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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
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Appendix A

References

AARP. 2015. Livability index. https://livabilityindex.aarp.org (accessed July 13, 2016).

Berwick, D. M., T. W. Nolan, and J. Whittington. 2008. The triple aim: Care, health, and cost. Health Affairs 27(3):759-769.

Brown, J., D. Isaacs, and World Café Community. 2005. The world café: Shaping our futures through conversations that matter. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

Cingano, F. 2014. Trends in income inequality and its impact on economic growth. OECD Social, Employment, and Migration Working Papers No. 163. Paris, France: OECD Publishing.

Dabla-Norris, E., K. Kochhar, N. Suphaphiphat, F. Ricka, and E. Tsounta. 2015. Causes and consequences of income inequality: A global perspective. Washington, DC: International Monetary Fund.

Evans, B. F., E. Zimmerman, S. H. Woolf, and A. D. Haley. 2012. Neighborhood characteristics and health in Baltimore, Maryland: Technical report. Richmond, VA: Virginia Commonwealth University.

Harper, S., J. Lynch, S. C. Meersman, N. Breen, W. W. Davis, and M. E. Reichman. 2008. An overview of methods for monitoring social disparities in cancer with an example using trends in lung cancer incidence by area–socioeconomic position and race–ethnicity, 1992-2004. American Journal of Epidemiology 167(8):889-899.

Harper, S., J. Lynch, S. C. Meersman, N. Breen, W. W. Davis, and M. C. Reichman. 2009. Trends in area–socioeconomic and race–ethnic disparities in breast cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, screening, mortality, and survival among women ages 50 years and over (1987-2005). Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention 18(1):121-131.

Harper, S., N. B. King, S. C. Meersman, M. E. Reichman, N. Breen, and J. Lynch. 2010. Implicit value judgments in the measurement of health inequalities. Milbank Quarterly 88(1):4-29.

Healthways. 2015. Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index. http://www.well-beingindex.com (accessed July 13, 2016).

Helliwell, J. F., R. Layard, and J. Sachs. 2015. World happiness report 2015. New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
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Herrin, J., J. St. Andre, K. Kenward, M. S. Joshi, A. M. Audet, and S. C. Hines. 2015. Community factors and hospital readmission rates. Health Services Research 50(1):20-39.

IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2009. State of the USA health indicators: Letter report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

IOM. 2012a. For the public’s health: Investing in a healthier future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

IOM. 2012b. Toward quality measures for population health and the leading health indicators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

IOM. 2014. Capturing social and behavioral domains and measures in electronic health records: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

IOM. 2015. Vital signs: Core metrics for health and health care progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Jacobson, D. M., and S. Teutsch. 2012. An environmental scan of integrated approaches for defining and measure total population health by the clinical care system, the government public health system, and stakeholder organizations. Paper commissioned by the National Quality Forum, Washington, DC.

LaVeist, T. A., D. J. Gaskin, and P. Richard. 2009. The economic burden of health inequalities in the United States. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies.

Lee, L. M., S. M. Teutsch, S. B. Thacker, and M. E. St. Louis. 2010. Principles and practice of public health surveillance, 3rd ed. New York: Oxford.

McMillan, D. W., and D. M. Chavis. 1986. Sense of community: A definition and theory. Journal of Community Psychology 14(1):6-23.

NCI (National Cancer Institute). 2013. Health disparities calculator (hd*calc). http://seer.cancer.gov/hdcalc (accessed July 13, 2016).

NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse). 2015. Monitoring the future results. https://www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/trends-statistics/monitoring-future (accessed July 13, 2016).

NQF (National Quality Forum). 2014. Risk adjustment for socioeconomic status or other sociodemographic factors: Technical report. Washington, DC: National Quality Forum.

Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2015. Leading health indicators. http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/Leading-Health-Indicators (accessed July 13, 2016).

Office of Justice Programs. 2015. Census of state and local law enforcement agencies. http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=dcdetail&iid=249 (accessed July 13, 2016).

PolicyLink. 2014. National equity atlas. http://nationalequityatlas.org (accessed July 13, 2016).

PolicyLink. 2015. National equity atlas. http://nationalequityatlas.org (accessed July 13, 2016).

RAND. 2015. American life panel. https://alpdata.rand.org (accessed July 13, 2016).

Ross, C. E., R. K. Masters, and R. A. Hummer. 2012. Education and the gender gaps in health and mortality. Demography 49(4):1157-1183.

Ruggles, S., K. Genadek, R. Goeken, J. Grover, and M. Sobek. 2015. Integrated public use micro-data series: Version 6.0 [Machine-readable database]. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota. https://usa.ipums.org/usa (accessed September 14, 2016).

Satcher, D., G. E. Fryer, Jr., J. McCann, A. Troutman, S. H. Woolf, and G. Rust. 2005. What if we were equal? A comparison of the black–white mortality gap in 1960 and 2000. Health Affairs 24(2):459-464.

Tavernise, S., and A. Sun. 2015. Same city, but very different life spans. http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/04/29/health/life-expectancy-nyc-chi-atl-richmond.html (accessed July 13, 2016).

Thacker, S. B., J. R. Qualters, and L. M. Lee. 2012. Public health surveillance in the United States: Evolution and challenges. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 61(3):3-9.

Think Health LA. 2015. Think Health LA. http://www.thinkhealthla.org (accessed August 2, 2016).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

Treuhaft, S., A. G. Blackwell, and M. Pastor. 2011. America’s tomorrow: Equity is the superior growth model. Oakland, CA: PolicyLink.

United Health Foundation. 2015. America’s healthrankings. http://www.americashealthrankings.org (accessed August 5, 2016).

University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. 2014. County health rankings & roadmaps: Our approach. http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/Our-Approach (accessed July 13, 2016).

University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. 2015. County health rankings & roadmaps. http://www.countyhealthrankings.org (accessed August 5, 2016).

U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. 2003. Health, United States, 2003. Hyattsville, MD: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics.

U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. 2011. National vital statistics report. Hyattsville, MD: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics.

WHO (World Health Organization). 2010. A conceptual framework for action on the social determinants of health. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO.

Woolf, S. H., R. E. Johnson, R. L. Phillips, Jr., and M. Philipsen. 2007. Giving everyone the health of the educated: An examination of whether social change would save more lives than medical advances. American Journal of Public Health 97(4):679-683.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
Page 104
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
Page 106
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In times of rapid change and constrained resources, measures that are important, focused, and reliable are vital. However there is an overabundance of measures available for evaluating various aspects of population health and previous efforts to simplify existing sets to meet the needs of all decision makers have been unsuccessful. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to explore the status and uses of measures and measurement in the work of improving population health. Participants explored existing and emerging population health metric sets and characteristics of metrics necessary for stakeholder action across multiple sectors. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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