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Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook (2012)

Chapter: Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Potential Funding Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22818.
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195 Potential Funding Sources U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Grant Programs Major Capital Investment Program (Section 5309) Program Purpose: The Fixed Major Capital Investment Program provides capital assistance for • new and replacement buses and facilities; • modernization of existing rail systems; and • new fixed guideway systems. A “fixed guideway” is defined as any transit service that uses exclusive or controlled rights- of-way or rails, entirely or in part. This includes motor bus service operated on exclusive or controlled rights-of-way and high-occupancy-vehicle (HOV) lanes. It also includes heavy rail, commuter rail, light rail, monorail, trolleybus, aerial tramway, inclined plane, cable car, auto- mated guideway transit, and ferryboat systems. While tribes are unlikely to be eligible for the fixed guideway funding, all would be eligible for the Bus and Bus-Related Equipment and Facilities program (bus program) which provides capital assistance for new and replacement buses, related equipment, and facilities. It is a discre- tionary program to supplement formula funding in both urbanized and rural areas. Program Eligibility: Eligible applicants are public bodies and agencies such as transit authori- ties; states, municipalities, and other political subdivisions of states; public agencies and instru- mentalities of one or more states; and public corporations, boards and commissions established by states. Private companies providing public transportation may also be eligible for certain activities. Under the fixed guideway program, eligible projects modernize or improve the fixed guide- way system. These include • Preventive maintenance • Passenger stations and terminals • System extensions • Security equipment and systems • Maintenance facilities and equipment • Purchase and rehabilitation of rolling stock, track, line equipment, structures, signals and communications, power equipment, and substations • Operational support equipment including computer hardware and software A p p e n d i x C Potential Funding Sources Major Capital Investment Program (Section 5309) Federal Participation: 80% Program Funding: $1,646,693,725 (FY10) Distribution Method: Statutory Formula and Discretionary Grants Regulatory Reference: 49 U.S.C. 5309 Administering Agency: U.S. DOT—FTA Local Match: Must come from local sources or non-federal sources.

196 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook Under the bus program, eligible activities include • Purchasing of buses for fleet and service expansion • Bus maintenance and administrative facilities • Transfer facilities • Transportation centers • Intermodal terminals • Park-and-ride stations • Acquisition of replacement vehicles • Bus rebuilds • Bus preventive maintenance • Passenger amenities such as passenger shelters and bus stop signs • Accessory and miscellaneous equipment such as mobile radio units • Supervisory vehicles • Fare boxes • Computers • Shop and garage equipment Program Contact: Office of Program Management, Federal Transit Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, East Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-2053. http://www.fta.dot.gov/funding/grants/grants_financing_3558.html FTA Circular: FTA C 9300.1B. http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/Final_C_9300_1_Bpub.pdf Job Access and Reverse Commute Formula Program (Section 5316) Program Purpose: The purpose of the Job Access and Reverse Commute Program is to con- nect welfare recipients and low-income persons to employment and support services. This is achieved with grants to local governments, nonprofit organizations, and designated recipients of federal transit funding. Program Eligibility: Job Access grants finance the planning, capital, and operating cost of eli- gible transit projects. Reverse Commute grants finance reverse commute bus, train, and carpool services from urban, rural, and suburban locations to suburban work places. Eligible activities include • delivery of job access and reverse commute services, and • administration, planning, and provision of technical assistance. Eligible applicants are state and local government agencies, nonprofit agencies, and transit providers. Other: (1) A funded project must be a product of a local Public Transit–Human Services Plan and listed in the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) prior to grant award. (2) To access funds, the recipient must execute a grant agreement with the FTA. (3) Other federal funds may be used for local match, such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF). (3) Sixty percent of funds must be distributed among recipients in urbanized areas with popula- tions of 200,000 or more in the ratio that bears to the number of recipients in all urbanized areas. (4) Twenty percent of funds must be distributed to states in the ratio that the number of eligible low-income individuals and welfare recipients in urbanized areas (with populations of less than 200,000) in each state bears to the number in all urbanized areas. Job Access and Reverse Commute Program (Section 5316) Federal Participation: • 80% (Capital Projects) • 50% (Operating Assistance) Program Funding: $176,998,937 (FY10) Distribution Method: Project Grant Regulatory References: SAFETEA-LU Section 5316; 49 U.S.C. 5317 Administering Agency: U.S. DOT—FTA Local Match: Must come from local sources or non-FTA sources. Match- ing funds may be available from FHWA, HHS, DOL, and HUD funds.

potential Funding Sources 197 (5) Twenty percent of funds must be distributed to states in the ratio that the number of eligible low-income individuals and welfare recipients (in other than urbanized areas) in each state bears to the number in all other than urbanized areas. Program Contacts: Office of Transit Programs, FTA, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-2053. http://www.fta.dot.gov/ funding/grants/grants_financing_3550.html FTA Circular: FTA C 9050.1. http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/FTA_C_9050.1_JARC.pdf New Freedom Program (Section 5317) Program Purpose: The purpose of the New Freedom Program is to assist disabled individuals with transportation to and from jobs and employment. Grants are awarded for public transpor- tation services beyond those required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Program Eligibility: To be eligible, a project must be a new or alternative public transporta- tion service above and beyond the requirements for complementary paratransit service required by the ADA. Features of eligible projects include the following: • The project must assist the disabled with transportation to and from jobs and employment support services. • Both capital and operating expenses are eligible for funding. • Ten percent of program funds may be used for program administration, planning, and tech- nical assistance. Other: (1) An eligible recipient is designated by the governor of the state in consultation with local of- ficials and local public transportation providers in urbanized areas with populations above 200,000. (2) The state is the eligible recipient in urbanized areas between 50,000 and 200,000 population and in non-urbanized (rural) areas. (3) Public agencies, nonprofit agencies, public transportation providers, private transportation providers, and human services transportation providers are eligible grant subrecipients. (4) State funding is apportioned by formula, as follows: (a) Sixty percent is apportioned for areas of 200,000 or more in population in the ratio that the number of individuals with disabilities in each urbanized area bears to the number in all urbanized areas. (b) Twenty percent is apportioned among states in the ratio that the number of individuals with disabilities in urbanized areas (with population of less than 200,000) in each state bears to the number in all states. (c) Twenty percent is apportioned among states in the ratio that the number of individuals with disabilities (in other than urbanized areas) in each state bears to the number in all states. (5) Submission of the FTA application and a resolution by the authorized public body approv- ing the filing of the application is required. (6) Applications must include information on legal capacity, coordinated regional planning, and compliance with FTA certifications and assurances. (7) Funded programs and projects must be included in a local Public Transit–Human Service Plan, the area’s Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), and in the STIP. Program Contact: Office of Transit Programs, Federal Transit Administration, U.S. Depart- ment of Transportation, East Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-2053. http://www.fta.dot.gov/funding/grants/grants_financing_3549.html New Freedom Program (Section 5317) Federal Participation: • 80% (Capital Expenses) • 50% (Operating Assistance) • 90% (ADA- and Clean Air Act-compliant Vehicle Equipment) • 100% (Planning, Administration, Technical Assistance) Program Funding: $98,987,665 (FY10) Distribution Method: Formula Grant to States Regulatory References: SAFETEA-LU Section 5317; 49 U.S.C. 5317 Administering Agency: U.S. DOT—FTA Local Match: Must come from local sources or non-FTA sources. Match- ing funds may be avail- able from FHWA, HHS, DOL, and HUD funds.

198 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook FTA Circular: FTA C 9045.1. http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/FTA_C_9045.1_New_Free dom.pdf Over-the-Road Bus Program Program Purpose: The Over-the-Road Bus Program supports intercity fixed-route services and commuter, charter, and tour bus services. The purpose is to assist bus operators to comply with Transportation for Individuals with Disabilities regulations (49 CFR Part 37, Subpart H). Project Eligibility: Private operators of over-the-road buses are eligible. These operators use buses for intercity, fixed-route, and over-the-road service. They are also operators of local com- muter, charter, and tour services. Projects that finance 49 CFR Part 37 capital and training costs are eligible. This includes lifts, tie-downs, moveable seats, and doors associated with accessibility for persons with disabilities. Retrofitting vehicles is also an eligible expense. Eligible training costs include developing train- ing materials or providing training for local providers of over-the-road bus services. The federal share may not exceed 90 percent of the project costs. Program Contact: Office of Program Management, Federal Transit Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, East Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366–2053. http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-01-15/pdf/2010-703.pdf and http://www.fta.dot.gov/funding/grants/grants_financing_11856.html Federal Register: Over-the-Road Bus Accessibility Program Grants—75 FR 2583. http:// edocket.access.gpo.gov/2010/pdf/2010-703.pdf Over-the-Road Bus Accessibility Program Grants: Corrections—75 FR 20034. http://edocket. access.gpo.gov/2010/pdf/2010-8963.pdf Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program—Tribal Transit Program (Section 5311[c]) Program Purpose: The Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program—Tribal Transit Program supports tribal public transportation in rural areas. Program Eligibility: Federally recognized tribes or Alaskan native villages, groups, or com- munities are eligible for program funds. A tribe that is not federally recognized may apply to the state for funds as a subrecipient under the state apportionment of the Section 5311 program. Program funds may be used for capital, operating, planning, and administrative expenses for public transit projects that meet the needs of rural tribal communities. Eligible activities include • Capital projects • Operating costs of equipment and facilities for use in public transportation • Acquisition of services, including service agreements with private providers of transportation services Other: (1) The Tribal Transit Program is funded as a takedown under the larger FTA Section 5311 program. (2) There is no local match requirement. Program Contact: Office of Program Management, Federal Transit Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, East Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-2053. http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/E9-6271.htm and http://www07. grants.gov/search/search.do;jsessionid=r2HLMk4KlvW2HphGCF3CrKQyyvbqR5vTCgZJ2G2 Z4hgCCJQ3PyG7!1838295238?oppId=45903&mode=VIEW Over-the-Road Bus Program Federal Participation: 90% Program Funding: $8,800,000 (FY09) Distribution Method: Discretionary Grant (Competitive) Regulatory Reference: Section 3038 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century; Pub. L. 105-85 as amended by Pub. L. 109-059 Administering Agencies: U.S. DOT—FTA Local Match: Must come from private operators. Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program—Tribal Transit Program (Section 5311[c]) Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $17,000,000 (FY09) Distribution Method: Discretionary Grant (Competitive) Regulatory Reference: 49 U.S.C. 5311 Administering Agencies: U.S. DOT—FTA Local Match: Not needed.

