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Beam Technologies for Integrated Processing (1992)

Chapter: APPENDIX B: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1992. Beam Technologies for Integrated Processing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2006.
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APPENDIX B
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

DAVID RICHMAN received his BS degree in 1954 from Yale University and his PhD degree in 1959 from Cornell University, both in physical chemistry. He joined RCA Laboratories as a staff member in 1959, became head of semiconductor materials research in 1970, and was made director of the Materials Processing Research Laboratory of the David Sarnoff Research Center in 1979. In 1991 he was appointed adjunct professor at the Stevens Institute of Technology and director of the Consortia for Surface Processing at David Sarnoff Research Center. He received the David Sarnoff Award in 1967 and the RCA Laboratories Outstanding Achievement Award in 1969. He is a member of Sigma Xi, the American Chemical Society, the Electrochemical Society, the American Association for Crystal Growth, and the AIME Electronic Materials Committee. Dr. Richman is a prime investigator at SEMATECH and is a member of the New Jersey Governor's Round Table on Superconductors. His areas of expertise include crystal growth, polymer processing, thin film technology, materials characterization, vapor-phase growth, and video disc development and manufacture.

ROINTAN F. BUNSHAH received his BSc degree in 1948 from Benares Hindu University and his MS degree in 1951 and DSc degree in 1952 from Carnegie Institute of Technology, all in metallurgy. He worked as research metallurgist and instructor in the Metals Research Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Technology from 1952 to 1954; as research scientist and adjunct professor at New York University from 1954 to 1960; and as senior metallurgist at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory from 1960 to 1969. Since 1969 he has been a professor of engineering at the University of California at Los Angeles. He received the Hadfield Medal of the Geological Mining and Metallurgical Institute of India in 1948 and the Graede-Langmuir Award of the American Vacuum Society in 1986. He is a member and fellow of the American Society for Metals International, an honorary life member of the American Vacuum Society (president 1970-1971), and an honorary life member of the Indian Vacuum Society. His areas of expertise include vacuum metallurgy, dispersion strengthening of metals, ultrahigh vacuum techniques, plasma-assisted physical and chemical vapor deposition processes, electronic and optoelectronic materials, and super-hard coatings for wear resistance.

ALFRED Y. CHO received his BSEE degree in 1960, his MS degree in 1961, and his PhD degree in 1968, from the University of Illinois, all in electrical engineering. He worked with the technical staff in research at the Ion Physics Corporation from 1961 to 1962 and at the Science Technology Laboratory of TRW from 1962 to 1965 and as research assistant in electrical engineering at the University of Illinois from 1965 to 1968. He joined AT&T Bell Laboratories as a member of the technical staff in 1968 and became research department head in 1984. He is director of AT&T Bell Laboratories Semiconductor Research Laboratory. Dr. Cho received the International Prize in New Materials of the American Physical Society in 1982, the Morris N. Liebmann Award of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in 1982, the Solid State Science and Technology Medal of the Electrochemical Society in 1987, and the Graede-Langmuir Award of the American Vacuum Society in 1988. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in 1985. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Physical Society, the American Vacuum Society, the Electrochemical Society, the New York Academy of Sciences, the Materials Research Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His areas of expertise include thin film technology, molecular beam epitaxy for growth of semiconductors, insulators, and metal film layers for microwave and optoelectronic component fabrication.

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1992. Beam Technologies for Integrated Processing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2006.
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STEPHEN M. COPLEY received his AA degree in 1957, his BA degree in 1959 in physics, his MS degree in 1961, and his PhD degree in 1964 in engineering science from the University of California at Berkeley. He joined the Advanced Materials Research and Development Laboratory of Pratt and Whitney Aircraft in 1964 and served as supervisor of the Alloy and Materials Research Section from 1968 to 1970. He was a faculty member of the University of Southern California from 1970 to 1990 and held the Kenneth T. Norris Chair of Metallurgical Engineering. He is professor and chairman of the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department at Illinois Institute of Technology and serves as vice provost of the Academic Planning and Budgeting and as director of the Center for Manufacturing and Materials Process Engineering. Dr. Copley is a fellow and trustee of the ASM INTERNATIONAL and is currently president of the society. He is also a member of the Metallurgical Society of the AIME, the American Ceramic Society, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, the Materials Research Society, and Sigma Xi. He received the Education Achievement Award in 1975 and the Educator of the Year Award in 1976, both from the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. His areas of expertise include laser systems, applications of lasers as a directed heat source for shaping, joining and modifying properties of surfaces, and synthesis of amorphous and crystalline metastable phases by lasers.

TERRY D. GULDEN received his BS degree in 1960 in ceramics from the University of Washington and his MS degree in 1962 and PhD degree in 1965 from Stanford University in materials science. He worked as a ceramist at the United Technologies Center from 1960 to 1961 and as research associate at the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratory from 1965 to 1966. He held numerous staff and management positions since 1966 with the General Atomics Company, where he is director of advanced materials technology. Dr. Gulden is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Ceramic Society, and the Materials Research Society. His areas of expertise include radiation effects in solids, transmission electron microscopy, internal friction, chemical vapor deposition, creep and deformation behavior of ceramics and metals, and nuclear reactor and composite materials development.

