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Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite (1993)

Chapter: A. Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"A. Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
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APPENDIXES

Suggested Citation:"A. Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
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Suggested Citation:"A. Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
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A
Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee

January 6, 1992

David Saumweber, Director, Office of Archives and Information Services, National Academy of Sciences. Historical Background: The Role of the National Academy of Sciences During World War II.

Robert Cook-Deegan, Institute of Medicine; Linda Rosenstock, University of Washington; Bailus Walker, Jr., University of Oklahoma. Poison Gas: A Continuing Threat, Experiences from Korea and Iraq.

April 15-16, 1992

Bruno Papirmeister, Science Applications International Corporation. Current Research into the Biological Mechanisms of Mustard Gas Toxicity.

Frederick Sidell, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense. Clinical Aspects of Mustard Gas.

Howard Skipper, Southern Research Institute (retired). Chemical Warfare Research During World War II.

Robert Ursano, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Psychological Aspects of Chemical Warfare Environments.

Karen Freeman, Pennsylvania State University. Researching the World War II Testing Programs.

Annetta Watson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Outline of Concurrent Activities Dealing with Chemical Weapons Disposal and Risk Assessment.

Suggested Citation:"A. Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
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JUNE 11-12, 1992

Robert L. Dedrick, National Cancer Institute. Toxicology Lessons from Cancer Chemotherapy.

David H. Wegman, University of Massachusetts. Examination of the Effects of Certain Acute Environmental Exposures on Future Respiratory Health Consequences.

O. Michael Colvin, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Nitrogen Mustard Therapy and Second Cancers.

James M. Melius, State of New York Department of Health. The Bhopal Disaster.

Han K. Kang, Department of Veterans Affairs. Feasibility of Developing a Cohort of Veterans Exposed to Mustard Gas During WWII Testing Programs.

Richard Solana, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense. Toxicology of Lewisite.

Peter Sandman, Rutgers University. Communicating Risk.

Jay Katz, Yale University. Informed Consent: History, Development, and Application to Special Populations.

Suggested Citation:"A. Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
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Page 331
Suggested Citation:"A. Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
×
Page 332
Suggested Citation:"A. Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
×
Page 333
Suggested Citation:"A. Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
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Page 334
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Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite Get This Book
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Recently, World War II veterans have come forward to claim compensation for health effects they say were caused by their participation in chemical warfare experiments.

In response, the Veterans Administration asked the Institute of Medicine to study the issue. Based on a literature review and personal testimony from more than 250 affected veterans, this new volume discusses in detail the development and chemistry of mustard agents and Lewisite followed by interesting and informative discussions about these substances and their possible connection to a range of health problems, from cancer to reproductive disorders.

The volume also offers an often chilling historical examination of the use of volunteers in chemical warfare experiments by the U.S. military--what the then-young soldiers were told prior to the experiments, how they were "encouraged" to remain in the program, and how they were treated afterward.

This comprehensive and controversial book will be of importance to policymakers and legislators, military and civilian planners, officials at the Department of Veterans Affairs, military historians, and researchers.

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