potential Funding Sources 199 Federal Register: Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program—71 FR 46959. http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2006/pdf/06-6911.pdf Rural and Small Urban Areas Program (FTA Section 5311) Program Purpose: The purpose of the Rural and Small Urban Areas Program is to (a) improve, initiate, or continue public transportation service in rural and small areas under 50,000 population and (b) provide technical assistance for rural transportation providers. The goal is to • enhance access in non-urbanized areas to health care, shopping, education, employment, public services, and recreation; • assist in the maintenance, development, improvement, and use of public transportation systems in rural and small urban areas; • encourage coordination of programs and services to ensure the most efficient use of all federal funds for passenger transportation in non-urbanized areas; • assist in the development of intercity bus transportation; and • involve private transportation providers to the maximum extent feasible. Program Eligibility: Funds may be used for capital, operating, and project administration. State agencies, local public bodies, and nonprofit organizations, including tribal governments and tribal operators of transportation services, are eligible. Other: (1) State apportionments are based on a statutory formula with 20 percent allocated by the ratio of non-urbanized land area of each state to the non-urbanized land area of all states, with no state receiving more than five percent of funds. (2) A state agency must be designated by the governor to administer the program. (3) Funded projects must be listed in the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). (4) Compliance with the FTA annual list of certifications and assurances is required. (5) States must spend 15 percent of funds to support rural intercity bus service unless the gov- ernor certifies service is adequately met. (6) Other federal funds may be used for half of local match. Income from purchase-of-service contracts with human service agencies may be used for the entire local share for operating assistance. Program Contact: Office of Resource Management and State Programs, Federal Transit Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, East Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-2053. http://www.fta.dot.gov/funding/grants/grants_ financing_3555.html FTA Circular: FTA C 9040.1F. http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/FTA_C_9040.1F.pdf Transportation for Elderly Persons and Persons with Disabilities Program (Section 5310) Program Purpose: The purpose of the Transportation for Elderly Persons and Persons with Disabilities Program is to accommodate the mobility needs of the elderly and disabled where public transportation services are unavailable, insufficient, or inappropriate. The program is designed to supplement other FTA capital assistance programs by funding projects in all areas (urbanized, small urban, and rural). Funds are apportioned based on each state’s share of elderly and disabled populations. Program Eligibility: Program funds may be used for • Purchase and refurbishment of wheelchair-accessible vehicles • Communications equipment • Passenger bus shelters Rural and Small Urban Areas Program (Section 5311) Federal Participation: • 50% (Operating Assistance) • 80% (Capital and Project Administration) • 90% (Capital and Project Administra- tion for projects compliant with ADA and CAAA or bicycle access projects) Program Funding: $511,324,149 (FY10) Distribution Method: Formula Grant to States Regulatory Reference: 49 U.S.C. 5311 Administering Agency: U.S. DOT—FTA Local Match: Must come from local sources or non-FTA sources. Match- ing funds may be avail- able from FHWA, HHS, DOL, and HUD funds.

200 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook • Dispatch and data systems and computers • Acquisition of transportation services under contract, lease, or other arrangement Projects must provide the maximum feasible coordination of transportation services and the maximum feasible participation of private-for-profit operators. To be eligible, projects must be derived from a locally developed Coordinated Public Transit–Human Services Transporta- tion Plan. Other: (1) Eligible subrecipients include (a) private nonprofit organizations, (b) public bodies ap- proved by the state to coordinate services, and (c) public bodies that certify no nonprofit corporation or association is available to provide the services. (2) Funds provided under other federal programs (other than U.S. DOT with the exception of the Federal Lands Highway) may be used as match. (3) The state must submit to FTA a program-of-projects identifying all subrecipients. The proj- ects must be included in the STIP. (4) Compliance with the FTA annual list of certifications and assurances is required. Program Contact: Office of Program Management, Federal Transit Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, East Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-2053. http://www.fta.dot.gov/funding/grants/grants_financing_3556.html FTA Circular: FTA C 9070.1F. http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/C9070.1F.pdf Paul S. Sarbanes Transit in Parks Program (Section 5320) Program Purpose: The purpose of the Paul S. Sarbanes Transit in Parks Program is to address the increasing vehicle congestion and pollution in and around national parks and other federal lands. The program is designed to preserve natural, historical, and cultural resources; reduce congestion and traffic; enhance visitor experience; and make service available to all people including people with disabilities. This program provides funding for alternative transportation systems, such as shuttle buses, rail, trolleys and trams, ferries and waterborne vessels, bicycles, pedestrian trails, and other non-motorized services. Program Eligibility: Program funds may be used for: • Capital and planning expenses for new or existing alternative transportation services in and around national parks, national wildlife refuges, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) recre- ational areas, Bureau of Reclamation (BR) recreational areas, national forests, and communi- ties surrounding these areas. • Alternative transportation includes transportation by bus, rail, trolleys and trams, any public transportation, sightseeing service, ferries and waterborne vessels, pedestrian or bicycle trails, or intelligent transit systems (ITS) for transit. • Funds are not eligible for operating costs such as fuel and drivers’ salaries. Other: (1) Eligible recipients include federal land management agencies including BLM, BR, National Park Service (NPS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), and USDA Forest Service (USFS). (2) Eligible recipients also include state, local, and tribal governments working in collaboration with eligible recipients on eligible projects in eligible areas. A letter of consent from the federal land management agency or agencies expressing support for the project must be submitted. Program Contact: Office of Program Management, Federal Transit Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, East Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-2053. http://www.fta.dot.gov/funding/grants/grants_financing_6106.html Transportation for Elderly Persons and Persons with Disabilities Program (Section 5310) Federal Participation: 80% Program Funding: $133,825,717 (FY10) Distribution Method: Formula Grant to States Regulatory Reference: 49 U.S.C. 5310 Administering Agency: U.S. DOT—FTA Local Match: Must come from local sources or non-FTA sources. Match- ing funds may be avail- able from FHWA, HHS, DOL, and HUD funds. Paul S. Sarbanes Transit in Parks Program (Section 5320) Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $26,709,815 (FY10) Distribution Method: Discretionary Grant (Competitive) Regulatory Reference: 49 U.S.C. 5320 Administering Agency: U.S DOT—FTA; Interior; and USFS Local Match: Not needed.

potential Funding Sources 201 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 47 / Thursday, March 10, 2011 / Notices: http://www.gpo.gov/ fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-03-10/pdf/2011-5427.pdf Livable Communities Initiative Program Purpose: The FTA, EPA and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) initiated the Livable Communities Initiative to strengthen the link between transit and communities. Transit facilities and services that promote more livable communities are ones which are customer-friendly, community-oriented, and well-designed resulting from a planning and design process with active community involvement. The objectives of the Initiative are to improve mobility and the quality of services available to residents of neighborhoods by: • Strengthening the link between transit planning and community planning, including land use policies and urban design supporting the use of transit and ultimately providing physical assets that better meet community needs. • Stimulating increased participation by community organizations and residents, minority and low-income residents, small and minority businesses, persons with disabilities, and the elderly in the planning and design process. • Increasing access to employment, education facilities, and other community destinations through high-quality, community-oriented, technologically innovative transit services and facilities. • Leveraging resources available through other federal, state, and local programs. Program Eligibility: Eligible recipients are transit operators, metropolitan planning organi- zations, city and county governments, states, planning agencies, and other public bodies with the authority to plan or construct transit projects. Nonprofit, community, and civic organizations are encouraged to participate in project planning and development as partners with eligible recipients. Eligible project planning activities include: • The preparation of implementation plans and designs incorporating Livable Communities elements; • The assessment of environmental, social, economic, land use, and urban design impacts of projects, feasibility studies, and technical assistance; • Participation by community organizations and the business community, including small and minority-owned businesses, and persons with disabilities; • The evaluation of best practices; and • The development of innovative urban design, land use, and zoning practices. Program Contact: Office of Program Management, Federal Transit Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, 4th Floor East Building, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-4020. http:// ntl.bts.gov/DOCS/livbro.html Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Programs Congestion Mitigation/Air Quality Improvement Program Program Purpose: The purpose of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program (CMAQ) is to reduce transportation-related emissions in air quality non-attainment and maintenance areas. Program Eligibility: Eligible activities include • New transit systems and service expansions • Rideshare programs • New services and programs with air quality benefits Livable Communities Initiative Federal Participation: 80% Program Funding: $28,000,000 (FY10) Distribution Method: Competitive Grant Regulatory Reference: 49 U.S.C. Section 5309(a)(5) and (7) (formerly Sections 3(a)(1) (D) and (F) of the Federal Transit Act) Administering Agency: HUD and U.S. DOT Local Match: Must come from local sources or non-federal sources.

202 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook • Alternative fuel projects including vehicle refueling infrastructure, clean fuel fleet programs, and conversions • Other transportation projects with air quality benefits • Public education and outreach • Fare and fee subsidy programs • Transportation activities within approved State Implementation Plans (SIPs) • Transportation control measures in areas designated as non-attainment under the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) • Pedestrian and bicycle off-road or on-road facilities, including modification of public walk- ways to comply with the ADA • Transportation management and monitoring systems • Traffic management, monitoring, and congestion relief strategies • Telecommunications • Travel demand management • Diesel retrofits • Inspection and maintenance programs • Intermodal freight • Public–private partnerships and initiatives • Contracting with transportation management associations • Experimental pilot projects and innovative financing New single-occupancy vehicle (SOV) capacity projects are not eligible. Other: (1) CMAQ funds are apportioned to states by formula based on population and the severity of ozone and carbon monoxide pollution in their non-attainment or maintenance areas. (2) A state may transfer CMAQ funds to other program apportionments such as the Surface Transportation program and the Recreational Trails program. The amount transferred may not exceed 50 percent of the amount by which the state’s CMAQ apportionment for the fis- cal year exceeds the amount the state would have been apportioned if the program had been funded at $1.35 billion annually. (3) The following states are allowed flexibility in their use of CMAQ funds: (a) Montana—for operation of public transit activities that serve non-attainment or main- tenance areas (b) Michigan—for operation and maintenance of ITS strategies that serve a non-attainment or maintenance area (c) Maine—for operation of passenger rail service between Boston, Massachusetts, and Portland, Maine (d) Oregon—for operation of additional rail service between Eugene and Portland, Oregon (e) Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin—for purchase of alternative fuels or biodiesel (4) A state or metropolitan planning organization (MPO) may enter into a public-private part- nership agreement with any public, private, or nonprofit entity to implement any project funded under CMAQ. (5) If a state has no ozone or carbon monoxide non-attainment or maintenance areas, funds may be used for a Surface Transportation Program (STP) or CMAQ-eligible purpose. Program Contact: Office of Natural and Human Environment, Federal Highway Administra- tion, U.S. Department of Transportation, HCF-1, Room E74-302, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-2080. http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/safetealu/factsheets/cmaq. htm and http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/cmaqpgs/index.htm Congestion Mitigation— Air Quality Improvement Program Federal Participation: • 80% (General) • 90% (Interstate projects) • 100% (Certain safety, carpool, vanpool proj- ects; emergency tran- sit vehicle systems; signalization) Program Funding: $1,777,263,247 (FY09) Distribution Method: Formula Grant to States Regulatory References: SAFETEA-LU Sections: 1101(a) (5), 1103 (d), 1808; 23 U.S.C. 149 Administering Agency: U.S. DOT—FHWA Local Match: Must come from local sources or non-federal sources.

