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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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F Committee Biosketches

Donald M. Berwick, M.D., M.P.P., FRCP (Chair), is president emeritus and senior fellow, Institute for Healthcare Improvement, and is also former Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. A pediatrician by background, Dr. Berwick has served on the faculty of the Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, and on the staffs of Boston’s Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He has also served as vice chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the first “Independent Member” of the American Hospital Association Board of Trustees, and chair of the National Advisory Council of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. He served two terms on the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Governing Council, was a member of the IOM’s Global Health Board, and served on President Clinton’s Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in the Healthcare Industry. Recognized as a leading authority on health care quality and improvement, Dr. Berwick has received numerous awards for his contributions. In 2005, he was appointed Honorary Knight Commander of the British Empire by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in recognition of his work with the British National Health Service. Dr. Berwick is the author or co-author of more than 160 scientific articles and 6 books.

Ellen P. Embrey, is managing partner of Stratitia, Inc., and 2c4 Technologies, Inc. Stratitia is a strategy and management consulting firm specializing in supporting clients that serve the health care, national security, and information technology sectors, and 2c4 Technologies specializes

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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in providing health sector information technology (IT) solutions and services. Ms. Embrey also is a counselor in The Cohen Group, a firm that provides global business consulting services and advice on tactical and strategic opportunities in virtually every market. She has extensive executive and program leadership experience in the executive branch of the federal government. In her last federal role, she served as the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) and the director, TRICARE Management Activity, during the presidential transition period in 2009-2010. In that capacity, she led and managed the Military Health System, a $47 billion/year defense health program employing more than 200,000 health professionals serving more than 9.6 million service members, retirees, and their families in more than 70 hospitals and 500 clinics and laboratories around the globe. As Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Force Health Protection and Readiness) from 2002 to 2009, Ms. Embrey orchestrated significant improvements in U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) policies and programs, affecting deployment and combat casualty medicine, health promotion and preventive medicine, medical readiness, and public health emergency preparedness and response. As DoD’s “line of action” lead for addressing traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), she led collaborative efforts to identify gaps and prioritize investments in TBI and PTSD research, align clinical best practices of DoD and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and establish new U.S. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition (ICD-9) codes for TBI diagnoses and treatment based on DoD/VA experience. At the Secretary of Defense’s request, Ms. Embrey led a landmark study of sexual assault in the military, making recommendations that led to widespread reforms across the department. Throughout 2001, during the presidential transition period, Ms. Embrey served as the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs, shaping policies affecting the readiness and use of the National Guard and Reserve in both federal and state status. From 2000 to 2001, she served as Chief of Staff of that office, and from 1998 to 2001, as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Assistance to Civil Authorities, developing policies that shaped the role of the National Guard and Reserve components in supporting homeland security, disaster preparedness, and national disaster response capabilities, including advising the President on such matters in the days and weeks following September 11, 2001. Over her distinguished 35-year federal career, Ms. Embrey received many awards, the highest of which include two Secretary of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Awards and two Presidential Meritorious Executive Rank Awards.

Sara Goldkind, M.D., M.A., is currently an independent research and clinical bioethics consultant with Goldkind Consulting, LLC. In this capacity,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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her work includes consulting on novel therapies, innovative clinical trial designs and product development in special settings (e.g., research involving pregnant women, pediatric populations, decisionally impaired subjects, rare diseases, international research, emergency research); advising on and developing human research protections programs and institutional review boards; and regulatory compliance. Since leaving the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), she serves as a special government expert for the FDA, a member of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Ethics Committee, as well as a member of various data monitoring committees at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Goldkind is a nationally recognized expert on clinical research ethics, and is the former senior bioethicist at the FDA within the Office of the Commissioner. In this position, she served as an agency expert for medical ethics and participated in the planning, management, and implementation of bioethics activities and policies across the FDA. These activities included ethics consultations both within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and for industry; guidance and policy development; educational programming; and evaluation of the ethical aspects of research involving human subjects, including clinical trial oversight. Dr. Goldkind came to the FDA in 2003. Previously, she was involved in clinical consultative ethics, policy development, and education in both the clinical setting and academia. She is a board-certified internist. Dr. Goldkind completed a fellowship in clinical medical ethics and obtained a master’s degree in religious studies focusing on comparative religious ethics and public policy at the University of South Florida School of Medicine, where she was on the faculty in the Department of Medicine.

