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Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary (2016)

Chapter: Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

Appendix C

Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest
Biographical Sketches

Rajiv Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H., is the founder and director of The Civic Engine. Dr. Bhatia is a physician and health innovator who pioneered several practice innovations, including health impact assessments of public policies, neighborhood health indicators for monitoring urban growth and development, and open data for environmental regulation. His work has demonstrated new roles for the public health sector in solutions to complex social problems and has brought health information and arguments to successful legislative campaigns for higher minimum wages, universal paid sick days, pedestrian safety, and environmental protection. Prior to his creation of The Civic Engine, Dr. Bhatia worked at the San Francisco Health Department, where he created and led the Program on Health Equity and Sustainability, which became a valuable resource for community health advocates and a national model for Health in All Policies. At The Civic Engine, Dr. Bhatia is leading work with health care systems to apply holistic understanding of health and human needs to support new population health improvement strategies. He received his M.D. from Stanford University. He served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on Health Impact Assessment.

Michael Bilton, M.P.P., is senior director, community health and benefit, at Dignity Health, a health system with 38 not-for-profit hospitals in Arizona, California, and Nevada. He is responsible for developing and leading system-wide community health improvement initiatives, providing guidance and consultation on community health needs assessments

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

and implementation strategies, and ensuring the reporting of community benefit programs. He also serves on the team responsible for overall community health strategy. Immediately prior to joining Dignity Health, Mr. Bilton served as vice president at Verité Healthcare Consulting with a focus on needs assessments, implementation strategies, and community benefit reporting. During 14 years at the American Hospital Association, he co-founded and led the Association for Community Health Improvement professional membership group and served as director of community health programs. Bilton also directed a national “healthy communities” project at the Healthcare Forum in San Francisco, and an ambulatory care safety net initiative in Chicago and Cook County, Illinois. He holds a Master of Public Policy with a concentration in Health Administration and Policy from the University of Chicago.

Dale Fleming is the strategy director for the County of San Diego’s Health and Human Services Agency. In this role, she coordinates and supports the implementation of Live Well San Diego, a collective impact effort to realize healthy, safe, and thriving communities and residents throughout the county. In addition, she is the executive director of the county’s Community Action Partnership, which provides services to strengthen economically disadvantaged communities and citizens who reside there. With nearly 30 years of experience in administering health and social services programs, Ms. Fleming has led various strategic planning, policy development, community indicators, and performance measurement initiatives. In addition, she provided executive leadership over the county’s public assistance and health coverage eligibility programs and policies for 6 years.

Dan Gallagher, M.U.P., AICP, is currently a senior regional planner at the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) and a public health planning specialist. He coordinates implementation of regional activities aimed at integrating public health into regional plans, projects, and programs and serves as a liaison between SANDAG and the County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency. He staffs quarterly meetings of the Public Health Stakeholder Working Group at SANDAG and serves as a resource to member agencies working to integrate public health in local plans, projects, and programs. Mr. Gallagher also serves as project manager for the Border Health Equity Transportation Study, the Regional Bike Counter Network Program, and the Healthy Communities Atlas online tool. He has 18 years of experience in transportation and land use planning, working for both state and regional government, including the California Department of Transportation, California High Speed Rail Authority, and California Energy Commission. He has a B.S., cum laude,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

in Landscape Architecture from Arizona State University, and a Master’s Degree in Urban Planning from the University of Virginia.

Mary Lou Goeke, M.S.W., is the executive director of the United Way of Santa Cruz County, California, a position she has held for 20 years. The organization helps residents achieve good health by advocating for children’s health coverage and raising funds for the local Healthy Kids program and other providers of health care to underserved and uninsured individuals. As executive director, she is responsible for the organization’s strategic planning, new program development, and financial oversight, and she serves as a liaison with funded community agencies, the business community, and government partners. Prior to joining the United Way, Ms. Goeke held positions with Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of San Francisco, the American Society of Aging, and the State of Missouri Department of Aging. She currently serves as a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Population Health Improvement and has served on Institute of Medicine planning committees, including the Planning Committee for Resources for Population Health Improvement: A Workshop. She received both her Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in Social Work from the University of Missouri.