potential Funding Sources 203 Indian Reservation Roads Program Overview: The Indian Reservation Roads Program (IRR) is designed to address a variety of transportation needs for federally recognized tribal governments. It is jointly administered by the U.S. DOT FHWA Office of Federal Lands Highway (FLH) and the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Established in 1928, the program enabled cooperation between state highway agencies and the Interior Department to survey, construct, and maintain Indian reservation roads. In 1982, under the Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA), FLH was created with the IRR as one program within it. STAA expanded the IRR system to include BIA roads, tribally owned public roads, and state and county roads. Today, the IRR system covers • Roughly 27,800 miles of public roads on Indian reservations, owned by the BIA and desig- nated the BIA Road System • Roughly 31,000 miles of state and local public roads that provide access to and within tribal reservations • Roughly 1,700 miles of tribal-owned roads Program Purpose: The purpose of the IRR Program is to provide safe and adequate transporta- tion services and public access to and within Indian reservations, Indian lands, and communities for Indians and Alaska Natives (including visitors, recreational users, resource users, and others), while contributing to tribal economic development, self-determination, and employment. Program Eligibility: Eligible funding activities include • Provision of transit facilities and services within public lands, national parks, and Indian reservations • Transportation facility planning, research, engineering, construction, and reconstruction • Tourism enhancement and recreational development • Vehicular parking area improvements and additions • Interpretive signage installation • Scenic easement and scenic or historic site acquisition • Pedestrian and bicycle on- and off-road system improvements, including modification of public walkways to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) • Construction and reconstruction of roadside rest areas, including sanitary and water facilities • Other appropriate facilities such as visitor centers Program funds may be used as local match for federal-aid highway or transit projects that provide access to or within federal or Indian lands. The following arrangements also may apply: • IRR funds for highway, road, bridge, parkway, and transit facilities or projects on Indian reserva- tions are allocated directly to the requesting tribal government or consortium (two or more tribes) through FHWA. This includes any amount that would have been withheld for BIA administrative costs. The requesting government must demonstrate financial management and stability. • A tribal government may enter into a maintenance agreement with a state to maintain state roads within and serving its reservation. • Up to 25 percent of a tribal government’s IRR funds may be used for road and bridge main- tenance, although the BIA continues primary responsibility for maintaining facilities on the designated BIA Road System. Other: (1) Program funds are allocated by a relative need formula developed under negotiated rule making with tribal governments. Maximum utilization of the formula—and maximum share—requires the tribal government to maintain an updated IRR inventory. The inven- tory should list all eligible public roads that serve the reservation regardless of jurisdiction. Indian Reservation Roads Program Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $359,936,800 (FY10) Distribution Method: Formula Grant Regulatory References: 23 U.S.C. 101, 202, 203, 204; 25 CFR 170 Administering Agencies: U.S. DOT—FHWA and Interior—BIA Local Match: Not needed.

204 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook (2) Upon receiving the total fiscal year of IRR funding from FHWA, BIA publishes a notice-of- availability of funds in the Federal Register and transfers the funds to the federally recog- nized tribal governments within 30 days, as stipulated. (3) The IRR funds may only be expended on projects listed in an approved Tribal Transporta- tion Improvement Program (TTIP). Program Contacts: Office of Program Development, Federal Lands Highway, Federal High- way Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Wash- ington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-9494. Access http://flh.fhwa.dot.gov/programs/irr/ then go to Indian Reservation Roads Program Delivery Guide. Division of Transportation, Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1849 “C” Street, NW, Mail Stop 4512, MIB, Washington, D.C. 20240. (202) 513-7712 or (202) 513- 7714. http://www.doi.gov/ Note: The BIA does not post extensive program information on its website or by e-mail. If accessing the BIA web address shown above, users must search for the IRR Program. The infor- mation provided will be limited. Park Roads and Parkways Program Program Purpose: The purpose of the Park Roads and Parkways Program is to continually improve federal parkways and park roads. A parkway is defined as “a highway that has full or partial access control, is usually located within a park or a ribbon of park-like developments, and prohibits commercial vehicles.” Buses are not considered commercial vehicles in this case. Program Eligibility: Eligible activities include • Provision of transit facilities and services • Planning, design, construction, or reconstruction of designated roads that provide public access to or within national parks, recreational areas, historic areas, and other units of the NPS • Transportation planning to enhance tourism and recreational travel • Vehicular parking areas and interpretive signage • Scenic easement and scenic or historic site acquisition • Pedestrian and bicycle on-and-off road facilities, including modification of public walkways to comply with the ADA • Construction and reconstruction of roadside rest areas, including sanitary and water facilities • Other appropriate facilities such as visitor centers Other: (1) The FHWA and NPS jointly administer the program. (2) FHWA Federal Lands Highway is responsible for project design, construction, and oversight activities. The NPS develops the program-of-projects and oversees planning. (3) Fund allocations are based on the ranking of projects and approved by the Federal Highway Administration. Program Contact: Office of Program Development, Federal Lands Highway, Federal High- way Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Wash- ington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-9494. http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/flh/ and http://flh.fhwa.dot.gov/ programs/prp Public Lands Highway Program Program Purpose: The purpose of the Public Lands Highway Program (PLH) is to upgrade and improve transportation facilities and services within federal public lands. Park Roads and Parkways Program Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $240,000,000 (FY09) Distribution: Allocation to Program Regulatory Reference: 23 U.S.C. 101, 202, 203, 204 Administering Agencies: U.S. DOT—FHWA and Interior—NPS Local Match: Not needed. Public Lands Highway Program Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $102,000,000 (FY09) Distribution Method: Allocation to Program Regulatory References: • SAFETEA-LU Sections: 1101(a) (9) (D), 1119 • 23 U.S.C. 201, 202, 203, 204 • 23 CFR 660 Subpart A Administering Agency: U.S. DOT—FHWA Local Match: Not needed.

potential Funding Sources 205 Program Eligibility: Eligible grant activities include • Transportation planning, research, engineering, and construction of highways, roads, park- ways, transit, and non-motorized facilities on public lands, within national parks, and on Indian reservations • Operation and maintenance of transit facilities • Transportation planning for tourism and recreational enhancement • Vehicular parking areas and interpretive signage • Scenic easement and scenic or historic site acquisition • Pedestrian and bicycle on-and-off road facility improvements, including modification of public walkways to comply with the ADA • Construction and reconstruction of road side rest areas, including sanitary and water facilities • Other appropriate facilities such as visitor centers Program Contact: Federal Lands Highway, Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Depart- ment of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366- 9494. http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/discretionary/plhcurrsola3.cfm and http://flh.fhwa.dot.gov/ programs/plh/discretionary/documents/plhd.pdf Surface Transportation Program Program Purpose: The Surface Transportation Program (STP) offers flexible transporta- tion funding options to states and localities in support of an array of projects eligible for federal aid. Program Eligibility: Eligible activities include construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, resurfacing, restoration, and operational improvement for highways and bridges on public roads. Eligible activities also include • Capital costs for transit projects including vehicles and facilities used for intercity passenger bus service, whether publicly or privately owned • Transportation enhancement activities • Highway and transit safety infrastructure improvements and programs, hazard elimination, hazard mitigation related to wildlife crossings, and railway-highway road crossings • Carpool projects, fringe and corridor parking facilities, bicycle and pedestrian service, includ- ing public sidewalk modifications to comply with the ADA • Surface transportation planning programs • Highway and transit research, development, and technology programs • Seismic retrofit, painting, and application of calcium magnesium acetate or other environ- mentally acceptable, minimally corrosive anti-icing and de-icing composition on bridges and other elevated structures • Mitigation of damage to wildlife, habitat, and ecosystems. • Intersections with high accident rates and congestion, with a level of service no better than “F” during peak travel hours and located on a federal-aid highway • Infrastructure-based intelligent transportation systems capital improvements • Development of management systems • Capital and operating costs for traffic monitoring and system management, including advanced truck stop electrification systems • Transportation control measures • Environmental restoration and pollution abatement • Control of noxious weeds and establishment of native species • Participation in eligible natural habitat and wetland mitigation projects, including mitigation banks and state and regional conservation efforts Surface Transportation Program Federal Participation: • 80% (General) • 90% (Interstate HOV or Auxiliary Lanes) Program Funding: $6,577,000 (FY09) Distribution Method: Formula Grant to States Regulatory References: • SAFETEA-LU Sections: 1101(a)(4), 1103(f), 1113, 1603, 1960 and 6006 • 23 U.S.C. 133(d)(3) and 104(b)(3) Administering Agency: U.S. DOT—FHWA Local Match: Must come from local sources or non-federal sources.

206 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook Other: (1) Each state receives a minimum of one-half percent of the funds apportioned for the Surface Transportation Program. As a rule, state apportionments are based on the following factors: (a) Twenty-five percent—Total lane miles of federal-aid highways (b) Forty percent—Vehicle-miles traveled on lanes on federal-aid highways (c) Thirty-five percent—Estimated tax payments into the Highway Account of the High- way Trust Fund (2) A portion of the State Equity Bonus is added to its STP apportionment. (3) Ten percent of each state apportionment is set aside for safety construction activity such as hazard elimination and railway-highway crossings. (4) Ten percent of each state apportionment is set aside for transportation enhancement activity. (5) Fifty percent (62.5 percent of the remaining 80 percent) is divided between urbanized areas over 200,000 in population and the remaining areas of the state. (6) The remaining 30 percent (37.5 percent of the remaining 80 percent) may be used in any area of the state. (7) Areas of less than 5,000 population are guaranteed not less than 110 percent of the State FFY1991 secondary road program apportionment. Program Contact: Office of Program Administration, Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-4653. http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/safetealu/factsheets/stp.htm Transportation Enhancement Program Program Purpose: The Transportation Enhancement Program is intended to expand travel choices and enhance transportation experience by improving the cultural, historic, aesthetic and environmental aspects of the intermodal transportation systems. Program Eligibility: Eligible projects must demonstrate a relationship to surface transpor- tation. The project must be accessible to the public, and may be a “stand-alone” project or an additional enhancement to a larger highway project. The twelve eligible activities are as follows • Pedestrian and bicycle facilities • Pedestrian and bicycle safety and educational activities • Acquisition of scenic or historic easements and sites • Scenic or historic highway programs including tourist and welcome centers • Landscaping or scenic beautification • Historic preservation • Rehabilitation and operation of historic transportation buildings, structures, or facilities • Conversion of abandoned railway corridors to trails • Inventory, control, and removal of outdoor advertising • Archaeological planning and research • Environmental mitigation of runoff pollution and provision of wildlife connectivity • Establishment of transportation museums Program Contact: Office of Human Environment, Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, D.C. 20590. (202) 366-5013. http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/te/ U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Passenger Transportation Technical Assistance Program Program Purpose: The Rural Passenger Transportation Technical Assistance Program is funded through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Business Cooperative Service. It is designed to assist rural communities enhance economic growth by improving Transportation Enhancement Program Federal Participation: 80% Program Funding: $833,502,581 (FY09) Distribution Method: Formula Grant to States Regulatory Reference: SAFETEA-LU Sections 1113, 1122, 6003 Administering Agency: U.S. DOT—FHWA Local Match: Must come from local sources or non-federal sources.

