity and pregnancy;

Perinatal transmission

New England Journal of Medicine, 87, 109

New Jersey, case reporting, 31

Newsletters, 101, 110

New York City, 19, 243-245, 295-296

correctional system, 280-285 passim

domestic partnerships, 18, 230-236

drug use and users, 256-257, 268-271, 272

family and child programs, 205-208, 212-213

gay community, 256, 258-268, 272-273

health care system and policies, 30-31, 32, 35, 246, 271-279

incidence and distribution of HIV, 245-259

sex education, 292-294

New York City Task Force on Single-Disease Hospitals, 50-51

Nurses, 12, 57-58, 66

with AIDS, 61

staffing shortages, 12, 57

Nursing homes, 52

O

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 59

Opportunistic diseases

and clinical trials, 103, 105

drug development, 98-99

see also Pneumocystis carinii

Ordination of gays and lesbians, 140-141

Orphan Drug Act, 67

Outpatient care, 69, 71-72

see also Clinics;

Home health care

P

Parallel track mechanism, 13, 93-95

Pare, Ambrose, 125

Parents, rights of, 17-18, 216-218

Parole, 194

Partner notification, 26, 32-34

Patient activism, see Advocacy and activist groups

Patient rights, 11, 26, 89, 90

Peer-review process, 13-14, 108-110

Pentamidine, 90, 100, 191

Perinatal transmission, 17, 106-108, 202, 288-289

Pestilence, see Epidemics;

Plagues

Physicians, 28, 55, 100

with AIDS, 61

avoidance of HIV patients, 12, 48, 56-57, 64-66

career choices impacts of AIDS, 11-12, 56-57, 72

duty to inform, 33-34

in New York City, 273-274

occupational risks, 58-59

professional obligation, 65-66

Plagues, 1, 5-6, 9, 58-59, 158

bubonic (Black Death), 5, 6, 7, 125

as divine punishment, 15, 125-126, 128

physicians's duties during, 65-66

Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), 29, 51, 71, 90, 91, 92, 98

Polio, 98

vaccine, 83-84, 85

Poverty and the poor

experimental drug access, 95

incarceration of, 16, 179

in New York City, 267-268, 275-276, 279

pregnancy and children, 217, 279

see also Indigent care

Pregnancy, see Maternity and pregnancy;

Perinatal transmission

Presbyterian Church, U.S.A., 145-146

Presidential Commission on the HIV Epidemic, 36

Preventive medicine, 37-38, 40

Primary care

and clinical trials, 100

specialties, 56-57

Prisons and prisoners, 16-17, 176-181, 195-196

conjugal visits, 187, 296n

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1993. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1881.
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health care systems, 17, 188-194, 283-285

isolation of HIV-positive inmates, 16-17, 177, 185-187

in New York, 16, 17, 180-181, 190, 280-285

screening of inmates, 16, 176-177, 180-182

seroprevalence of inmates, 16, 180-181

transfer and release, 193-194

Privacy and confidentiality, 11, 17-18, 26, 217

and case reporting, 25, 26, 30-31

and contact tracing, 32

and physicians' duty to inform, 33-34

in prisons, 181

Professional obligation, 65-66

Project Inform, 28, 101-102, 110

Prostitution, 37

Protocol 076, 106-108

Provider referral model, 33

Psychological support services, 165-166

Publications, see Journals, peer-reviewed;

Newsletters

Public Health Service, 70, 110

Public health systems, 5-6, 9-11, 21, 23-27, 41-43

criminal statutes, 36-37

in New York City, 274-279

as primary care provider, 24, 38-40, 42-43

testing policies, 28-29

see also Clinics;

Contact tracing;

Medicaid;

Partner notification;

Preventive medicine;

Quarantine;

Reporting of cases;

State public health and welfare systems

Puerto Ricans, 277-278

Pure Food and Drug Act, 84

Q

Quarantine, 5, 25, 26-27, 34-36

Quinn, John R., 138-139

R

Racial and ethnic groups, 29, 42

community-based organizations, 171-172

gay men, 265-267

incarceration of, 16, 179, 281

in New York, 265-267, 273, 275-276, 277-278, 288-289

see also specific groups

Randomized clinical trials, 81-84, 85-87, 111-112

Ratzinger, Cardinal, 146

Recruitment of professionals, 55-58

Registries, 25, 26, 30

Regulations

drugs, 13-14, 84-87, 90, 92-95, 112

home-based care, 53

prisoner protection, 17, 192-193

Religion and religious groups, 15-16, 117-124

as care providers, 15, 130, 139-140, 149-153

doctrinal responses to AIDS, 15-16, 129-149, 152-153

and epidemics, 5, 6, 124-127, 128-129

and gay community and lifestyle, 15, 119, 127-149 passim, 226-227

Rent-controlled housing, New York City case, 230-236

Reporting of cases, 21, 25, 26, 30-31

Research, see Clinical trials;

Drugs, development of;

Experimental treatment;

Human experimentation;

Peer-review process

Rights and liberties, 8, 25-26, 216

and mandatory testing, 17-18

of parents, 17-18, 216-218

of patients, 11, 26, 89, 90

and quarantine, 35

see also Privacy and confidentiality

Rikers Island, New York City, 188, 283-284

Risk of infection, see Behavioral risks;

Intravenous drug use and users;

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1993. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1881.
×

Sexual behavior;

