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Page 191
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Resources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Page 192
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Resources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Page 193
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Resources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Page 194
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Resources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Page 194

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191 U.S. DOT The United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) is a department of the federal government. Each state also has its own department of transportation. The U.S. DOT is responsible for administration of federal transportation programs dealing with public transportation, highways, railroads, air transportation, and maritime transporta- tion. The department’s mission is to serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life of the American people, today and into the future. —http://www.dot.gov/ More information about how the U.S. DOT can help tribes start or enhance a transit program is available by clicking on the link to “Resources for Tribes and Tribal Governments,” which takes you to the following webpage: http://www.dot.gov/tribal. TTAP Centers The Tribal Technical Assistance Program (TTAP) is a training and technology transfer resource for Native American tribes in the United States. The TTAP’s main aim is to give “technical assis- tance and training activities at the tribal level, help implement administrative procedures and new transportation technology, provide training and assistance in transportation planning and economic development, and develop educational programs to encourage and motivate inter- est in transportation careers among Native American students.” This resource is funded by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The seven TTAP Centers and their service areas are as follows: Alaska TTAP University of Alaska, Fairbanks Interior—Aleutian Campus P.O. Box 756720 Fairbanks, AK 99775-6720 (907) 474-1580 http://www.uaf.edu/akttap Service area: Alaska California/Nevada TTAP National Indian Justice Center 5250 Aero Drive A p p e n d i x B Resources

192 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook Santa Rosa, CA 95403 (707) 579-5507 or (800) 966-0662 http://www.nijc.org/ttap.html Service area: California, Nevada Colorado TTAP Colorado State University College of Business 1270 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523-1270 (800) 262-7623 http://ttap.colostate.edu/ Service area: Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah Michigan TTAP Michigan Technological University 301-E Dillman Hall 1400 Townsend Drive Houghton, MI 49931-1295 (888) 230-0688 http://www.ttap.mtu.edu/ Service area: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin Northern Plains TTAP United Tribes Technical College 3315 University Drive Bismarck, ND 58504 (701) 255-3285 ext. 1262 http://www.uttc.edu/forum/ttap/ttap.asp Service area: Montana (eastern), Nebraska (northern), North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming Northwest TTAP Eastern Washington University Department of Urban Planning Public & Health Administration 216 Isle Hall Cheney, WA 99004 (800) 583-3187 http://www.ewu.edu/TTAP/ Service area: Idaho, Montana (western), Oregon, Washington Oklahoma TTAP Oklahoma State University 5202 North Richmond Hills Road Stillwater, OK 74078-0001 (405) 744-6049 (405) 744-7268 http://ttap.okstate.edu/ Service area: Kansas, Nebraska (southern), Oklahoma, Texas