potential Funding Sources 207 transportation services. The objective is to help small and emerging businesses and stimulate economic development through new and improved transportation programs. Technical assis- tance is provided for • Public transit problem solving • Transit service improvements and expansion • New system start-up • Policy and procedure development • Marketing • Transportation coordination • Training • Facility development Program Eligibility: To qualify, a project must be located within a rural area with a popula- tion of less than 50,000. Applications for assistance may be submitted by private-for-profit or nonprofit organizations or agencies. The project must benefit new or existing small and emerg- ing businesses. The program is administered by the CTAA. Applications submitted to CTAA are ranked by the following criteria: • Will the project help create or preserve jobs or small business? • Is the project located in an economically distressed area? • Is the project likely to be implemented after technical assistance has been provided? • Are project goals directly linked to economic development? • Will technical assistance be used innovatively to help resolve transportation issues and economic concerns? • Is there local consensus and community support for the project? Other: (1) Major project applications are solicited annually. (2) Once CTAA and USDA approve the application, there is a site visit and needs assessment. CTAA develops a project approach, work tasks, deliverable products, and explains the roles and responsibilities of the project participants. If the project requires assistance from independent consultants, CTAA may develop a consultant work plan, budget, and request-for-proposals. Program Contact: Community Transportation Association, 1341 G Street, NW, 10th Floor Washington, D.C. 20005. (202) 299-6593. http://web1.ctaa.org/webmodules/webarticles/ anmviewer.asp?a=49&z=5 Community Development Transportation Lending Services, Inc. Program Purpose: The Community Development Transportation Lending Services, Inc. (CDTLS) is a not-for-profit subsidiary of the CTAA, a lending institution that provides financ- ing in the transportation sector. CDTLS is certified by the Community Development Financial Institution Fund of the U. S. Department of the Treasury. The purpose of the CDTLS is to raise capital through active partnership with public agencies that can be used to finance a broad range of transportation and related investments or activities. It is designed to assist transit programs in rural communities by giving low-interest loans for improvements of transit programs. It was founded by CTAA in 2000. Loans range from $2,000 to $2,000,000. The objective is to assist transportation businesses and local communities in improving or expanding local transit services, building facilities, and promoting economic development in communities through financial assistance for many types of transportation projects. There are four basic elements to any finance package, including any offered by CDTLS: 1. A source of capital—CDTLS offers several sources of low-interest capital for transit financing. Rural Passenger Transportation Technical Assistance Program Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $500,000 (FY10) Distribution Method: Competitive Grant— Technical Assistance Regulatory References: 7 CFR Part 4284 Administering Agency: USDA—Rural Business Cooperative Service and the CTAA Local Match: Not needed. Community Development Transportation Lending Services, Inc. Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $2,600,000 (FY10) Distribution Method: Privately Arranged Low-interest Loans Administering Agency: USDA and the CTAA Local Match: Not needed.

208 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook 2. A finance mechanism—CDTLS uses five financing mechanisms such as long-term direct loan (for larger projects and whose terms vary but are generally 15 to 20 years); short-term direct loan (for operating expenses, vehicle purchases, insurance premiums, and other similar needs); lease purchase/buyback options (leasing options to the acquisition of capital assets, particularly vehicles and facilities); equity and partnership financing (for multi-funded proj- ects where an applicant ‘buys’ into a project as a percentage of equity to help secure additional financing); and credit enhancement options (bank letters of credit or government guarantees to assist in securing a loan). 3. A repayment stream—This is based on the type of each individual project. 4. Loan security or collateral—This is based on the type of each individual project. Program Eligibility: CDTLS has two product lines, the Capital Fund and the Business Oper- ating Fund. • The Capital Fund includes financing for transportation and railway facilities, multimodal facilities, community centers, HHS centers and co-location, vehicle financing, and local share financing for federal grants and contracts. • The Business Operating Fund includes financing for transit small business fund, micro-loans for transit software and hardware, working capital loans, insurance and self-insurance, and gap financing. Other: Eligible recipients include nonprofit, public or private transportation providers and transportation businesses. Program Contact: Community Transportation Association of America, 1341 G Street, NW, 10th Floor Washington, D.C. 20005. (202) 415-9862. http://web1.ctaa.org/webmodules/web articles/anmviewer.asp?a=53&z=36 Additional Resources Additional resources include USDA’s Rural Development Business and Cooperative Pro- grams at http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/busp/bprogs.htm. The loan and grant programs available through these programs include the following: • Business and Industry Guaranteed Loan (B&I) Program • Intermediary Relending Program (IRP) • Rural Business Enterprise Grant (RBEG) Program • Rural Economic Development Loan and Grant (REDLG) • Biorefinery Assistance Program Biorefinery Assistance Loan Guarantees (BIOREFINERY) • Bioenergy Program for Advanced Biofuels • Repowering Assistance Program • Rural Energy for America Program/Energy Audit and Renewable Energy Development Assis- tant (REAP/EA and REDA) • Rural Energy for America Program/Renewable Energy Systems/Energy Efficiency Improve- ment Program (REAP/RES/EEI) • Rural Energy for America Program/Feasibility (REAP/FEASIBILITY) • Rural Energy for America Program Guaranteed Loan Program (REAP LOAN) • Farmbill Initiatives—REAP Tribal Passenger Transportation Technical Assistance Program Program Purpose: The Tribal Passenger Transportation Technical Assistance Program is funded through the USDA Rural Business Cooperative Service. It is intended to provide techni- cal assistance to Native American tribes for enhanced economic growth by improving passenger transportation services and facilities. The program is administered by the CTAA, which provides the technical assistance. This involves on-site and off-site evaluations and review over a period of Tribal Passenger Transportation Technical Assistance Program Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $250,000 (FY10) Distribution Method: Competitive Grant— Technical Assistance Regulatory References: 7 CFR Part 4284 Administering Agency: USDA—Rural Business Cooperative Service and CTAA Local Match: Not needed.

potential Funding Sources 209 6 to 12 months. No local match is required, but recipients should provide some form of in-kind support. Program technical assistance includes • Facility development • Transit service improvements and expansion • New system start-up • Policy and procedure development • Marketing • Transportation coordination • Training • Public transit problem solving Program Eligibility. To qualify for assistance, tribes must be federally recognized. Program applications are submitted to CTAA and ranked by the following criteria: • Number of new jobs to be created • Potential economic impact resulting from implementation of project • Level of economic distress in the community • Potential for implementation after technical assistance phase of project is completed • Demonstrated consensus and support in the community • Potential for development of unique or innovative strategies, techniques, or approaches in solving identified problems • Potential for replication of the project elsewhere Other: (1) Major project applications are solicited annually. (2) Once CTAA and USDA approve the application, there is a site visit and needs assessment. CTAA develops a project approach, work tasks, deliverable products, and explains the roles and responsibilities of the project participants. If the project requires assistance from independent consultants, CTAA may develop a consultant work plan, budget, and request-for-proposals. Program Contact: Community Transportation Association of America, 1341 G Street, NW, 10th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20005. (202) 299-6593. http://web1.ctaa.org/webmodules/web articles/anmviewer.asp?a=49&z=5 U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration Grants Program Purpose: The Economic Development Administration (EDA) of the U.S. Depart- ment of Commerce (DoC) provides financial assistance to rural and urban distressed com- munities. EDA grants support capital facilities in economically distressed areas, including transportation facilities and infrastructure improvements. Two grant programs specific to tran- sit and transportation improvements are Public Works and Economic Development Invest- ments and Special Impact Areas. Public Works/Economic Development Investments Program: The program is for the most distressed communities. Its purpose is to revitalize, expand, and upgrade the physical infra- structure to attract new industry, encourage business expansion, diversify local economies, and generate or retain long-term private sector jobs and investments. The goal is to create new, or retain existing, long-term private sector jobs in communities experiencing distress as evidenced by chronic high unemployment, underemployment, and low per capita income. Special Impact Areas: A region or area may be designated a Special Impact Area if it dem- onstrates a pressing need to alleviate unemployment and underemployment. An Indian tribe located within a distressed rural region may be designated a Special Impact Area. Economic Development Administration Grants Federal Participation: Variable Program Funding: $114,280,000 (FY09) Distribution Method: Competitive Grants Regulatory Reference: 42 USC 3211, 3141, 3154 Department of Commerce Organization Order 10-4 Administering Agency: Commerce—EDA Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds.

210 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook Program Eligibility: Public bodies, private nonprofit organizations, and Indian tribes are eligible for EDA grants. Most of the funds are awarded to state and local economic develop- ment agencies, which in turn work with local partners in the planning and provision of services, including transportation services. Eligibility criteria include (but are not limited to) • Evidence of eligibility • Evidence of an EDA-approved Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) • Evidence that the project will directly or indirectly assist in creating long-term employment opportunities and benefit the long-term unemployed and members of low-income families Program Contact: Economic Development Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 14th and Constitution Avenue NW, Office 7800, Washington, D.C. 20230. (202) 482-5081. http:// www.eda.gov/AboutEDA/Programs.xml and http://www.eda.gov/ImageCache/EDAPublic/ documents/pdfdocs2008/13cfrchapter_20iii_2d2006andifr_2epdf/v1/13cfrchapter_20iii_2d20 06andifr.pdf U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Vocational Rehabilitation Services Project for American Indians with Disabilities Program Purpose: The purpose of the Vocational Rehabilitation Services Project for Ameri- can Indians with Disabilities is to assist tribal governments in establishing and operating voca- tional rehabilitation services for members with disabilities residing on or near federal or state reservations. Administered by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) Office of Special Educa- tion and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), the program’s goal is to enable gainful employment for these members. Program services are provided under an individualized plan for employment and may include transportation services. Program Eligibility: The governing body of an Indian tribe or consortia of tribes is eligible. Eligible transportation services are defined as “transportation, including adequate training in the use of public transportation vehicles and systems, which is provided in connection with the provi- sion of any other service . . . and needed by the individual to achieve an employment outcome.” A grantee may provide vocational rehabilitation services directly or contract these services with a designated state unit, a community rehabilitation program, or another agency to assist in the implementation of the vocational rehabilitation service. A grantee may also enter into an intertribal arrangement with governing bodies of other Indian tribes for carrying out a project that serves more than one tribe. Program Contact: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Room 5051, PCP, Washington, D.C. 20202. (202) 245-7485. http://www.rsa.ed.gov/programs. cfm?pc=AIVRS&sub=purpose and http://www2.ed.gov/programs/vramerind/2009-250a- reopen.pdf U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Public and Indian Housing Indian Housing Block Grants Program Program Purpose: The formula-based Indian Housing Block Grants Program (IHBG) pro- vides grants to tribal governments and their designated housing enterprises for housing develop- ment, assistance and other services needed by tribal housing residents. Transportation facilities and services designed for these persons are eligible for funding. Vocational Rehabilitation Services Project for American Indians with Disabilities Federal Participation: 90% Program Funding: $23,390,000 (FY09) Distribution Method: Discretionary Grants Regulatory Reference: Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended—Title I, Part C, Sec. 121; 29 U.S.C. 741 Administering Agency: ED—OSERS Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds. Indian Housing Block Grants Program Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $700,000,000 (FY10) Distribution Method: Formula-based Grants Regulatory Reference: Native American Hous- ing Assistance and Self- Determination Act of 1996; 24 CFR Part 1000, Subpart D Administering Agency: HUD—Office of Community Planning and Development Local Match: Not needed.