Adil H. Haider, M.D., M.P.H., FACS, is a clinically active trauma surgeon; widely published researcher; and the Kessler Director for the Center for Surgery and Public Health, a joint initiative of Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), Harvard Medical School, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Haider’s research focuses on long-term clinical and functional outcomes after trauma, race and gender disparities in health care, optimal treatment of trauma/critically ill patients in resource-poor settings, and advanced analytics for outcomes research using large databases. Crucial to this report, in 2013 he led a team of researchers that conducted a nationwide survey on the impact of contemporary military practices on civilian trauma care, identifying successes and barriers in translating the military’s experience to the civilian setting. As an internationally renowned trauma outcomes researcher he has been the lead author of multiple research methods publications including best practices for using National Trauma Data Bank data. He is also the principal investigator (PI) of a joint project with the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences (USUHS) that uses military TRICARE claims data from more than 8 million patients to study

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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comparative effectiveness of various interventions, epidemiology and practice patterns, potential health care disparities, wounded warrior care, and health policy issues important to our military health system. In 2015, Dr. Haider served as the Organizing Secretary for the first-ever summit on the science of surgical disparities, hosted by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) and the American College of Surgeons (ACS) that has led to the recently announced National Agenda for Surgical Disparities Research. He is also the PI for the groundbreaking EQUALITY (Emergency Department QUery for Patient-Centered Approaches to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity) Study, which is focused on developing patient-centered approaches to collect sexual orientation and gender identity information in emergency departments. Dr. Haider’s work has been recognized with more than two dozen major awards, including the prestigious Joan and Julius Promising Investigator Award from the ACS. His leadership positions include deputy editor of JAMA Surgery, recorder and program committee chair for the Association for Academic Surgery, vice chair for the ACS Committee on Health Care Disparities, and several committee membership positions in both the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma and the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma. Dr. Haider has formally mentored more than 100 research trainees, published more than 175 peer-reviewed papers, and currently serves as PI on extramural grants worth more than $7 million. Dr. Haider believes that equality is the cornerstone of medicine, and his professional goal is to ensure that all patients receive the highest-quality patient-centered care.

COL (ret) John Bradley Holcomb, M.D., FACS, has been a leader in trauma surgery and related research at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston since his 2008 retirement from the Army. He serves as director of the Center for Translational Injury Research, professor and vice chair of the Department of Surgery, and as the Jack H. Mayfield, M.D., Chair in Surgery. In 1993, MAJ Holcomb was deployed with U.S. Special Operations Forces to Somalia, where he cared for soldiers who had been severely wounded on the battlefield of Mogadishu in the violent Black Hawk Down episode. The experience had a profound impact, spurring his decision to dedicate his career to trauma surgery and research aimed at improving outcomes for the injured. In 1997, Dr. Holcomb became chief of the Military Trauma Research Branch of the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research. In 1999, LTC Holcomb established the U.S. Department of Defense’s (DoD’s) first Joint Trauma Training Center in Houston, Texas, focused on preparing physicians, nurses, and medics to deploy into a combat zone and optimally care for combat casualties. In 2001, he completed a surgical critical care fellowship at the University of Texas at Houston while serving as trauma

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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advisor to the U.S. Special Operations Command. From 2002 until his retirement from the military in 2008, he served as both commander of the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research and trauma consultant to the Army Surgeon General. Because of his leadership, the military began issuing lifesaving tourniquets to every member of the U.S. Armed Forces deployed in combat zones. Dr. Holcomb initiated the use of hemostatic dressings in place of gauze dressings to stem bleeding more effectively and introduced major advances in resuscitation (damage control resuscitation). For these initiatives, he was the recipient of three Army Greatest Invention awards. Most importantly, COL Holcomb led the efforts to establish the Joint Theater Trauma System and the first DoD Trauma Registry. His achievements and dedication to servicemen and -women earned him numerous military honors, including the Honorary Medal for Combat Surgical Care, the Army’s Development Achievement Award for Leadership and Excellence, and the U.S. Special Forces Command Medal. In 2008, Dr. Holcomb received the American Heart Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in Trauma Resuscitation Science and the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma Service Award for outstanding scientific contributions to the surgery of trauma and dedication to the care of wounded warriors.