Marthe R. Gold, M.D., M.P.H., is the Logan Professor in the Department of Community Health and Social Medicine at the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education at City College, New York. She is also a Visiting Scholar at the New York Academy of Medicine. Her current academic research focuses on patient, public, and decision-maker views on using economic and comparative effectiveness information to inform health policy. Dr. Gold’s clinical training is in family medicine and she has been a primary care provider in both urban and rural underserved settings. Her prior positions include senior policy adviser in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (1990 to 1996), where her focus was on the financing of clinical preventive services; the economics and outcomes of public health programs; and health care reform. Dr. Gold also directed the work of the U.S. Public Health Service’s Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine, an expert panel whose report remains an influential guide to cost-effectiveness methodology for academic and policy uses. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. She served as chair of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Public Health Strategies to Improve Health, which was convened in 2009, and whose three reports on measurement, law and policy, and funding were released between 2010 and 2012. Dr. Gold received her M.D. from the Tufts University School of Medicine and her M.P.H. from the Columbia School of Public Health.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

George Isham, M.D., M.S., is senior advisor to HealthPartners, responsible for working with the board of directors and the senior management team on health and quality of care improvement for patients, members, and the community. Dr. Isham is also senior fellow, HealthPartners Research Foundation and facilitates forward progress at the intersection of population health research and public policy. Dr. Isham is active nationally and currently co-chairs the National Quality Forum–convened Measurement Application Partnership; chairs the National Committee for Quality Assurance’s (NCQA’s) clinical program committee; and is a member of NCQA’s committee on performance measurement. Dr. Isham is chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Health Literacy and has chaired three studies in addition to serving on a number of Institute of Medicine (IOM) studies related to health and quality of care. In 2003 he was appointed as a lifetime national associate of the Academies in recognition of his contributions to the work of the IOM. He is a former member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Task Force on Community Preventive Services and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. He currently serves on the advisory committee to the director of CDC. His practice experience as a general internist was with the U.S. Navy, at the Freeport Clinic in Freeport, Illinois, and as a clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics in Madison, Wisconsin.

Megan Joseph, M.A., is the director of community organizing for the United Way of Santa Cruz County and a coach practitioner of Leadership for Community Transformation. She has more than 15 years of experience designing and implementing coalitions and collaboratives made up of multiple stakeholders to jointly act to address critical problems affecting the welfare of neighborhoods and communities. Based on careful data gathering, research, and strategic planning, these programs advocate for and implement policy and other significant changes to bring about lasting solutions to improve lives. Current projects include the Go For Health! Collaborative to reduce childhood obesity, the Criminal Justice Council’s Youth Violence Prevention strategic plan, the Community Corrections Partnership’s community education and engagement process and Proposition 47 outreach, the Smart Solutions to Homelessness Leadership Council working to end homelessness, and the Community Prevention Partners working to reduce youth access to alcohol and other drugs. Ms. Joseph has a B.A. in Criminology and Psychology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, a Master’s Degree in Consciousness and Transformative Studies from John F. Kennedy University, and a Master’s Degree in Criminology, Law and Society from the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

University of California, Irvine. She is also a certified trainer in Dialogue for Peaceful Change.

David A. Kindig, M.D., Ph.D., received a B.A. from Carleton College and an M.D. and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago School of Medicine. He completed residency training in Social Pediatrics at Montefiore Hospital. Dr. Kindig served as a professor of Preventive Medicine/Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin, where he developed a unique distance education graduate degree in medical management. He was vice chancellor for health sciences at the University of Wisconsin–Madison; director of Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center; deputy director of the Bureau of Health Manpower, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; and the first medical director of the National Health Services Corps. He was national president of the Student American Medical Association. He served as chair of the federal Council of Graduate Medical Education; president of the Association for Health Services Research; Prospective Payment Assessment Commission (ProPAC) Commissioner; and senior advisor to Donna Shalala, former Secretary of Health and Human Services. In 1996 he was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. He received the Distinguished Service Award, University of Chicago School of Medicine. He chaired the IOM Committee on Health Literacy in 2002-2004, chaired Wisconsin Governor Doyle’s Healthy Wisconsin Taskforce in 2006, and received the 2007 Wisconsin Public Health Association’s Distinguished Service to Public Health Award.