potential Funding Sources 211 The formula for distributing grants has two elements—Need and Formula Current Assisted Stock, as follows: • Need considers population, income, and housing conditions. • Formula Current Assisted Stock covers housing developed under the U.S. Housing Act (the predecessor of IHBG) and is owned or operated by the IHBG recipient and provides funds for ongoing operation of the housing. Program Eligibility: Federally recognized tribes or their designated housing entities are eli- gible. Eligible activities include housing development, assistance to housing developed under the Indian Housing Program, housing services to eligible families and individuals, crime prevention and safety, and creative approaches to solving affordable housing problems. Grantees must submit an Indian Housing Plan annually to receive funding. At the end of each year, recipients must also submit an Annual Performance Report. Program Contact: Public and Indian Housing, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW, Washington, D.C. 20410. (202) 708-0950. http://www. hud.gov/offices/pih/ih/grants/ihbg.cfm U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families Community Services Block Grant Program Program Purpose: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Administration for Children and Families administers the Community Services Block Grant Program (CSBG), which offers services and activities to assist the needs of low-income, homeless, migrant, and elderly persons. Grant amounts are determined by a formula based on the poverty populations within each state and tribe. Tribes receiving CSBGs address employment, education, housing, nutrition, emergency services, or health needs and services. An important element of the program is the Job Opportunities for Low-income Individuals (JOLI) program, through which the HHS Office of Community Services awards discretionary grants to local nonprofits that create employment and business opportunities for welfare recipi- ents and the low-income. Transportation services are commonly provided in both the block grant and JOLI programs. Program Eligibility: The CSBG application should contain • Specific assurances certified by the chief executive officer of the tribal organization • Evidence that the Tribal CSBG Plan was made available for public review and comment in conjunction with development of the plan • A tribal resolution adopting the plan • State recognition that the group is an Indian tribe and verification that it is eligible for funding • A plan and a narrative explaining how the tribe will carry out required legislative assurances and that includes – A statement of goals and objectives – Information on the specific types of activities to carry out programmatic and administra- tive assurances – Areas and categories of individuals to be served – The criteria and method used for the distribution of funds • An annual report describing how the tribe met any previous year CSBG goals and objectives. • Administrative verifications indicating the date of the last program audit and the period it covers. Community Services Block Grant Program Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $700,000,000 (FY10) Distribution Method: Formula-based grants Regulatory Reference: Pub. L. 97-35— Community Services Block Grant Act; Title VI, Subtitle B of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981 Administering Agency: HHS—Office of Community Services Local Match: Not needed.

212 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook Program Contact: Office of Community Services, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 370 L’Enfant Promenade, SW, 5th Floor, Wash- ington, D.C. 20447. (202) 401-9333. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ocs/csbg/index.html Head Start Program Program Purpose: The purpose of the Head Start Program is to provide comprehensive services for economically disadvantaged preschool children and families, with special focus on helping preschoolers with early reading and math skills. Funds may be used to provide transportation services, acquire vehicles, and provide technical assistance to local Head Start centers. Program Eligibility: Grants are awarded to local public agencies, private nonprofit and for- profit organizations, Indian tribes, and school systems for the purpose of operating Head Start programs at the community level. Grants are awarded by the HHS Administration for Children and Families Regional Offices and the HHS Office of Head Start’s American Indian–Alaska Native, Migrant, and Seasonal Program Branches. Program Contact: Head Start Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 330 C Street, SW, Room 2018, Washington, D.C. 20201. (202) 205-8572. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/hsb/ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Medicaid Program Program Purpose: The Medicaid program is the primary source of medical assistance for 56 million low-income and disabled Americans. It provides health coverage to those without health insurance. Medicaid beneficiaries include children, the aged, the blind, the disabled, and the low-income. Although the federal government created and regulates Medicaid, each state designs and administers its own Medicaid program. The federal government matches state expenditures with an Assistance Percentage, which is no lower than 50 percent. As part of the 2009 Health Care Reform package, an estimated 25 million additional individuals may become eligible for this program. Specific to transportation, states must enable transportation services to access program ser- vices, when necessary. Each state sets its own transportation guidelines, payment mechanisms, and participation guidelines. For employment-related transportation services, the 1999 Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act (TWWIIA) expanded the scope of Medicaid to provide health coverage and services for eligible persons with disabilities entering the workforce. Specific coverage and services are: • Medicaid Buy-In: TWWIIA enables health care services to workers with severe disabilities by establishing a Medicaid State Plan buy-in option for eligible groups. • Medicaid Infrastructure Grants: TWWIIA provides grants to states to develop infrastruc- tures to support working persons with disabilities. The state offers personal assistance services within and outside the home to support an individual in full-time competitive employment. • Personal Assistance Services: Personal Assistance is a range of services provided by one or more providers that assist a disabled person in performing daily activities on and off the job. • Peer Support Services: Peer support providers deliver counseling and other support services to Medicaid-eligible adults with mental illnesses and/or substance use disorders. Program Eligibility: Eligibility for Medicaid benefits depends on the state in which a person lives. The eligibility of transportation providers for Medicaid-funded programs varies signifi- cantly by state. Head Start Program Federal Participation: 80% to 100% Program Funding: $8,200,000 (FY11) Distribution Method: State Determination Regulatory References: Head Start Act, as amended; 42 USC 9801 et seq. Administering Agency: HHS—Office of Head Start Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds. Medicaid Program Federal Participation: Assistance Percentage Program Funding: $271,446,000 (All Medicaid programs, FY11) Distribution Method: State Determination Regulatory References: • Title XIX of the Social Security Act • 42 U.S.C.(The Public Health and Welfare) • Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act, Pub. L. No. 106-170, § 203 (b)(2)(B)(ii) Administering Agency: HHS—Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and state-desig- nated Medicaid agency Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds.

potential Funding Sources 213 Program Contact: Medicaid and State Operations, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Ser- vices, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Room C5-22- 23, Baltimore, Maryland 21244. (410) 786.3870. http://www.cms.gov/center/ir.asp and http:// www.cms.gov/center/PeopleWithMedicareCenter.asp HHS Administration on Aging Programs for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders Program Purpose: The HHS Native Americans programs were first established in 1978 with the provision of nutrition and supportive services. In 2000, caregiver support was added. Through these programs, grants are awarded to tribal organizations for the delivery of home- and community-based supportive services including nutrition and transportation services. The grants are intended to reduce the need for institutional care and medical interventions. They cover a range of services for older Native Americans, including • Congregate and home-delivered meals • Information and referral • Transportation • Personal care • Chores • Health promotion and disease prevention • Other supportive services Program Eligibility: Formula grants are awarded to tribal organizations based on their share of the senior American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian population in their service area. To be eligible for funding, federally recognized tribes must represent at least 50 Native American elders (age 60 and over). There is no match requirement. Separate formula grants are awarded for nutrition and supportive services and caregiver support services. After meeting program requirements, tribal organizations have the flexibility to allocate resources among the various eligible activities. Tribes may also decide the age at which a mem- ber is considered an elder and thus eligible for services. Program Contact: American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Programs, Admin- istration on Aging, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 330 Independence Avenue, SW, Room 4743, Washington, D.C. 20201. (202) 690-7776. http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/ AoA_Programs/HCLTC/Native_Americans/index.aspx Health Resources and Services Administration Rural Health Outreach Grant Program Program Purpose: Administered by the HHS Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Rural Health Outreach Grant Program expands the delivery of services in rural areas. The program supports projects that are creative and effective models of health care out- reach and delivery. The emphasis is on collaboration. The lead applicant organization typically forms a consortium with at least two additional partners. Through the consortium, rural com- munities receive hospice, dental care, home health care, emergency care, outpatient day care, mental health services, and health promotion and education services. Some community centers provide their own transportation services. Others contract with transportation providers. A competitive grant cycle for FY2010 and FY2011 is not anticipated. However, grantees awarded in FY2009 are eligible to apply for the non-competitive cycle in these years. The next competitive cycle will be FY2012. Programs for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $38,000,000 (FY11) Distribution Method: Formula Grant Regulatory Reference: Title VI of the Older Americans Act—Sections 613, 623 and 631 Administering Agency: HHS—AoA Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds. Rural Health Outreach Grants Program Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $57,000,000 (FY11) Distribution Method: Competitive Grant Regulatory Reference: Public Health Service Act, Title III, Sections 330A and 330A (e) Administering Agency: HHS—HRSA, Office of Rural Health Policy Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds.