Brent C. James, M.D., M.Stat., is the chief quality officer and executive director, Institute for Health Care Delivery Research, at Intermountain Healthcare. Intermountain is an integrated system of 22 hospitals, more than 185 freestanding clinics, a 1,300+ member physician group, and an HMO/PPO insurance plan jointly responsible for more than 850,000 covered lives serving patients in Utah, Idaho, and, at a tertiary level, seven surrounding states. Dr. James is known internationally for his work in clinical quality improvement; patient safety; and the infrastructure that underlies successful improvement efforts, such as culture change, data systems, payment methods, and management roles. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (and participated in many of that organization’s seminal works on quality and patient safety). He was recently recognized for his pioneering work in applying quality improvement techniques originally developed by W. Edwards Deming and others and awarded the 2011 Deming Cup. The award is given annually to an individual who has made outstanding contributions in the area of operations and has established a culture of continuous improvement within his or her respective organization. Dr. James was instrumental in helping to create and implement a “system” model at Intermountain in which physicians study process and outcomes data to determine the types of care that are most effective. He holds faculty appointments at the Stanford University School of Medicine (Department of Medicine), the University of Utah School of Medicine (Family Medicine and Biomedical Informatics), Harvard School of Public Health

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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(Health Policy and Management), and the University of Sydney, Australia, School of Public Health. Through the Intermountain Advanced Training Program in Clinical Practice Improvement, he has trained more than 5,000 senior physician, nursing, and administrative executives from around the world in clinical management methods, with proven improvement results (and more than 50 “daughter” training programs in 10 countries). Before coming to Intermountain, he was an assistant professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health, providing statistical support for the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group; and staffed the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer. He holds B.S. degrees in computer science (electrical engineering) and medical biology; an M.D. degree (with residency training in general surgery and oncology); and a master of statistics degree. Dr. James serves on several nonprofit boards of trustees dedicated to clinical improvement.

Jorie Klein, R.N., is the director of nursing at the Rees-Jones Trauma Center at Parkland. She is the current chair of Texas Governor’s EMS, Trauma Advisory Council’s Trauma System Committee. In addition, she is the vice chair of the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. She is the board chair for the Texas EMS, Trauma and Acute Care Foundation and a past president of the Society of Trauma Nurses (STN) and is a current member of the STN Trauma Outcomes Performance Improvement Course (TOPIC) committee and Advanced Trauma Course for Nurses (ATCN) committee. She is an instructor for the TOPIC Course and the ATCN course as well as the Region VI chair for STN. In addition, she is an instructor for the Disaster Management Emergency Preparedness Course sponsored by the American College of Surgeons. Ms. Klein is an appointed STN liaison to the ACS Performance Improvement Patient Safety Committee. She is an emeritus board member for the Trauma Center Association of American and the course coordinator for the Trauma Center Leadership Course and the Trauma System Leadership Course. She is a founding member of the Texas Trauma Coordinators Forum.

Douglas Kupas, M.D., serves as the associate chief academic officer for Simulation and Medical Education for Geisinger Health System, where he also practices as an emergency physician. He is board certified in emergency medicine and the subspecialty of emergency medical services (EMS). He is also assistant dean for Student Affairs at the Geisinger campus for Temple University School of Medicine. Dr. Kupas completed his emergency medicine residency program at Geisinger Medical Center, his graduate degree at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, and his undergraduate degree at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of numerous local, state, and national organizations and has

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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many honors, awards, and publications to his credit. He remains active in his field of research. Dr. Kupas is a paramedic and has been an active field EMS provider since 1980. He also serves as the Commonwealth EMS Director for the Bureau of Emergency Medical Services for the Pennsylvania Department of Health, and is former chair of the Medical Directors Council of the National Association of EMS Officials, the Mobile Integrated Healthcare/Community Paramedicine Committee of the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP), the Standards and Practices Committee of NAEMSP, and the Rural EMS Committee of NAEMSP. His clinical and research interests include EMS medical direction, EMS provider and patient safety, field trauma triage, emergency airway management, therapeutic hypothermia, wilderness EMS, and simulation in medical education. Dr. Kupas directs the ARCTIC (Advanced Resuscitation Cooling Therapies in Cardiac Arrest) program at Geisinger Health System, and partnered with the HeartRescue project to advance statewide out-of-hospital cardiac arrest care in Pennsylvania. Additionally, he was involved in writing a national position statement on patient restraint that guided the development of protocols for EMS operations nationwide. He also participated in evidence-based reviews for the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation that drafts the guidelines used by the American Heart Association and other resuscitation groups around the world and for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American College of Surgeons field trauma triage guidelines. Dr. Kupas has served as state EMS medical director for Pennsylvania since 2000, and during that time he led the process of developing statewide EMS protocols. He also participated in projects to develop and implement national evidence-based guidelines for EMS.