Transmission of HIV

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 170

Roman Catholicism, 128, 129-130, 134-135, 136, 139, 146-147, 151-152, 292-293

Rossi v. Almarez, 61

Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act, 36, 41, 54, 211

S

Salk, Jonas, 83

Sammons, James, 32

San Francisco, 50, 139

domestic partnership ordinance, 18, 221-230

San Francisco General Hospital, 50, 58

Screening, see Testing and screening

Second Presbyterian Church, Kansas City, Mo., 149

Segregation of HIV-positive population

in hospitals, 50-51

in prisons, 16-17, 177, 185-187

Sentencing, 37, 194

Sex education, religious objections to, 15, 292-294

Sexual behavior, 38, 202, 255-256, 261-263, 266

and contact tracing, 32

in prisons, 16, 183-185, 202

religious censure of, 15, 126, 127-149 passim

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), 5-6, 38, 262, 275

clinics, 39-40

as public health model, 28, 32-33

Shanti Project, 165

Sider, Ronald, 135

Sierra Health Foundation, 55

Single-disease medical centers, 50-51, 70

Socially marginalized groups, see Gay community;

Intravenous drug use and users;

Poverty and the poor;

Racial and ethnic groups

Soluble CD4, 97

Southern Baptist Convention, 123, 135, 138, 140

Specialization of health care, 11-12, 49-51, 55-57

Spousal notification, 34

Staffing, see Health care workers;

Nurses;

Physicians

Stanley, Charles, 138

State public health and welfare systems, 23, 40-41, 212-214, 218-219

case reporting, 31

contact tracing, 32-33

criminal statutes, 36-37

quarantine, 35-36

see also Aid to Families with Dependent Children;

Medicaid

State v. Kearns, 37

Stigmatized groups, see Gay community;

Intravenous drug use and users;

Poverty and the poor;

Racial and ethnic groups

Streptomycin trials, 83

Suicide, 165-166

Sullivan, Louis, 63

Suramin, 90-91

Surrogate markers, 103-104

Surveillance systems, 21, 23-24

Swing, William E., 138

Syphilis, Tuskegee experiment, 87

T

Tarasoff v. Regents of the University of California, 33

Telephone hotlines, 110

Televangelism, 130

Testing and screening, 27-29

behavior modification role of, 27

of government employees, 28

of health care workers, 29, 62

for health insurance, 69-70

of infants and children, 204, 215-218

informed consent, 26, 27-28, 29

of military recruits, 28

of newborns, 28-29

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1993. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1881.
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of pregnant women, 17-18, 28-29, 215-216

for tuberculosis, 39

Thalidomide, 85

Theology, see Religion and religious groups

Therapeutic agents, see Drugs

Therapeutic indifference, 82-83

Transmission of HIV

perinatal, 17, 106-108, 202, 288-289

among prisoners, 16, 182-184

between providers and patients, 11, 12, 29, 49, 58-63

Treatment Issues, 101

Tuberculosis, 36, 39, 188-189, 275-277

as public health practices model, 30-31

streptomycin trials, 83

Tuskegee syphilis experiment, 87

U

Uninsured population, 11, 12-13, 46, 69

Union of American Hebrew Congregations, see Judaism

United Methodist Church, 148-149

Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches, 129

Universal precautions, 12, 59, 62, 68

University of Medicine and Dentistry, Newark, 60

Unmarried couples, see Domestic partnerships

U.S. Catholic Conference, 146, 147

V

Vaccines, 67

for polio, 83-84, 85

Venereal diseases, see Sexually transmitted diseases

Volunteers and volunteer organizations, 8, 14-15, 158-166, 173, 265

and drug users, 172-173

and minorities, 171-172

see also Advocacy and activist groups;

Community-based organizations;

Gay Men's Health Crisis

W

Whitman-Walker Clinic, 165

Women

in clinical trials, 105-108

and cocaine, 269-271

incarceration of, 179, 280-281

in New York City, 251-253, 257, 258, 269-271, 278, 286-289

see also Maternity and pregnancy

Workers' compensation, 60-61

Y

Yarchoan, Robert, 91

Yellow fever, 125-126

Z

Zidovudine, see AZT

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1993. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1881.
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Europe's "Black Death" contributed to the rise of nation states, mercantile economies, and even the Reformation. Will the AIDS epidemic have similar dramatic effects on the social and political landscape of the twenty-first century? This readable volume looks at the impact of AIDS since its emergence and suggests its effects in the next decade, when a million or more Americans will likely die of the disease.

The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States addresses some of the most sensitive and controversial issues in the public debate over AIDS. This landmark book explores how AIDS has affected fundamental policies and practices in our major institutions, examining

  • How America's major religious organizations have dealt with sometimes conflicting values: the imperative of care for the sick versus traditional views of homosexuality and drug use.
  • Hotly debated public health measures, such as HIV antibody testing and screening, tracing of sexual contacts, and quarantine.
  • The potential risk of HIV infection to and from health care workers.
  • How AIDS activists have brought about major change in the way new drugs are brought to the marketplace.
  • The impact of AIDS on community-based organizations, from volunteers caring for individuals to the highly political ACT-UP organization.
  • Coping with HIV infection in prisons.

Two case studies shed light on HIV and the family relationship. One reports on some efforts to gain legal recognition for nonmarital relationships, and the other examines foster care programs for newborns with the HIV virus. A case study of New York City details how selected institutions interact to give what may be a picture of AIDS in the future.

This clear and comprehensive presentation will be of interest to anyone concerned about AIDS and its impact on the country: health professionals, sociologists, psychologists, advocates for at-risk populations, and interested individuals.

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