214 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook Program Eligibility: (1) An applicant’s organization and proposed services must be located in a rural county or in a rural census tract of an urban county. Exceptions to this are Migrant Health Clinics and feder- ally recognized tribal governments that provide services on federally recognized tribal land. (2) Applicants may propose projects to address the needs of a range of population groups in- cluding low-income populations, elderly persons, pregnant women, infants, adolescents, rural minority populations, and rural populations with special health needs. All projects should be responsive to the cultural, social, religious, and linguistic needs of the target population. Program Contact: Office of Rural Health Policy, Health Resources and Services Administra- tion, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 5600 Fishers Lane, 10B-45, Rockville, Maryland 20857. (301) 443-6894. http://www.hrsa.gov/ruralhealth/ and https://grants.hrsa.gov/ webexternal/FundingOppDetails.asp?FundingCycleId=99865F79-FF7E-4A12-80D6-0C51287F1 E14&ViewMode=EU&GoBack=&PrintMode=&OnlineAvailabilityFlag=True&pageNumber=1 Administration for Native Americans Social and Economic Development Strategies Program of the Administration for Native Americans Program Purpose: The HHS Administration for Native Americans (ANA) administers the Social and Economic Development Strategies Program (SEDS). The purpose of SEDS is to pro- mote economic and social self-sufficiency for American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawai- ians, and other Native American Pacific Islanders. SEDS provides funding for projects to support the interests of children and families and to strengthen communities. SEDS covers several program areas. Transportation is under the category of economic devel- opment, which is defined as the physical, commercial, technological, industrial, and agricultural components necessary for a sustainable local community. As stated by HHS, transportation projects that meet this objective should “develop a transportation infrastructure to support the local workforce or those faced with transportation challenges (e.g., the elderly or disabled).” Program Eligibility: American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and other Native American Pacific Islanders may apply for funding. Requests require a formal application and process which includes (at minimum): • Project narrative explaining project objectives, need for assistance, connection, and commit- ment to community • Problem statement and project goal • Project approach explaining project strategy, project sustainability, organizational capacity, and contingency planning • Expected program outcomes including impact indicators • Budget request and budget justification Program Contact: Administration for Native Americans, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 370 L’Enfant Promenade, SW, 2nd Floor—West, Washington, D.C. 20447. (877) 922-9262. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ana/programs/program_information.html Administration on Aging Special Programs for the Aging—Title III, Part B: Grants for Supportive Services and Senior Centers Program Purpose: The HHS Administration on Aging offers Special Programs for the Aging—Part B, which are designed to enable state and area agencies on aging to implement comprehensive and coordinated community services for older individuals. The objective is to enable older Americans to remain in their homes and communities. Eligible activities include Social and Economic Development Strategies Program Federal Participation: 80% Program Funding: $6,000,000 (FY10) Distribution Method: Competitive Grant Regulatory Reference: Section 803(a) of the Na- tive American Programs Act of 1974; 42 U.S.C. 2991b and 2991b-3 Administering Agency: HHS—ANA Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds. Special Programs for the Aging, Part B— Supportive Services and Senior Centers Federal Participation: 85% Obligations: $361,348,000 (FY10) Distribution Method: Formula Grants Regulatory Reference: Older Americans Act of 1965, Title III, Parts A and B, Public Law 89-73, as amended Administering Agency: HHS—AoA Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds.

potential Funding Sources 215 nutritional services, transportation services, in-home services, and caregiver support services. Funds also are used for the renovation, acquisition, alteration, and construction of multipurpose senior centers. Beneficiaries of the programs are individuals ages 60 and over with the greatest economic and social needs, and those residing in rural areas. Program Eligibility: Only states and U.S. territories with governor-designated agencies on aging are eligible to receive grants. Funds are distributed to area agencies in states with planning and service areas and directly to service providers in the 13 states designated as single-planning- and-service-area states. Funds are awarded through a statutory formula to state agencies on aging which may, in turn, award funds to sub-state level organizations which they have desig- nated. Formula grants are typically 85 percent federal and 15 percent non-federal funds. Program eligibility requires that a State Plan be submitted for approval to the HHS assistant secretary for aging. Area plans must be submitted to state agencies for approval. Program Contact: Administration on Aging, U.S. Department of Health and Human Ser- vices, One Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. 20201. (202) 357-0150. http://www. federalgrantswire.com/special-programs-for-the-agingtitle-iii-part-bgrants-for-supportive- services-and-senior-centers.html Special Programs for the Aging—Title III, Part C: Grants for Nutrition Services Program Purpose: The purpose of the Special Programs for the Aging—Part C is to provide grants to states to deliver nutrition services including meals, education, and other nutrition- related services to older Americans to maintain their health, independence, and quality of life. Meals may be provided in a congregate setting or delivered to the home at least once per day and 5 or more days per week, except in rural areas where a lesser frequency is determined feasible. Beneficiaries are individuals ages 60 and over and their spouses. Program Eligibility: Only states and U.S. territories with governor-designated state agencies on aging are eligible. Statutory awards are through a formula which is typically 85 percent federal and 15 percent non-federal. The non-federal portion may be cash or in-kind contributions that may include plant, equipment, or services. A State Plan must be submitted for approval to the HHS assistant secretary for aging. Program Contact: Office of Home and Community-Based Services, Administration on Aging, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, One Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washing- ton, D.C. 20201. (202) 357-0150. http://www.federalgrantswire.com/special-programs-for-the- agingtitle-iii-part-cnutrition-services.html Indian Health Service Tribal Self-Governance Program Program Purpose: Federally recognized tribes provide health services to approximately 1.5 million (57 percent) of the American Indian and Alaska Native populations in 35 states. The services are administered through the HHS Indian Health Services Tribal Self-Governance Program (TSGP). The program represents 72 self-governance tribal compacts and 93 funding agreements involving 322 tribes. The compacts and agreements enable tribal governments to administer and manage their own health care programs with minimal federal intrusion and involvement. Program services may involve and require delivery of transportation services. Program Eligibility: Federally recognized tribes are eligible. Program Contact: Indian Health Service, Office of Tribal Self-Governance, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 801 Thompson Avenue, Suite 240, Rockville, Maryland 20852. (301) 443-7821. http://www.ihs.gov/selfgovernance/index.cfm?module=program Special Programs for the Aging, Part C— Nutrition Services Federal Participation: 85% Obligations: $648,818,000 (FY10) Distribution Method: Formula Grants Regulatory Reference: Older Americans Act of 1965, Title III, Parts A and B, Public Law 89-73, as amended Administering Agency: HHS—AoA Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds. Tribal Self-Governance Program Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $9,000,000 (FY11) Distribution Method: Self-Governance Tribal Compact/Funding Agreement Regulatory References: • Public Law 100-472 • Public Law 102-573 • Public Law 106-260 • Title V—Tribal Self-Governance Administering Agency: HHS—IHS Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds.

216 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook Tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program Program Purpose: Tribes receive Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) formula grants for cash assistance, work opportunities, and support services for needy families with chil- dren. Each tribal community has the flexibility to develop and implement its welfare programs. The grants may be for a range of transportation services, such as • Transportation allowances to cover incidental expenses and participation-related expenses for unemployed families • Transit passes or tokens • Agreement with another agency to use its buses or vans or share in the costs of purchasing transportation services • Invest in reverse commute projects and other initiatives that enable needy parents to access jobs • Reimbursement for mileage, auto repairs, or auto insurance to support finding employment and job retention • Contract with a private organization or service to refurbish previously owned cars for TANF recipients or provide financing support that enables recipients to purchase a car • Subsidize costs of transporting needy children to child care Program Eligibility: Eligibility is restricted by law to federally recognized tribes in the lower 48 states and to the 12 designated Alaska Native regional nonprofit associations and the Met- lakatla Indian Community in Alaska. Tribes must submit a TANF Plan to a HHS Regional Office and to the HHS Division of Tribal TANF Management. The plan must cover a maximum of three years. Upon approval, grant funds are withdrawn from the state’s TANF Block Grant and allocated to the tribe. The dollar amount awarded is equal to the dollar amount of federal funds the state expended for related programs for the designated service population in prior years. In addition, states may also, at their discretion, provide state maintenance-of-effort funds to tribal grantees. Program Contact: Division of Tribal TANF Management, Office of Family Assistance, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 370 L’Enfant Promenade SW, 5th Floor East, Washington, D.C. 20447. (202) 401-5020. http:// www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/dts/resources/fact_sheets.html#tta and http://www.acf.hhs.gov/ programs/ofa/ U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) Program Purpose: The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Employment and Training Admin- istration (ETA) offers the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) as a training program for older workers. SCSEP provides subsidized, service-based training for low- income persons who are unemployed. Program participants must be at least 55 years of age, unemployed, and have a family income of no more than 125 percent of the federal poverty level. SCSEP services are accessed through One-Stop Career Centers. Participants work an average of 20 hours a week and are paid the highest of the federal, state, or local minimum wage. They provide community service at nonprofit and public facilities including daycare centers, senior centers, schools, and hospitals. The SCSEP goal is to place 30 percent of its participants into unsubsidized employment each year. Transportation to and from employment is among the services provided through this program. Tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $21,001,000 (All TANF Programs, FY11) Distribution Method: Annual Block Grant/ Annual State Maintenance-of- Effort Grant Regulatory Reference: Public Law 104-193— Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 Administering Agency: HHS—Office of Family Assistance Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds. The Senior Community Service Employment Program Federal Participation: 100% Program Funding: $825,425,000 (FY10) Distribution Method: Formula Grant Regulatory Reference: The Older Americans Act (OAA) Amendments of 2006; Pub. L. 109-365 Administering Agency: DOL—ETA Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds.

potential Funding Sources 217 Program Eligibility: SCSEP funds are allocated by a formula, with • Twenty-two percent allocated among states and territories • Seventy-eight percent allocated to national organizations that compete to provide services States often sub-grant with area agencies on aging or community-based organizations. Trans- portation providers interested in participating in the SCSEP program are directed to national grantees, such as the AARP and the National Indian Council on Aging, or to state grantees, such as state departments on aging. Program Contact: Division of Adult Services, Office of Workforce Investment, U.S. Depart- ment of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Room S-4209, Washington, D.C. 20210. (202) 693–3046. http://www.doleta.gov/Seniors/pdf/FinalRule2010.pdf and http://www.doleta.gov/ seniors/html_docs/aboutscsep.cfm Workforce Investment Act Programs Program Purpose: The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) provides funding to state and local workforce development agencies for youth, adult, and dislocated worker employment and train- ing services. The funds may be used to provide transportation to training. One major category of WIA funding is the Indian and Native American Employment and Training Program. This program supports the employment and training needs of Indian and Native American adults and youth through competitive 2-year grants. Program Eligibility: Eligible applicants for the Indian and Native American Employment and Training Program are • Federally recognized Indian tribes • Tribal organizations • Alaskan Native–controlled organizations • Native Hawaiian–controlled entities • Native American–controlled organizations • State-recognized tribal organizations • Consortia of eligible entities which individually meet the criteria for eligibility Program applications require • A letter signed by an authorized official or a tribal resolution • A Dun and Bradstreet (DUNS) number • A budget narrative describing costs and leveraged resources • Documentation of the applicant’s legal status • Description of the geographic service area • Demonstration that applicant has or can acquire the necessary program and management personnel to administer the proposed program • Demonstration that applicant has the ability to obtain or retain unsubsidized employment for clients • Summary of past employment and training or human resources development programs and experiences • Description of the proposed program planning process Application evaluations include • Demonstration of a clear and specific understanding of employment, training, and education barriers encountered by the proposed service population • Data and analysis of the employment outlook for the geographic service area • Experience in implementing and operating programs that serve Indians, Alaskan Natives, and/or Native Hawaiians Workforce Investment Act Programs Federal Participation: 100% • Program Funding: Adult Program: $53,000,000 (FY11) • Youth Program: $14,000,000 (FY11) Distribution Method: Competitive Grant Regulatory Reference: Pub. L.105-220 as amended; Section 166 of the Workforce Investment Act Administering Agency: HHS—AoA Local Match: May be used to match FTA funds.