Cato T. Laurencin, M.D., Ph.D., is the Albert and Wilda Van Dusen Distinguished Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Connecticut (UConn). Dr. Laurencin is the founder and director of both the Institute for Regenerative Engineering and the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Center for Biomedical, Biological, Physical and Engineering Sciences at UConn. He also serves as Chief Executive Officer of the Connecticut Institute for Clinical and Translational Science at UConn. For his outstanding achievements in medicine, engineering, and science, and for his distinguished service to the university, UConn named him a University Professor. He is the 8th in UConn’s 130-year history. Dr. Laurencin earned his B.S.E. in chemical engineering from Princeton University and his M.D., Magna Cum Laude, from the Harvard Medical School. He simultaneously earned his Ph.D. in biochemical engineering/biotechnology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he was a Hugh Hampton Young Fellow. Dr. Laurencin’s

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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work in science focuses on biomaterials, nanotechnology, drug delivery, stem cell science, and a new field he has pioneered—regenerative engineering. In 2012, his work was highlighted by National Geographic Magazine in its edition, “100 Scientific Discoveries That Changed the World.” Dr. Laurencin’s work is funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where he is a recipient of a 2014 NIH Pioneer Award for his work in regenerative engineering. A practicing shoulder and knee surgeon, Dr. Laurencin is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, a Fellow of the American Surgical Association, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. He won the Nicolas Andry Award from the Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons. He has been listed in America’s Top DoctorsTM continuously for the past decade. A Fellow of the American Chemical Society, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Materials Research Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Dr. Laurencin is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and served as the Chair of the College of Fellows. He is an International Fellow in Biomaterials Science and Engineering and served on the Council of the Society for Biomaterials. He is a Fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society and has been a member of the Board of Directors. Dr. Laurencin received the Presidential Faculty Fellowship Award from President Clinton in recognition of his research work bridging medicine and engineering. In 2009, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers named him 1 of the 100 Engineers of the Modern Era at its centennial celebration. In 2014, he received the Percy Julian Medal from the National Organization of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers at its annual meeting. Dr. Laurencin has been active in service to our nation. He has served on the National Science Advisory Board of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the National Science Foundation’s Engineering Advisory Committee (ADCOM), the NIH Advisory Council for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, and the NIH Advisory Council for Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. At the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine he has served as co-chair of the Clinical Effectiveness Research Innovation Collaborative as a member of the Academies Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care. Dr. Laurencin is an outstanding mentor. He has received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring from President Barack Obama in ceremonies at the White House, the Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman Award for Mentoring, the Alvin H. Crawford Mentoring Award from the J. Robert Gladden Orthopaedic Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Mentor Award. Dr. Laurencin is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Engineering. Internationally, he is an elected Fellow of the African Acad-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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emy of Sciences and an elected Fellow of the World Academy of Sciences. Dr. Laurencin is a recipient of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation in ceremonies at the White House.

Ellen MacKenzie, Ph.D., is the Fred and Julie Soper Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and director of the Major Extremity Trauma Research Consortium, dedicated to advancing limb trauma care and outcomes through research. She is a graduate of the School of Public Health, where she earned M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in biostatistics. She joined the Hopkins faculty in 1980 and holds joint appointments in the school’s Department of Biostatistics and the departments of Emergency Medicine and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. In addition to her faculty appointments, Dr. MacKenzie served as senior associate dean at the school from 1996 to 2000 and director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy from 1995 to 2005. Dr. MacKenzie completed a term as chair of the National Advisory Committee for Injury Prevention and Control and was past president of the American Trauma Society. Her research focuses on the impact of health services and policies on the short- and long-term consequences of traumatic injury, with special emphasis on orthopaedic trauma outcomes. She has contributed to the development and evaluation of tools for measuring both the severity and outcomes of injury, and her research has advanced understanding of both the clinical and nonclinical factors that influence recovery post-injury. Dr. MacKenzie was co-principal investigator on the Lower Extremity Assessment Project (LEAP) study and the METALS study. She was also principal investigator on the National Study on the Costs and Outcomes of Trauma Care (NSCOT). Some of her more recent efforts include the development and evaluation of self-management programs for survivors of serious trauma. Her awards include the A.J. Mirkin Service Award from the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine, the Kappa Delta Award from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (for the LEAP Study), Distinguished Career Awards from the American Public Health Association and the American Trauma Society, and the Trauma Leadership Award from the Society of Trauma Nurses. She is also an honorary fellow of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma and in 2012, she was named by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as 1 of 20 leaders and visionaries who have had a transformative effect on the field of violence and injury prevention over the past 20 years.