Abigail Kroch, Ph.D., M.P.H., earned her B.A. in Biology, with honors, at the University of Chicago. Dr. Kroch completed her Master’s in Public Health at the University of California (UC), Berkeley, concentrating on Epidemiology and researching the relationship of acculturation to nutrition and physical activity in school children. She received her Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University, studying the biophysics of protein oligomerization. She joined the lab of Keith Yamamoto at the UC San Francisco (UCSF) for her postdoctoral studies, and was awarded the Ruth L. Kirshstein National Research Service Fellowship Award to fund her work on nuclear receptor biology. She served as director of the Office of Postdoctoral Education in the Dean’s Office of the School of Medicine at UCSF. She led data collection and analysis efforts for two multimillion-dollar childhood obesity prevention programs in California at the Center for Weight and Health at UC Berkeley. She served as a California Epidemiology Intelligence Service Officer with the California Department of Public Health. She is now the director of epidemiology, planning, and evaluation for Contra Costa Health Services, Department of Public Health. Her work focuses on emerging health issues in the county, specifically on health inequities regarding

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

chronic and infectious disease. Additionally, she supervises and carries out analysis of medical claims data for the Contra Costa County Health Plan and the Contra Costa County Regional Medical Center.

Thomas LaVeist, Ph.D., earned a Bachelor’s Degree at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Michigan. He completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Health Policy at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Dr. LaVeist is a former Fellow at the Institute of Gerontology and School of Public Health at the University of Michigan, where he participated in several studies, including a study of differences in adjustment to aging in four societies (Japan, mainland China, Taiwan, and United States) and the National Survey of Black Americans. Dr. LaVeist is also a former associate with the Program for Research on Black Americans at the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan. As a Brookdale National Fellow, Dr. LaVeist’s work has focused on further understanding the social and behavioral factors that affect the length of human life. He has also conducted studies of social determinants of health, and research on determinants of disparities in health care access, use, and quality.

Katherine Froeb Papa, M.P.H., is the director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation–funded Public Health Systems Research (PHSR) project at AcademyHealth, which focuses on bridging the gap between public health and the health care system. The PHSR project seeks to build this new research discipline by supporting junior investigators, developing training opportunities for researchers, synthesizing research findings, and translating findings for policy makers. Ms. Papa’s extensive experience in public policy and public health research, evaluation, and communications includes her previous experience as director of the Adolescent and School Health Project at the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. In that capacity, she developed and promoted national policies and programs to improve child health and access to health care. She supported public health investments in youth related to the prevention of chronic diseases and sexually transmitted infections as well as the promotion of positive health behaviors. Her other relevant experience includes consulting with states on welfare reform policies and designing disease prevention and management campaigns for pharmaceutical companies and nonprofit organizations. Ms. Papa earned her M.P.H. and a certificate in Maternal and Child Health from Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health. Currently, as a volunteer for the Arlington County, Virginia, Department of Public Health, she co-chairs the Chronic Disease Prevention committee, which aims to reduce obesity and tobacco use in the county’s youth. Additionally, as a member of the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

board of the Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youth, Ms. Papa evaluates proposals to use Master Settlement Agreement Funds to prevent tobacco use among children in the Northern Virginia region.