218 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook • Capacity to operate an employment and training program • Proposed recruitment and pre-training activities, education, training, placement, and reten- tion strategies Other: (1) The program does not require cost-sharing or local match. (2) Typically, the grantee is required to participate in the One-Stop delivery system. The grantee and the local board which oversees the operation of an area One-Stop Center must execute a memorandum of understanding. The One-Stop Centers coordinate delivery of WIA activi- ties and federal and state employment services, such as unemployment insurance benefits, welfare-to-work activities, trade adjustment assistance to dislocated workers, veteran em- ployment and training, and related workforce activities. (3) Designation as a grantee does not automatically result in an award. Designees must obtain DOL approval of their 2-year Comprehensive Service Plan. (4) After DOL approval, a grant agreement that includes required certifications and assurances is executed. Funds are released upon Notice of Obligation. Program Contact: Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Room S-2307, Washington, D.C. 20210. (202) 693-2700. http:// www.doleta.gov/grants/pdf/SGA-DFA-PY-09-04.pdf U.S. Department of the Interior 477 Program Program Purpose: The U.S. Department of the Interior’s “477 Program” helps tribes simplify their federally funded programs’ reporting requirements and helps tribes devote up to 25 per- cent of their total resources to train a workforce for their economic development projects. The main objective of the 477 Program is combining funds from twelve different agencies into one program—having a single plan to implement needed services and a single reporting structure to replace different reporting structures, thereby reducing the administrative burden tribes face without reducing accountability. No separate funds are available under this program; instead, all money is money that tribes would otherwise receive from a variety of programs. In some instances, the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) has solicited applica- tions to assist a limited number of tribal grantees to develop 477 Program plans. Funding pro- vided was up to $25,000 for each tribal grantee. For more details, please see the Federal Register: Announcement of Fund Availability, Competitive Grant Program at http://edocket.access.gpo. gov/2006/pdf/E6-8864.pdf. Program Eligibility: All tribes that receive federal funds. Program Contact: Division of Workforce Development, Office of Indian Energy and Eco- nomic Development, U.S. Department of the Interior. 1951 Constitution Avenue N.W., Wash- ington, D.C. 20245. (202) 219-0740. http://www.nativeworkplace.com/R477.html www.grants.gov The website www.grants.gov was established to provide a resource for agencies, nonprofit organizations, and governments to research and apply for grant funding. The website main- tains current information on over 1,000 different grants. Information included for each grant includes the eligibility requirements, application deadlines, funding agency, grant descrip- tion, and how to apply for the specific grant. Applicants register their respective agency with the site, search for grants, and apply for grants all within a specific platform. This some- what streamlines the process of having to apply for grant funding through multiple sources and media.

potential Funding Sources 219 State Programs Many states have their own funding programs for public transportation. Tribes are eligible for these programs for the state in which they are located. Several examples of state programs are provided in this section, but it is not meant to be a complete list. State programs are unique to each state and are subject to change. Each tribe is encouraged to investigate programs in their state and determine if they should apply for funding. This may also depend on the relationship between the tribe and the state government. State of Arizona—Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System Program Purpose: The Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) is a state program that administers health care for individuals enrolled in Medicaid and the state Chil- dren’s Health Insurance Program (KidsCare). For tribal members, AHCCCS contracts with tribal health facilities for service delivery which includes transportation access. Program Eligibility: Eligible tribal members and their children may choose to receive health services through Indian Health Service Facilities, tribally operated 638 Health Programs, and Urban Indian Health Programs. These providers bill AHCCCS for services rendered. Services vary from one facility to another and may include • Emergency health care services • Primary care • Children’s health care • Dental services • Immunizations • Behavioral health care To become an AHCCCS provider or contractor, all entities including tribal organizations must • Complete an online application • Meet AHCCCS requirements and standards for professional licensure, certification, or registration • Sign a Provider Agreement with AHCCCS requiring compliance with state and federal requirements Other: (1) Seven Arizona tribes have long-term care case management Intergovernmental Agreements with AHCCCS. They are referred to as tribal contractors and include the Gila River Indian Community, Hopi Tribe, Navajo Nation, Pascua Yaqui Tribe, San Carlos Apache Tribe, Tohono O’Odham Nation, and White Mountain Apache Tribe. (2) Services are also provided through the Native American Community Health Center for 13 participating tribes. Program Contact: Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System, Attn.: Tribal Relations Liaison, 801 East Jefferson Street, MD-4100, Phoenix, Arizona 85034. (602) 417-4610. http:// www.azahcccs.gov/tribal/providers/AIHP.aspx and http://www.azahcccs.gov/tribal/contacts. aspx#American_Indian_Health_Program_(AIHP)_Technical_Assistance State of California—Transportation Development Act Program Purpose: The California Transportation Development Act (TDA) was enacted in 1971 to support and encourage regionally coordinated public transportation. The TDA creates two sources of funding • A Local Transportation Fund (LTF) derived from a ¼-cent general sales tax collected statewide • A State Transit Assistance Fund (STA) derived from a statewide sales tax on diesel fuel State of Arizona— Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System State Participation: 100% Program Funding: • $1,379,268 (FY11 Budget) • $7,693,388,400 (FY11 Revenue) Distribution Method: Direct Payment to Provider for Billed Services Regulatory Reference: Arizona Revised Statutes Title 36, Chapter 29, Articles 1-5 Administering Agency: Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System— Tribal Relations Division Local Match: Not needed.

220 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook Funds are allotted to all geographic areas of the state. They pay for • Community transit services and operations • Public transportation services and operations • Public transportation planning and program activities • Pedestrian and bicycle facilities • Bus and rail projects Four entities are central to the TDA process. 1. State government oversees funding allocations to local and county government. 2. The Transportation Planning Agency (TPA) receives, evaluates, and awards claims to transpor- tation operators. The TPA manages the mandatory public participation process and conducts assessments on transit needs in its area. 3. The Transportation operators provide public transportation services within their area. They apply for and receive claims awarded by formula from the TPA for capital and operating expenses. All operators, including tribal providers, may submit claims for TDA monies ap- portioned in their area. 4. The Public Works Department, under certain conditions, receives funds for streets and roads maintenance. TDA Process: The process for distributing money from the LTF and the STA is summarized here. LTF: On a quarterly basis, the State Board of Equalization returns the ¼-cent tax revenue to each county in proportion to the amount of tax revenue collected within it. Funds are distrib- uted in three ways, as follows: 1. Apportionment. Revenues from the county LTF are apportioned by population to areas within each county. An area can be a transit district, a city, and/or a county. An apportion- ment is an estimate of the LTF funds to be allocated. 2. Allocation. Once apportioned, funds are allocated to the TPA which pays claims submitted by transportation operators in its area. Claims may be for any purpose necessary to develop and operate a public transit system including • System operation, maintenance, and repair • Purchase and replacement of vehicles, including those for handicapped persons • Acquisition of real property • Construction of facilities and buildings • Planning and contributions to the transportation planning process • Counties with populations under 500,000 also use LTF for road construction and maintenance 3. Claim Payment. Payment of claims is provided in lump sum, installments, or as funds be- come available. STA: The STA supports public transportation planning and mass transportation only. Funds are apportioned and allocated. 1. Apportionment. The California State Legislature apportions funds to the state controller for allocation by formula to each TPA. STA is also apportioned to five county transportation commissions and the San Diego Metropolitan Transit Development Board. 2. Allocation. Fifty percent of STA is allocated by formula to each area TPA in accordance with population. The remaining 50 percent is allocated directly to transit operators within the county. The allocations are based on the operator’s share of revenues as compared with the revenues for all operators in the state. State of California— Transportation Development Act State Participation: 100% Program Funding: • Local Transpor- tation Fund: $1,141,840,000 (FY09/10) • State Transit Assistance Fund: $400,000,000 (FY10/11) Distribution Method: Allocation of Sales Tax Revenues Regulatory Reference: Transportation Develop- ment Act of 1971, aka Mills–Alquist–Deddeh Act (SB 325) Administering Agency: TPA Local Match: Not needed.

potential Funding Sources 221 TDA mandates public participation and requires the establishment of Social Services Trans- portation Advisory Councils (SSTAC) in each planning area. The councils must represent • Transit users more than 60 years of age • Transit users with disabilities • Two local social services providers for seniors and the handicapped, respectively • A local social service provider for persons of limited means SSTACs participate in annual transit need assessments; develop criteria for allocations and claims; and advise on transportation services, including specialized transportation. TDA requires frequent audits. Fiscal audits are performed yearly and review the transit opera- tor expense-to-revenue ratio, also known as farebox recovery. Performance audits are performed every three years and assess the performance and efficiency of the Transportation Planning Agencies and area transportation operators. Program Definitions: Terms in TDA legislation and rulemaking help with understanding the program. Some of the important terms are (1) Claims for Public Transportation: Claims may be filed with the TPA by operators to support public transportation systems and to aid public transportation research and demonstration projects. (2) Coordination of Services: All operators are encouraged to establish maximum coordination of public transportation services, fares, transfer privileges, and other related matters for the overall improvement of public transportation service to the general public. (3) Operators: The service operator owns or leases the equipment, establishes routes and fre- quency of service, regulates and collects fares, and otherwise controls the efficiency and quality of the system. (4) Public Transportation System: The term means any system of a service operator which pro- vides transportation to the general public by any vehicle which operates on land or water, regardless of whether operated separate from or in conjunction with other vehicles. (5) Transfers Between Operators: Where there are two or more operators within an area of ju- risdiction, the TPA, the county transportation commission, and the San Diego Metropolitan Transit Development Board shall adopt rules and regulations to provide for transfers between the public transportation services of the operators so that such services will be coordinated. Program Contact: Division of Mass Transportation, California Department of Transporta- tion, P.O. Box 942874—MS 39, Room 3300, Sacramento, California 94274. (916) 654-9396. http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/MassTrans/State-TDA.html State of Oklahoma—Job Access and Reverse Commute/New Freedom Grant Program Program Purpose: The Oklahoma Department of Transportation (Oklahoma DOT) receives apportionments from the FTA for implementation of Job Access and Reverse Commute and New Freedom programs. These apportionments are the basis for the state-administered grant program. The purpose is to comply with the state’s Locally Coordinated Public Transit–Human Service Transportation Plan adopted in 2008. Specifically, the purpose is to • Address, with program grants, the issues and gaps in the transportation system for the elderly, persons with disabilities, and low-income populations. • Promote and improve coordination among the existing 62 federal programs offered by 13 federal agencies that sponsor transportation programs. • Oklahoma DOT annually announces availability of funds and a selection process to determine which proposed Oklahoma projects will be awarded. Oklahoma DOT adheres to the local match requirements and eligibility criteria of the federal programs. State of Oklahoma— Job Access and Reverse Commute/ New Freedom Grant Program State Participation: Federal Match Ratios • Program Funding: JARC Apportionment (Program Year 2012) – Small Area: $444,752 – Rural: $1,901,698 • New Freedom Appor- tionment (Program Year 2012) – Small Urban: $288,418 – Rural: $975,842 Distribution Method: Competitive Grant Regulatory Reference: OAC Title 730 Section 45-1-1–45-1-2; Pub.L. 105-178 Administering Agency: Oklahoma DOT—Transit Programs Division Local Match: Not needed.