David Marcozzi, M.D., MHS-CL, FACEP, is an associate professor and the director of Population Health in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Prior to this academic role,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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he served in the federal government as a senior leader and subject matter expert on health delivery, emergency care, and emergency preparedness. During his federal tenure, Dr. Marcozzi held positions in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the White House. As the senior advisor for emergency preparedness and acute care in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Dr. Marcozzi was involved with health delivery reform efforts and clinical quality standards and measures development. Before being asked to assume this role, he served as director of the National Healthcare Preparedness Programs within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR). Dr. Marcozzi returned to HHS in September 2011 after completing a 3-year detail to the White House National Security Council, where he served as director of All-Hazards Medical Preparedness Policy. During his time at the White House, he led multiple sub-interagency policy committees and assisted in responding to several events of national significance. Before his detail to the White House in 2008, he created and directed the Emergency Care Coordination Center, an office within HHS established to improve prehospital and hospital-based emergency care. Prior to his federal positions, Dr. Marcozzi completed a congressional fellowship at the U.S. Senate. Serving on the Bioterrorism and Public Health Preparedness Subcommittee, he assisted in drafting the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act that became law in 2006. A lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves, Dr. Marcozzi has been mobilized four times since 2001 and is now assigned to the U.S. Army Special Operations Command as a deputy surgeon. As a member of the National Disaster Medical System, he responded to multiple disasters, including the September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center. The author of several articles and scientific manuscripts, he is also the recipient of numerous military and civilian awards including the National Security Council Outstanding Achievement Award, a Certificate of Appreciation from the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counter-terrorism, the Army Commendation Medal, the National Disaster Medical System Distinguished Member Award, and the Duke Emergency Medicine Distinguished Faculty Award.

C. Joseph McCannon, is co-founder and CEO of the Billions Institute. Previously, he was an appointee in the Obama administration, serving as senior advisor to the administrator at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). There he rolled out major pieces of the Affordable Care Act and was part of the founding leadership team at the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation (CMMI), directing its Learning and Diffusion Group. Prior to joining CMS, he was vice president and faculty in large-scale improvement at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), leading the organiza-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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tion’s major domestic initiative to improve patient safety, the 100,000 Lives Campaign, and initiating its work in Africa. Mr. McCannon has supported large-scale transformation in several nations, including Canada, Denmark, England, Japan, and South Africa, and consulted on the topic for a number of organizations, including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the World Health Organization, and Community Solutions (100,000 Homes Campaign). He started his career in the publishing industry with roles at Fast Company, The Atlantic Monthly, and Outside magazine. He is a graduate of Harvard University and was a Reuters fellow at Stanford University.

