National Academies Press: OpenBook

Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Workshop Agenda

« Previous: Appendix A: References
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

Appendix B

Workshop Agenda

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE
ROUNDTABLE ON POPULATION HEALTH IMPROVEMENT
METRICS THAT MATTER FOR POPULATION
HEALTH ACTION: A WORKSHOP

July 30, 2015

OPEN SESSION

The California Endowment Conference Center,
1111 Broadway, 7th Floor, Oakland, CA

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:

  1. Highlight existing and emerging population health metrics sets and explore their purposes, areas of overlap, and gaps.
  2. Highlight population health metrics with attention to equity/disparities.
  3. Discuss characteristics of metrics necessary for stakeholder action.
  4. Highlight population health metrics useful to addressing health beyond health care and engaging total population.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

8:15 a.m.

Welcome and overview of the day

David Kindig, professor emeritus of population health sciences, emeritus vice chancellor for health sciences, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health; co-chair, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement

8:25 a.m.

The metrics landscape

Context setting: Steven Teutsch, senior scholar, Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics, University of Southern California; senior fellow, Public Health Institute; and adjunct professor, University of California, Los Angeles, Fielding School of Public Health

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health: Alonzo Plough, vice president, Research-Evaluation-Learning, and chief science officer, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Multisectoral metrics: Rajiv Bhatia, executive director, The Civic Engine

9:25 a.m. Q&A/Discussion
9:45 a.m. Break
10:00 a.m.

Using metrics locally

Moderator: Julie Willems Van Dijk, associate scientist, co-director of the County Health Rankings and Roadmaps Program, University of Wisconsin

Community example: Megan Joseph, director of community organizing, United Way of Santa Cruz County, California

Health system example: Michael Bilton, senior director, Community Health and Benefit Dignity Health

10:45 a.m. Q&A/Discussion
11:05 a.m.

Measurement and health equity

Moderator: Steven Woolf, director, Center on Society and Health, and professor of family medicine and population health, Virginia Commonwealth University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×

Landscape, challenges, debates: Thomas LaVeist, professor and director, Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins University

PolicyLink’s National Equity Atlas: Sarah Treuhaft, director of equitable growth initiatives, PolicyLink

11:50 a.m. Q&A/Discussion
12:15 p.m.

Lunch and metrics demos/Mini-poster session

AARP Livability Index: Brenda Sulick, policy outreach director, strategic initiatives, AARP Public Policy Institute

PolicyLink’s National Equity Atlas: Sarah Treuhaft, director of equitable growth initiatives, PolicyLink

Contra Costa County climate change metrics: Abigail Kroch, director of the Epidemiology, Planning & Evaluation unit of Contra Costa Health Services

Live Well San Diego measures: Dale Fleming, director of strategy and innovation; San Diego Public Health; and Dan Gallagher, senior regional planner, San Diego Association of Governments

1:45 p.m.

World Café session (2 questions, 2 rounds)

Hosts: Alina Baciu, Institute of Medicine; Amy Geller, Institute of Medicine; Mary Lou Goeke, United Way of Santa Cruz County; Marthe Gold, New York Academy of Medicine; Lyla Hernandez, Institute of Medicine; Kate Papa, AcademyHealth; Steven M. Smith, University of Florida; Brenda Sulick, AARP; Darla Thompson, Institute of Medicine; Matthew Trowbridge, University of Virginia; Julie Willems Van Dijk, University of Wisconsin; Kelly Worden, U.S. Green Building Council

Question 1: What kinds of measures are helpful to communities working to improve health? (two rounds of discussion)

Question 2: What are barriers in your community to using measures to inform action? (two rounds of discussion)

3:15 p.m. Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
3:30 p.m.

Report back

Moderator: Steven Teutsch, senior scholar, Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics, University of Southern California; senior fellow, Public Health Institute; and adjunct professor, University of California, Los Angeles, Fielding School of Public Health

4:30 p.m.

Reflections on the day

George Isham, senior advisor, HealthPartners; senior fellow, HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research; co-chair, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement

5:00 p.m. Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
Page 109
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21899.
×
Page 110
Next: Appendix C: Speaker, Moderator, and Invited Guest Biographical Sketches »
Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $50.00 Buy Ebook | $39.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

In times of rapid change and constrained resources, measures that are important, focused, and reliable are vital. However there is an overabundance of measures available for evaluating various aspects of population health and previous efforts to simplify existing sets to meet the needs of all decision makers have been unsuccessful. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to explore the status and uses of measures and measurement in the work of improving population health. Participants explored existing and emerging population health metric sets and characteristics of metrics necessary for stakeholder action across multiple sectors. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!