222 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook Program Eligibility: Eligible applicants are • Private nonprofit organizations • State or local governmental authorities, including tribal governments • Operators of public transportation services, including private operators of public transporta- tion services Other: (1) Grant applications can only be obtained after attendance of a mandatory instructional meeting. Applications are evaluated by an Oklahoma DOT Grant Evaluation Commit- tee with representatives from the Tribal Transportation Advisory Board; the Oklahoma Departments of Commerce, Rehabilitation Services, Human Services and Transportation; the Oklahoma Office of Disabilities Concerns; the Oklahoma Health Care Authority; the Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council; and the Oklahoma Transit Association. (2) Projects are ranked based on criteria mirroring federal criteria. In addition, the Okla- homa DOT process provides a range of points that may be assigned to an application. For example, up to 20 points may be awarded for the proposed method of coordinating services and promoting public awareness of the project. The application must include narrative describing efforts to coordinate with other agencies and how the project will enhance or augment transportation service in the service area. Two points may be awarded for match funds, regardless of source. (3) Grant awardees enter Oklahoma DOT contracts and comply with applicable federal requirements including background certifications and assurances as necessary. Oklahoma DOT submits status reports to FTA including summaries of subrecipient (grantee) activi- ties and description of services including coordination of effort, sustainability, accomplish- ments, and obstacles or barriers. Service statistics such as ridership counts and number of employment sites may be required for reporting. Program Contact: Transit Programs Division, Oklahoma Department of Transportation, Room 3D4, 200 NE 21st Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73105. (405) 521-2584. http://www. okladot.state.ok.us/transit/pubtrans.htm State of Oregon—Special Transportation Fund Program Purpose: The Special Transportation Fund (STF) was created in 1985 by the Oregon Legislature. The program was originally funded with cigarette tax revenue. Today, cigarette taxes are combined with funds from the Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) to support the program. The purpose is to provide a flexible, coordinated, reliable, and continuing source of revenue in support of transportation services for seniors and people with disabilities. The program supports transportation services that enable access to health, education, work, social, and recreational opportunities. Program Eligibility: Originally, 33 transit districts or counties were identified as eligible to receive STF monies. In 2003, nine federally recognized Indian tribes were added as eligible recip- ients. All are referred to as STF agencies. STF funds may be used for any purpose directly related to transportation services includ- ing transit operations, capital equipment, planning, travel training, and other transit-related purposes. After subtracting Oregon DOT administrative costs, STF funds are divided into two accounts, the STF Formula Program and the STF Discretionary Grant Account. • STF Formula Program: Formula funds represent 75 percent of all STF funds. They are entitle- ments to the STF agencies. Each receives either a population-based allocation or a minimum State of Oregon— Special Transportation Fund State Participation: 100% Program Funding: $6,648,182 (FY10 Formula Funds) Distribution Method: Formula and Discretionary Grants Regulatory Reference: ORS 391.800 through 391-830; Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 732 Administering Agency: Oregon DOT—Public Transit Division Local Match: Not needed.

potential Funding Sources 223 allocation, whichever is more. For agencies with less than $38,000 in their population-based share, additional funds from the Discretionary Account are added, up to $38,000. Each agency may request an additional $2,000 for administrative purposes. Agencies must submit an application to claim their allocation. Applications are reviewed by Oregon DOT and an agreement is executed before the funds are disbursed each quarter of the fiscal year. The agencies are responsible for developing their own program policies and procedures. • STF Discretionary Grant Account: Funds remaining after payment of the minimum allocations and administrative allotments are discretionary. These funds are distributed competitively to projects of statewide importance as defined by the Oregon Transportation Commission. Proj- ects funded with STF Discretionary Grant monies are administered through a grant agree- ment between Oregon DOT and the STF agency. Other: (1) Any procedure or process for managing the STF program that meets the requirements of the law is acceptable. There are three different management types: the governing board of the STF agency which directly manages the program; the STF agency which appoints staff to perform day-to-day management; and the STF agency which obtains management sup- port from an outside agency. For example, the Klamath Tribes Tribal Council designates an employee from its human service department to manage the STF program. (2) The STF agency must appoint an advisory committee and consult with it before making fund decisions. The advisory committee must (a) Comply with the agency public involvement policies and the state public meeting laws (b) Meet twice a year, at minimum, to advise the agency and carry out STF purposes (c) Be involved in developing the Agency Coordinated Plan (d) Maintain its bylaws and meeting records and provide them to the public (3) Advisory committee membership should be geographically and culturally diverse and should include (a) A senior or a person with a disability who is a user of transportation services in the dis- trict or county (b) A senior or a person with a disability who lives in an area of the district or county where there are no public transportation services (c) A representative of seniors living in the district or county (d) A representative of people with disabilities living in the district or county (e) A representative of a provider of services to seniors and people with disabilities (4) Tribes must appoint at least three members that are representative of the people being served. Program Contact: Special Transportation Manager, Public Transit Division, Oregon Depart- ment of Transportation, 555 13th Street, NE, Suite 3, Salem, Oregon 97301. (503) 986-3472. http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/PT/PROGRAMS/STF/STFProgram_guidebook_1107.pdf Washington State—Consolidated Grant Program Program Purpose: The Washington State Department of Transportation (Washington State DOT) consolidates its state and federal grant awards under one administrative process. The program consolidates FTA Sections 5310, 5311, 5316 and 5317 grants; State Rural Mobility competitive grants; and State Paratransit and Special Needs competitive grants. The goals of the consolidated grant program are to • Encourage communities to identify and address deficiencies in paratransit, special needs, or rural public transportation and provide funding to address the deficiencies. • Support a sustainable network of transportation services within and between communities. State of Washington— Consolidated Grant Program State Participation: Federal or state match ratios Program Funding: $37,000,000 (FY09/10) Distribution Method: Competitive Grant; Matching Grant Regulatory Reference: WAC Title 468 Administering Agency: Washington State DOT— Public Transportation Division Local Match: Washington State DOT strongly encourages all applicants to provide match.

224 developing, enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook • Establish opportunities for collaboration among local jurisdictions, regional organizations, private sector agencies, state and federal governments, and tribal governments. • Ensure stakeholders have a voice in project development. • Support coordinated services among transportation providers. Program Eligibility: Eligible applicants include urban, small, and rural public transit orga- nizations; private nonprofit organizations; private for-profit transportation providers; tribal governments; and other general or local governments. Capital grants cover • Purchasing buses, vans, and other passenger service vehicles • Refurbishing existing passenger service vehicles • Retrofitting vehicles for wheelchair lifts • Replacement parts for passenger service vehicles • Radios and communications equipment • Computer hardware and software including dispatching software and data systems • Equipment for new technologies that enhance public transportation operations, mobility, and access • Other equipment such as bicycle racks and fare boxes • Pre-owned or used wheelchair-accessible passenger service vehicles • Bus shelters • Maintenance equipment, such as bus lifts and specialized diagnostic tools • Security equipment • Mobility management, such as hardware or software purchases • Purchase of service Operating grants may be used for expenses such as labor, supplies, and fuel. They cannot be used for the depreciation of vehicles purchased with federal or state dollars or for expenses incurred outside of the grant period. Operating grants cover • Operating assistance for rural public transportation services • Operating assistance for paratransit and special needs transportation services • Feeder bus service for the intercity network • Mobility management • Travel trainer Other: (1) Washington State DOT makes the determination on type of funding award and amount. Awards occur every 2 years. (2) Projects with local match that demonstrate local commitment are more likely to be funded. (3) A separate application is required for each type of request—capital, operating, or program development. Multiple projects of the same type may be included in one application. (4) Applicants are expected to be participants in the Regional Transportation Planning Organi- zation (RTPO) or Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO). They are required to have or participate in a Coordinated Public Transit–Human Services Transportation Plan and coordinate with other providers in their area. Program Contact: Public Transportation Division, Washington State Department of Trans- portation, PO Box 47387, Olympia, Washington 98504. (360) 705-7922. www.wsdot.wa.gov/ transit and http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/18BA5959-6F79-47FA-96CE-4E0F861884 86/0/201113ApplicationPacket.pdf

Abbreviations and acronyms used without definitions in TRB publications: AAAE American Association of Airport Executives AASHO American Association of State Highway Officials AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials ACI–NA Airports Council International–North America ACRP Airport Cooperative Research Program ADA Americans with Disabilities Act APTA American Public Transportation Association ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials ATA American Trucking Associations CTAA Community Transportation Association of America CTBSSP Commercial Truck and Bus Safety Synthesis Program DHS Department of Homeland Security DOE Department of Energy EPA Environmental Protection Agency FAA Federal Aviation Administration FHWA Federal Highway Administration FMCSA Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration FRA Federal Railroad Administration FTA Federal Transit Administration HMCRP Hazardous Materials Cooperative Research Program IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISTEA Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 ITE Institute of Transportation Engineers NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAO National Association of State Aviation Officials NCFRP National Cooperative Freight Research Program NCHRP National Cooperative Highway Research Program NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration NTSB National Transportation Safety Board PHMSA Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration RITA Research and Innovative Technology Administration SAE Society of Automotive Engineers SAFETEA-LU Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (2005) TCRP Transit Cooperative Research Program TEA-21 Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (1998) TRB Transportation Research Board TSA Transportation Security Administration U.S.DOT United States Department of Transportation

Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook Get This Book
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TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 154: Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: A Guidebook offers guidance about the various steps for planning and implementing a tribal transit system. The steps that are described may be used for planning a new transit system, enhancing an existing service, or taking action to sustain services.

The report also provides an overview of the tribal transit planning process.

The project that developed TCRP Report 154 also produced TCRP Web Document 54: Developing, Enhancing, and Sustaining Tribal Transit Services: Final Research Report, which documents the development of the TCRP Report 154.

In addition, the project also produced a 16-page full-color brochure, published in 2011 as "Native Americans on the Move: Challenges and Successes", with an accompanying PowerPoint presentation; and a PowerPoint presentation describing the entire project.

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