Norman E. McSwain, Jr., M.D., FACS, was professor of surgery and trauma director, Interim Louisiana State University Public Hospital and police surgeon for the New Orleans Police Department. Dr. McSwain attended college at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee, and medical school at the University of Alabama. He then joined the Air Force and later went into private practice before joining the clinical and academic faculty at the University of Kansas in Kansas City, where he assumed responsibility for emergency medical services (EMS) education and system development for the state of Kansas. When he was recruited 4 years later to Tulane University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, and Charity Hospital, 90 percent of the population of Kansas was covered by paramedic quality care within 10 minutes, and 1 of every 500 Kansans (including the entire Kansas Highway Patrol) were trained as an emergency medical technician (EMT)-basic. Dr. McSwain joined the academic and clinical faculty at Tulane, but his main interest was in Charity Hospital, prehospital patient care, and trauma and general surgery patients. He was recruited by the city of New Orleans to develop an EMS system for the city. He initiated both EMT-Basic and EMT-Paramedic training within the New Orleans Police Department and a city-wide EMS system. During this time, he was recruited to the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACS COT) to assist in the development of the Advanced Trauma Life Support program, and worked with the ACS COT and the National Association of EMTs to develop the Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program. Today, PHTLS has trained more than 1 million people in 67 countries and is considered the world standard for prehospital trauma care. Dr. McSwain also worked with the military and the U.S. Department of Defense to develop the tactical combat casualty care program for military medics. For 30 years, he provided care to severely injured police officers and other patients at the Spirit of Charity Center. Dr. McSwain wrote or revised more than 25 textbooks, published more than 360 articles, and traveled throughout the world giving more than 800 presentations. He is the only person in the history of the ACS to receive all five major trauma awards.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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John A. Parrish, M.D., is chief executive officer and founder of the Consortia for Improving Medicine with Innovation and Technology (CIMIT), a consortium of academic and engineering research laboratories, universities, and more than 40 private-sector companies. Through CIMIT, clinical investigators work to advance the standards of care for all patients through the development and the adoption of targeted medical devices and technologies. Trained in internal medicine, dermatology, and clinical research, Dr. Parrish has been recognized as a visionary and innovator whose accomplishments include the development of therapies to treat skin disease, including the now-common use of ultraviolet light. For two decades, he served as chief of the Department of Dermatology at Massachusetts General Hospital, founding the Wellman Center for Photomedicine, the first—and now the world’s largest—multidisciplinary research group to study the effects of lasers on tissue. A graduate of Duke University and Yale University School of Medicine, Dr. Parrish is the author or co-author of more than 300 publications, including 6 books. Dr. Parrish has earned the Discovery Award from the National Dermatology Foundation; the Bowditch Prize from Massachusetts General Hospital for enhancing the quality of patient care while reducing the cost of that care; the U.S. Army’s Thurman Award, honoring the late GEN Maxwell Reid Thurman, who championed the advancement of lifesaving medical technologies within the U.S. Army; and the 2011 Humanitarian Award, for his wide-ranging lifetime professional contributions to the field of dermatology. Dr. Parrish proudly served in the United States Marine Corps and was a battlefield doctor in Vietnam. As a result, he is acutely aware of the needs of soldiers and their supportive medical units. He is the founding director of the Boston Red Sox Foundation–Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program, a novel public–private partnership aimed at helping veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq who are affected by posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. Dr. Parrish is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Rita Redberg, M.D., FACC, M.Sc., has been a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco since 1990. She is currently the chief editor of JAMA Internal Medicine (formerly Archives of Internal Medicine). Her research interests are in the area of health policy and technology assessment; her work includes comparative effectiveness research and focuses on how evidence relates to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, insurance coverage, and medical guidelines and practice. Dr. Redberg is a member of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission that advises Congress on Medicare payment policy. She has chaired the Medicare Evidence, Development and Coverage Advisory Commission since 2012 and also served as a member from 2003 to 2006.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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Dr. Redberg was recently appointed to the Clinical Advisory Panel for the California Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) Outcomes Reporting Program where she joins several other Institute for Health Policy Studies (IHPS) faculty. She currently is a member of the California Technology Assessment Forum, the Medical Policy Technology and Advisory Committee, and the FDA Cardiovascular Devices Expert Panel. She also is a consultant to the Center for Medical Technology Policy. She and Sanket Dhruva recently completed an extensive review of the FDA Cardiovascular Device pre-market approval process including issues related to gender bias and has ongoing work looking at post-market surveillance of medical devices, including collaborations with the Pew Charitable Trusts and the FDA. In addition, Dr. Redberg is a member of the American College of Cardiology’s (ACC’s) Clinical Quality Committee, serves on the ACC Quality in Technology Work Group, is a member of the ACC Comparative Effectiveness Work Group, represents the ACC on the Institute of Clinical and Economic Review Advisory Board, and serves on other ACC committees, including several on appropriate use of cardiac imaging and radiation safety. She was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Learning Health Care Committee and has chaired the American Heart Association (AHA)/ACC Writing Group on Primary Prevention Performance Measures. Dr. Redberg graduated from Cornell University and holds an M.S. in health policy and administration from the London School of Economics. She earned her medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Uwe E. Reinhardt, Ph.D., is professor of economics and public affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University. Recognized as one of the nation’s leading authorities on health care economics, he has been a member of the National Academy of Medicine since 1978 and is past president of the Association of Health Services Research. From 1986 to 1995, he served as a commissioner on the Physician Payment Review Committee, established in 1986 by Congress to advise it on issues related to the payment of physicians. He is a senior associate of the Judge Institute for Management of Cambridge University, and a trustee of Duke University and the Duke University Health System. Dr. Reinhardt is or was a member of numerous editorial boards, among them the Journal of Health Economics, the Milbank Memorial Quarterly, Health Affairs, the New England Journal of Medicine, and the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Reinhardt is a prominent scholar in health care economics and a frequent speaker and author on subjects ranging from the war in Iraq to the future of Medicare. His most recent research has focused on hospital pricing, systems of health care around the world, Medicare reform, and health care spending. His work has appeared in Health Affairs, the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, and the British