Alonzo L. Plough, Ph.D., M.P.H., M.A., joined the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as vice president, research-evaluation-learning, and chief science officer in 2014. He leads the Foundation’s long-standing focus on building the evidence base to foster innovation in health services and systems and to improve population health. He is responsible for Foundation-wide organizational learning and the two program areas that support those activities, the global and pioneer teams. Dr. Plough came to the Foundation from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, where he served as director of emergency preparedness and response. In that role, he was responsible for the management of the public health preparedness activities protecting the 10 million residents of Los Angeles County from natural disasters and threats related to disease outbreaks and other public health emergencies. He coordinated activities in emergency operations, infectious disease control, risk communication, planning, and community engagement. Prior to this position, Dr. Plough served as vice president of strategy, planning, and evaluation for The California Endowment. He led the Endowment’s strategic planning and development, evaluation, research, and organizational learning activities. Dr. Plough also served 10 years as director and health officer for the Seattle and King County Department of Public Health, and professor of health services at the University of Washington School of Public Health in Seattle. He previously served as director of public health in Boston for 8 years. Dr. Plough earned his M.A. and Ph.D. at Cornell University and his M.P.H. at Yale University School of Medicine’s Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. He did his undergraduate work at St. Olaf College, where he earned a B.A. He has held academic appointments at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Tufts University Department of Community Medicine, and Boston University School of Management. He has been the recipient of numerous awards for public service and leadership and is the author of an extensive body of scholarly articles, books, and book chapters.

Brenda Sulick, Ph.D., M.A., is the policy outreach director, strategic initiatives at AARP Public Policy Institute. In addition to serving as the vice president of congressional affairs and advocacy at the National PACE Association, which represents 80 Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly, Dr. Sulick was the national recipient of the John Heinz Senate Fellowship in Aging in 2006-2007. She worked for former U.S. Senator Blanche Lincoln (D-AR), a member of the Finance Committee and Special

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

Committee on Aging. Previous positions include director of federal health policy at the Alzheimer’s Association and senior program specialist and consultant for AARP in Washington, DC. She has taught in a number of undergraduate and graduate courses on health care and economic security issues. Dr. Sulick holds a Ph.D. in Public Administration and Policy/Gerontology from Portland State University. She also holds a B.A. in Political Science and Public Administration from York College and an M.A. in Public Policy and Gerontology from the George Washington University.

Steven M. Teutsch, M.D., M.P.H., is an independent consultant, adjunct professor at the Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, and senior fellow, Schaeffer Center, University of Southern California. Until 2014 he was the chief science officer, Los Angeles County Public Health, where he continued his work on evidence-based public health and policy. He had been in the Outcomes Research and Management program at Merck since 1997, responsible for scientific leadership in developing evidence-based clinical management programs, conducting outcomes research studies, and improving outcomes measurement to enhance quality of care. Prior to joining Merck, he was director of the Division of Prevention Research and Analytic Methods (DPRAM) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he was responsible for assessing the effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of disease and injury prevention strategies. DPRAM developed comparable methodology for studies of the effectiveness and economic impact of prevention programs, provided training in these methods, developed CDC’s capacity for conducting necessary studies, and provided technical assistance for conducting economic and decision analysis. The Division also evaluated the impact of interventions in urban areas, developed the Guide to Community Preventive Services, and provided support for CDC’s analytic methods. He has served as a member of The Task Force and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which develops the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services. He has also been a member of America’s Health Information Community Personalized Health Care Workgroup and the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Prevention and Practice (EGAPP) Workgroup. He chaired the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics Health and Society. He has served on and chaired Institute of Medicine panels and Medicare’s Evidence Development and Coverage Advisory Committee, and served on several subcommittees of the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Healthy People 2020. When Dr. Teutsch joined CDC in 1977, he was assigned to the Parasitic Diseases Division and worked extensively on toxoplasmosis. He was then assigned to the Kidney Donor and subsequently the Kidney Disease Program. He developed the framework for CDC’s diabetes control program. He joined the Epidemiology

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

Program Office and became director of the Division of Surveillance and Epidemiology, where he was responsible for coordinating CDC’s disease monitoring activities. He became chief of the Prevention Effectiveness Activity in 1992. Dr. Teutsch received his undergraduate degree in Biochemical Sciences at Harvard University, an M.P.H. in Epidemiology from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health, and his M.D. from Duke University School of Medicine. He completed his residency training in Internal Medicine at Pennsylvania State University, Hershey. He was certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Preventive Medicine, and is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Teutsch has published more than 200 articles and 8 books in a broad range of fields in epidemiology, including parasitic diseases, diabetes, technology assessment, health services research, and surveillance.