Resources 193 State Transit Associations State transit associations represent the transit systems in most states. These associations pro- mote legislation beneficial to public transit, advocate for capital and operating funds, and promote awareness and support for public transit in the state they represent. These associations hold transit conferences that provide presentations on topics of interest, updates on federal and state funding, training sessions, and displays of equipment and information. Many of these associations also publish newsletters focusing on current events in public transportation. Many of the following state transit associations provide information and resources online: • Alaska Mobility Coalition: http://www.alaskamobility.org/ • Arizona Transit Association (AzTA): http://www.azta.org/ • California Association for Coordinated Transportation (CalACT): http://www.calact.org/ • California Transit Association: http://www.caltransit.org/ • Colorado Association of Transit Agencies (CASTA): http://www.coloradotransit.com/ • Community Transportation Association of Idaho (CTAI): http://ctai.org/ • Connecticut Association for Community Transportation (CACT): http://www.cact.info/ • Dakota Transit Association (DTA)—This association serves both North and South Dakota: http://www.dakotatransit.org/ • Florida Public Transportation Association (FPTA): http://www.floridatransit.org/ • Indiana Transportation Association (ITA): http://www.indianatransportationassociation.com/ • Iowa Public Transit Association (IPTA): http://www.iapublictransit.com/ • Kansas Public Transit Association (KPTA): http://kstransit.org/ • Louisiana Public Transit Association (LPTA): No website • Maine Transit Association (MTA): No website • Michigan Public Transit Association (MPTA): http://www.mptaonline.org/ • Minnesota Public Transit Association (MPTA): http://www.mpta-transit.org/ • Mississippi Public Transit Association (MPTA): http://www.mspublictransit.org/ • Montana Transit Association (MTA): http://www.mttransit.org/ • Nebraska Association of Transportation Providers (NATP): http://www.neatp.org/ • New Mexico Passenger Transportation Association (NMPTA): http://www.nmpta.com/ • New York Public Transit Association (NYPTA): http://www.nytransit.org/ • North Carolina Public Transportation Association (NCPTA): http://www.nctransit.org/ • Oklahoma Transit Association (OTA): http://www.oktransit.org/ • Oregon Transit Association (OTA): http://www.oregontransit.com/ • South West Transit Association (SWTA): http://www.swta.org/ • Texas Transit Association (TTA): http://www.texastransit.org/ • Transportation Association of South Carolina (TASC): http://www.go-tasc.org/ • Utah Urban and Rural Specialized Transportation Association (URSTA): http://www.ursta.org/ • Washington State Transit Association (WSTA): http://www.watransit.com/ • Wisconsin Urban & Rural Transit Association (WURTA): http://wisconsintransit.com/wurta/ • Wyoming Public Transit Association (WYTRANS): http://www.wytrans.org/ Community Transportation Association of America Tribal Passenger Transportation Technical Assistance Program This CTAA program is designed to help Native American tribes enhance economic growth and development by improving transportation ser- vices. Technical assistance is limited to planning and may support transit service improvements and expansion, system start-up, facility development, development of marketing plans and materials, trans- portation coordination, training and other public transit problem solving activities.

194 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook The CTAA website provides links to the following resources helpful in applying for both long- term and short-term assistance: • Technical Assistance for Rural and Tribal Communities: http://web1.ctaa.org/webmodules/ webarticles/anmviewer.asp?a=49 • Tribal Passenger Transportation Technical Assistance Program (long-term): http://web1. ctaa.org/webmodules/webarticles/articlefiles/M-TTAPP12.pdf • Rural Passenger Transportation Technical Assistance Program (long term): http://web1.ctaa. org/webmodules/webarticles/articlefiles/M-RPTAPP12.pdf • USDA Tribal Transit Technical Assistance Program (short term): http://web1.ctaa.org/web modules/webarticles/anmviewer.asp?a=561&z=5 National Rural Transit Assistance Program The National Rural Transit Assistance Program (National RTAP) is a program of the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) dedicated to creating rural and tribal transit solutions through technical assistance, partner collaboration, peer-to-peer assistance, technology tools, free train- ing materials, and other transit industry products. Tribes are encouraged to access all of the free National RTAP best practices, reports, training videos, workbooks, surveys, and direct one- on-one technical assistance through the resource center, www.nationalrtap.org, or by calling toll-free, (888) 589-6821. Transit Cooperative Research Program Reports The Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) is a program of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) of the National Academies. TCRP carries out research that is useful for public transportation systems. TCRP is funded through the FTA. It is governed by an indepen- dent board—the TCRP Oversight and Project Selection (TOPS) Committee. The TOPS Com- mittee sets priorities to decide what research studies will be undertaken. A number of TCRP publications have been referenced in this guidebook. All TCRP publications may be found online at the following webpage: http://www.tcrponline.org/. University Transportation Centers The federal government funds research centers at various universities throughout the country. The following two centers focus on transportation issues in rural areas: Small Urban and Rural Transit Center (SURTC) University of North Dakota Fargo, North Dakota www.surtc.org Western Transportation Institute (WTI) Montana State University Bozeman, Montana www.wti.montana.edu

Next: Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources »
Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook Get This Book
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TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 154: Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook offers guidance about the various steps for planning and implementing a tribal transit system. The steps that are described may be used for planning a new transit system, enhancing an existing service, or taking action to sustain services.

The report also provides an overview of the tribal transit planning process.

The project that developed TCRP Report 154 also produced TCRP Web Document 54: Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: Final Research Report, which documents the development of the TCRP Report 154.

In addition, the project also produced a 16-page full-color brochure, published in 2011 as "Native Americans on the Move: Challenges and Successes", with an accompanying PowerPoint presentation; and a PowerPoint presentation describing the entire project.

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