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
×

Medical Journal. His previous work on hospitals examined the tax and cost of equity capital advantages of not-for-profit hospitals over for-profit hospitals. Dr. Reinhardt’s scholarship has often analyzed the U.S. health care industry in relation to systems around the world. In 2003, he and 14 other prominent health policy experts and private health care industry leaders signed an open letter arguing that Medicare should lead the U.S. health care industry in paying for performance by tying financial reimbursement to quality measures. In addition to his university duties, Dr. Reinhardt has been active as an advisor for government, nonprofit organizations, and private industry and has held directorships in various for-profit companies in the health industry. He served on the Governing Council of the Institute of Medicine between 1979 and 1982, following election to the Institute in 1978, where he has served on a number of study panels, including the Committee on the Implications of For-Profit Medicine, the Committee on Technical Innovation in Medicine, the Committee on the Implications of a Physicians Surplus, and the Committee on the U.S. Physician Supply. In 1996, he was appointed to the Board of Health Care Services of the Institute. From 1986 to 1995, he served three consecutive terms as a commissioner on the Physician Payment Review Commission. Dr. Reinhardt also serves as a commissioner for the Kaiser Family Foundation Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured.

James Robinson, MA(C), EMT-P, currently serves as assistant chief for Denver Health EMS. He is the immediate past president and a founding member of the International Association of EMS Chiefs, and a director at large for the National EMS Memorial Foundation. Chief Robinson began his emergency medical services (EMS) career as a volunteer emergency medical technician (EMT) in 1989, and in 1993 went on to a professional career with the city and county of Denver as a field paramedic. Since then, he has been involved in every facet of the Denver Health Paramedic Division’s operations, and has been an assistant chief since 2005. Chief Robinson is involved in numerous local-, regional-, state-, and national-level EMS, public health, and emergency management initiatives, serving as chairman of the Denver Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI)/Colorado North Central All-Hazards Region’s EMS subcommittee, as an EMS representative to the State of Colorado All-Hazards Advisory Committee, and member of the State of Colorado’s Public Health and Medical Advisory Committee. He has served as the Denver Metro Region 3 Board of Directors’ representative to the Emergency Medical Services Association of Colorado, as a member of the George Washington University National EMS Preparedness Initiative summits, as a member of the Systems Subcommittee of the National EMS Advisory Council, and as a member of the Department of Homeland Security Interagency Board Active Shooter Working Group. Chief Robinson

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
×

holds a B.S., magna cum laude, in human services from Metropolitan State University of Denver and is a graduate of Cohort 6 of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and the Harvard School of Public Health’s National Preparedness Leadership Initiative. He is currently a master’s degree candidate in the Naval Postgraduate School’s Center for Homeland Defense and Security Master’s Degree Program.