CONILEE G. KIRKPATRICK received her BS degree in 1969 and her MS degree in 1970, both from Washington University, and her PhD degree in 1974 from the University of Illinois, all in electrical engineering. She worked at the General Electric Company's Research and Development Center as staff physicist in electrical engineering from 1974 to 1979. She joined the Microelectronics Research and Development Center of Rockwell International in 1979 as principal scientist, and was later director of GaAs Operations, where she directed the construction and operation of a digital and microwave GaAs integrated circuits pilot line and also managed the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) GaAs Pilot Line Program. In 1988 she became senior scientist at Science Applications International Corporation, focusing on neural network technology. Dr. Kirkpatrick has served as consultant to the Electronics Division of the Electrochemical Society. She is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Society of Women Engineers, and the American Physical Society. Her areas of expertise include ion implantation; growth of compound semiconductors; radiation effects on solids; semiconductors; and memory, display, and integrated circuit devices.

ROBERT D. MAURER received his BS degree in 1948 from the University of Arkansas and his PhD degree in 1951 in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was given an honorary LLD degree by the University of Arkansas in 1980. He served as a member of the physics staff at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1951 to 1952. Dr. Maurer worked at Corning Glass Works as a physicist from 1952 to 1962, as senior research associate from 1962 to 1963, as manager of applied physics from 1963 to 1978, and was made research fellow from 1978 until his retirement in 1989. He received the George W. Morey Award of the American Ceramic Society in 1976, the Morris N. Liebmann Award of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in 1978, the Industrial Applied Physics Prize of the American Institute of Physics in 1978, the Ericsson

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1992. Beam Technologies for Integrated Processing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2006.
×

International Prize in Telecommunications in 1979, and the IEEE/OSA Tyndall Award in 1989. Dr. Maurer is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, member and fellow of the American Ceramic Society, member and fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and member of the American Physical Society. His major areas of expertise include the physical behavior of glasses and optical communications.

JAMES M. MIKKELSON received his BS, his MS, and his EE degrees in 1972 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, all in electrical engineering. He was a member of the technical staff and project manager at Hewlett-Packard Company from 1973 to 1984, where he was responsible for the development of very large scale integration (VLSI) metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) processes and refractory metal interconnections. In 1984 he was one of the founders of Vitesse Semiconductor Corporation, where he is vice president of technology development. Mr. Mikkelson is a member of Tau Beta Xi, Sigma Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Vacuum Society and the International Society for Hybrid Microelectronics. He received the Outstanding Paper Award from the 1981 International Solid State Circuits Conference. His areas of expertise include semiconductor device physics and modeling; semiconductor process architecture, design, and development; compound semiconductor processing; beam processing of integrated circuits; integrated circuit process equipment integration; circuit design; and yield improvement.

ANTHONY J. PERROTTA received his BS degree in ceramics in 1960 from Pennsylvania State University and his MS degree in 1962 and PhD degree in 1965 from the University of Chicago in mineralogy-crystallography. He worked as a physical scientist in ceramics, mineralogy, and crystallography at the Union Carbide Corporation Research Institute from 1967 to 1969 and as senior research scientist at Gulf Research & Development Center from 1969 to 1985. Since 1985 he has been an ALCOA fellow at the ALCOA Technical Center. He is a member of the Materials Research Society, the Metallurgical Society of American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME), the American Ceramic Society, and the Sigma Xi. His areas of expertise include crystal structure, phase equilibria, and thermal and catalytic properties of mineralogical and ceramic materials.

NORMAN E. SCHUMAKER received his BS degree in chemistry in 1963 from Wabash College and his MS degree in 1965 and his PhD degree in 1968, both in physical chemistry, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He worked as a member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories from 1968 to 1984 and in 1984 founded Emcore Corporation, where he is president and chief executive officer. Dr. Schumaker is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Chemical Society, the American Electrochemical Society, and the American Physical Society. He is also a member of Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, and Delta Phi Delta. His areas of expertise include advanced materials and process technology development, electron beam and molecular beam epitaxy, and MOCVD processing equipment development and manufacture.

PIRAN SIOSHANSI received his BS degree in electrical engineering in 1967, a BS degree in mathematics in 1968, an MS degree in physics in 1969, and a PhD degree in nuclear physics in 1972 from Purdue University. He did postdoctorate work at Straussburg University's Nuclear Research Center from 1972 to 1973; served as director of the Nuclear Research Center in Tehran, Iran, from 1973 to 1978; and was assistant professor at Louisiana State University from 1979 to 1981. Since 1981 Dr. Sioshansi has served as vice president of ion implantation and is vice president of surface engineering at the Spire Corporation. He was given the Employee of the Year Award by the Spire Corporation in 1986. His areas of expertise include ion beam modification of surfaces; materials modification by ion implantation for semiconductors, biological implants, and bearings; wear analysis and measurement; accelerators; trace chemical analysis; and materials implantation in diamond and sapphire

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1992. Beam Technologies for Integrated Processing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2006.
×
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1992. Beam Technologies for Integrated Processing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2006.
×
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1992. Beam Technologies for Integrated Processing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2006.
×
Page 89
Beam Technologies for Integrated Processing Get This Book
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Beam technologies play an important role in microelectronic component fabrication and offer opportunities for application in other manufacturing schemes. Emerging beam technologies that incorporate potential for sensors, control, and information processing have created new opportunities for integrated processing of materials and components.

This volume identifies various beam technologies and their applications in electronics and other potential manufacturing processes. Recommendations for research and development to enhance the understanding, capabilities, and applications of beam technologies are presented.

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