Sarah Treuhaft, M.A., is director of equitable growth initiatives at PolicyLink, a national research and action institute advancing economic and social equity. She coordinates the organization’s work on demographic change and the economy, collaborating with local and national partners on research and action projects that aim to build a more equitable economy. She leads the All-In Cities initiative as well as the research partnership between PolicyLink and the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity at the University of Southern California, which maintains the National Equity Atlas data and policy tool. Ms. Treuhaft has been interviewed and cited for her research in local and national media outlets, including The Washington Post, National Journal, Next City, and Sacramento Bee. She holds an M.A. in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley.

Matthew Trowbridge, M.D., is a physician, public health researcher, and associate professor at the University of Virginia (UVA) School of Medicine. Dr. Trowbridge’s academic research focuses on the impact of architecture, urban design, and transportation planning on public health. Dr. Trowbridge leads the Green Health Partnership between the U.S. Green Building Council and the UVA School of Medicine. The partnership is supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and focused on leveraging green building market transformation tools to promote public health. Previously, Dr. Trowbridge was a senior advisor to the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research on built environment and childhood obesity prevention. He also served 3 years as a senior advisor on built environment and childhood obesity prevention research at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Trowbridge is board certified in both general pediatrics and preventive medicine and obtained his medical and public health training at Emory University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

Julie Willems Van Dijk, Ph.D., M.S.N., is an associate scientist and the co-director of the County Health Rankings and Roadmaps Program, a collaboration between the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin (UW) Population Health Institute. Her research focuses on community health improvement planning processes. Prior to joining the Population Health Institute, she worked in local public health for 21 years as a public health nurse, director of nursing, and a health officer. She has served on numerous community boards, including the Aspirus Wausau Hospital Board of Directors, the Wausau School District Board of Education, the Wausau Child Care Board of Directors, the Marathon County United Way’s Local Initiatives for Excellence (LIFE) committee, and the Wausau/Marathon County Chamber of Commerce Leadership Wausau program. She received a Doctorate Degree in Nursing with an emphasis in Public Health Leadership from UW–Milwaukee. She also holds an M.S.N. from UW–Oshkosh and a B.S.N. from UW–Eau Claire. She is a graduate of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Executive Fellows program and the National Public Health Leadership Institute.

Steven Woolf, M.D., M.P.H., has served as director of the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Center on Society and Health (formerly the VCU Center on Human Needs) since he established it in 2007. He is also professor of family medicine and population health at VCU. He has published more than 150 articles in a career that has focused on evidence-based medicine and the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines, with a special focus on preventive medicine, cancer screening, quality improvement, and social justice. His studies demonstrate that addressing poverty, education, and the causes of racial and ethnic disparities could accomplish far more to improve the health of Americans than investing predominantly in medical technological advances. In addition to scientific publications, he has tried to bring this message to policy makers and to the public through testimony in Congress, editorials in major newspapers, Web-based tools, and speeches.

Kelly Worden, M.P.H., is a public health researcher at the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). Her work aims to propel action-oriented research on the intersection between the built environment and public health. Worden manages activities related to the Green Health Partnership between USGBC and the University of Virginia School of Medicine. She received an M.P.H. with a focus on Global Environmental Health from The George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. She earned a B.S. in Human Biology from The University of Texas at Austin. Prior to joining USGBC, Ms. Worden supported global advocacy and communications efforts at the World Heart Federation in Geneva, Switzerland.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
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In times of rapid change and constrained resources, measures that are important, focused, and reliable are vital. However there is an overabundance of measures available for evaluating various aspects of population health and previous efforts to simplify existing sets to meet the needs of all decision makers have been unsuccessful. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to explore the status and uses of measures and measurement in the work of improving population health. Participants explored existing and emerging population health metric sets and characteristics of metrics necessary for stakeholder action across multiple sectors. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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