Thomas M. Scalea, M.D., began his career at the Kings County Hospital/Downstate Medical Center, where he became chief of Trauma and Critical Care and rose to the rank of professor. He also founded the Department of Emergency Medicine at Downstate. In 1997, Dr. Scalea became the physician-in-chief at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland, the nation’s only freestanding trauma hospital. He later became the first medical school endowed professor of trauma, the Honorable Senator Francis X. Kelly Distinguished Professor in Trauma Surgery. Dr. Scalea is also the system chief for Critical Care Services at the University of Maryland Medical System. His faculty cares for all acute care surgery patients at the University of Maryland Medical Center and he is administratively in charge of many nontrauma intensive care units (ICUs). He is currently creating a critical care network linking ICUs across the state. Shock Trauma also houses the nation’s largest Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) surgical critical care training program, as well as the largest American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST)-approved acute care surgery fellowships. In 2001, Dr. Scalea established the U.S. Air Force C-STARS (Center for Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills) program, which has trained approximately 4,000 Air Force men and women prior to deployment to Afghanistan or Iraq. In 2008 and 2011, Dr. Scalea traveled to Afghanistan and Iraq, respectively, to observe the wounded warrior care system in the field, provide unbiased recommendations for improving the system, and determine how to continually refine trauma training. He also served as a senior visiting surgeon at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, providing care for injured soldiers as they were evacuated from Iraq. He is the immediate past president of the AAST and the Western Trauma Association.

C. William Schwab, M.D., FACS, FRCS, is currently professor of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1987, Dr. Schwab established a Level I Regional Resource Trauma Center, a Surgical Critical Care Service, the PennSTAR Flight Program, and the Communications Center at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. Today, his surgical practice focuses on caring for the severely injured patient and developing regional trauma and emergency care systems. He is one of the first traumatologists to study the effects of trauma in the elderly patient. In addition, Dr. Schwab

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
×

is active in the field of violence prevention and continues to teach trauma surgeons how to become leaders in the public health effort to reduce firearm-related injuries. He also directs the University of Pennsylvania Trauma Network, administrating and coordinating several centers throughout eastern Pennsylvania with Penn’s Level I trauma center to enhance the quality of trauma and emergency care. In addition, he directs the fellowship program in trauma surgery and critical care at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, a program with 10 trainees annually and more than 70 graduates located throughout the world. Dr. Schwab received his medical degree from the State University of New York. During medical school, he joined the U.S. Navy and he performed his residency during the Vietnam War at the Naval Regional Medical Center in Portsmouth, Virginia.

Phillip Spinella, M.D., is an associate professor and the director of the Critical Care Translational Research program at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He has authored approximately 100 manuscripts/chapters and has been an invited speaker at more than 100 institutions globally on the topic of traumatic hemorrhagic shock. A well-established investigator, having been awarded ~$20 million from the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), he is primary investigator for two randomized controlled trials: Age of Blood in Children in Pediatric Intensive Care Units (ABC-PICU), examining effects of red blood cell storage age on outcomes in critically ill children, and Tranexamic Acid Mechanisms and Pharmacokinetics in Traumatic Injury (TAMPITI), examining immunologic effects of tranexamic acid in adults with severe traumatic injuries. Dr. Spinella served 15 years in the U.S. Army, separating as lieutenant colonel. As a veteran of the Iraq war, he received a Bronze Star, Combat Medic Badge and the U.S. Army’s Best Invention Award for the concept of “damage control resuscitation.” He has previously served as consultant to the U.S. Army Blood Research Program at the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the Public Health Service–Northeast Region, and the Norwegian Navy Blood Research Program. He is co-founder and chair of the Pediatric Critical Care Blood Research Network and the Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research Network, international multidisciplinary networks focused on improving outcomes for patients with shock or coagulopathy.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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×
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×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23511.
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Advances in trauma care have accelerated over the past decade, spurred by the significant burden of injury from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Between 2005 and 2013, the case fatality rate for United States service members injured in Afghanistan decreased by nearly 50 percent, despite an increase in the severity of injury among U.S. troops during the same period of time. But as the war in Afghanistan ends, knowledge and advances in trauma care developed by the Department of Defense (DoD) over the past decade from experiences in Afghanistan and Iraq may be lost. This would have implications for the quality of trauma care both within the DoD and in the civilian setting, where adoption of military advances in trauma care has become increasingly common and necessary to improve the response to multiple civilian casualty events.

Intentional steps to codify and harvest the lessons learned within the military’s trauma system are needed to ensure a ready military medical force for future combat and to prevent death from survivable injuries in both military and civilian systems. This will require partnership across military and civilian sectors and a sustained commitment from trauma system leaders at all levels to assure that the necessary knowledge and tools are not lost.

A National Trauma Care System defines the components of a learning health system necessary to enable continued improvement in trauma care in both the civilian and the military sectors. This report provides recommendations to ensure that lessons learned over the past decade from the military’s experiences in Afghanistan and Iraq are sustained and built upon for future combat operations and translated into the U.S. civilian system.

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