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Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock (2020)

Chapter: Appendix B: Open Session Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21742.
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Appendix B

Open Session Agendas

MEETING 1—January 7, 2013

9:00 a.m. Welcome and introductions
David Daniel (NAE), Ph.D., Chair, Committee on Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rocks
9:05 Sponsor expectations
Thomas Nicholson, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Division of Risk Analysis, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research
Mark Schoppet, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Environmental Management Division
10:50 Break
11:00 Perspectives on fractured bedrock across disciplines and scales
Matthew Becker, Ph.D., California State University, Long Beach
12:00 p.m. Working lunch in meeting room; continued discussions
12:30 A recent study of fault zone hydrology
Kenzi Karasaki, Ph.D., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
1:30 Sponsor expectations (cont.)
TBD, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Fuel Disposition
2:00 Open session adjourns

WORKSHOP—May 29–31, 2013

DAY ONE: Wednesday, May 29, 2013

CHARACTERIZING PHYSICAL AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN FRACTURED ROCK

8:00 a.m. Continental breakfast
8:30 Welcome and introductory remarks
David Daniel (NAE), Ph.D., Committee Chair
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21742.
×

SESSION 1: RECENT ADVANCES IN UNDERSTANDING GEOLOGIC AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES

Session Moderator: Allen Shapiro, Ph.D., committee member

8:50 Fractured rock: How did it get that way?
Terry Engelder, Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University
9:20 Hydromechanical coupling
Mark Zoback (NAE), Ph.D., Stanford University
9:50 Contaminant geochemical behavior in fractured rocks: Lessons from porous media
Richelle Allen-King, Ph.D., University at Buffalo
10:20 Break
10:40 Panel discussion
11:40 Lunch

SESSION 2: ENHANCED CHARACTERIZATION

Session Moderator: Kamini Singha, Ph.D., committee member

1:00 p.m. Fracture architecture and mechanical stratigraphy in sedimentary rocks
Michael Gross, Ph.D., Shell Oil
1:30 Advances in the characterization of fractured rock systems beyond the borehole wall using geophysical imaging
Lee Slater, Ph.D., Rutgers University
2:00 Panel discussion
3:00 Break

SESSION 3: SYNTHESIZING CHARACTERIZATION INFORMATION INTO CONCEPTUAL MODELS OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL TRANSPORT

Session Moderator: Bill Dershowitz, Ph.D., committee member

3:20 Experiences from site-descriptive and safety assessment modeling, and input from ongoing research and development plans
Jan-Olof Selroos, Ph.D., Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB)
3:50 Data model synthesis for flow and transport in fractured rocks
Paul Hsieh, Ph.D., U.S. Geological Survey
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21742.
×
4:20 Panel discussion
Jan-Olof Selroos, Ph.D., SKB
Paul Hsieh, Ph.D., U.S. Geological Survey
Kent Novakowski, Ph.D., Queens University
Scott Painter, Ph.D.
5:20 Adjourn for the day

DAY TWO: Thursday, May 30, 2013

REMEDIATION AND MONITORING IN FRACTURED ROCK

8:00 a.m. Continental breakfast
8:30 Welcome and introductory remarks
David Daniel (NAE), Ph.D., Committee Chair

SESSION 4: REMEDIATION IN FRACTURED ROCK

Session Moderator: David Reynolds, Ph.D., committee member

8:45 What is the future of remediation science and technology and how do we prepare?
Jeffrey Marqusee, Ph.D., Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program and Environmental Security Technology Certification Program
9:15 Use of thermal conductive heating to remove chlorinated solvents from fractured bedrock
Bernie Kueper, Ph.D., Queens University
9:45 Biotic/abiotic degradation
Leo Lehmicke, Ph.D., CO2 and Water, Inc.
10:15 Break
10:30 In situ bioremediation of uranium
Steve Yabusaki, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
11:00 Panel discussion
12:00 p.m. Lunch

SESSION 5: MONITORING FOR EARLY INDICATORS OF ENGINEERING PERFORMANCE AND REMEDIATION PROGRESS

Session Moderator: Lynn Orr, Jr., Ph.D., committee member

1:00 Session introduction
1:15 Working group discussions
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21742.
×
Questions for working groups:
  1. What processes could be monitored as early indicators of good or bad performance of engineered systems?
  2. Given monitoring data collection technologies, what strategies can be applied to get more out of collected data?
  3. What new approaches to monitoring could be applied, given current technologies, that might reduce performance uncertainties in monitoring for radionuclides, organics, and metals?
  4. What new and emerging technologies employing new strategic approaches could be applied to monitor system performance and reduce uncertainties in monitoring for radionuclides, organics, and metals? What do we do to get there?
2:30 Working group summaries provided in plenary session
3:00 Large group discussion

CONCLUDING REMARKS

4:00 Closing remarks
David Daniel (NAE), Ph.D., Committee Chair
4:30 Workshop adjourns
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21742.
×
Page 161
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21742.
×
Page 162
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21742.
×
Page 163
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21742.
×
Page 164
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Fractured rock is the host or foundation for innumerable engineered structures related to energy, water, waste, and transportation. Characterizing, modeling, and monitoring fractured rock sites is critical to the functioning of those infrastructure, as well as to optimizing resource recovery and contaminant management. Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock examines the state of practice and state of art in the characterization of fractured rock and the chemical and biological processes related to subsurface contaminant fate and transport. This report examines new developments, knowledge, and approaches to engineering at fractured rock sites since the publication of the 1996 National Research Council report Rock Fractures and Fluid Flow: Contemporary Understanding and Fluid Flow. Fundamental understanding of the physical nature of fractured rock has changed little since 1996, but many new characterization tools have been developed, and there is now greater appreciation for the importance of chemical and biological processes that can occur in the fractured rock environment.

The findings of Characterization, Modeling, Monitoring, and Remediation of Fractured Rock can be applied to all types of engineered infrastructure, but especially to engineered repositories for buried or stored waste and to fractured rock sites that have been contaminated as a result of past disposal or other practices. The recommendations of this report are intended to help the practitioner, researcher, and decision maker take a more interdisciplinary approach to engineering in the fractured rock environment. This report describes how existing tools—some only recently developed—can be used to increase the accuracy and reliability of engineering design and management given the interacting forces of nature. With an interdisciplinary approach, it is possible to conceptualize and model the fractured rock environment with acceptable levels of uncertainty and reliability, and to design systems that maximize remediation and long-term performance. Better scientific understanding could inform regulations, policies, and implementation guidelines related to infrastructure development and operations. The recommendations for research and applications to enhance practice of this book make it a valuable resource for students and practitioners in this field.

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