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Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging (2016)

Chapter: Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×

Appendix C

Presentations and Site Visits

FEBRUARY 12, 2015, WASHINGTON, DC

  • Department of Energy-National Nuclear Security Administration Activities Related to Molybdenum-99 Production and Utilization and Progress Toward Eliminating Use of Highly Enriched Uranium: Recommendations for This NAS [National Academy of Sciences] Study. Jeffrey Chamberlin, Director, Office of Conversion, Material Management and Minimization, Department of Energy (DOE)-National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); Rilla Hamilton, Mo-99 Program Director, Office of Conversion, Material Management and Minimization, DOE-NNSA
  • U.S. Nuclear Industry Initiatives for the Development of Molybdenum-99 Production Methods Without Highly Enriched Uranium: Recommendations for This NAS Study. Michael Guastella, Council on Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals
  • International Efforts Related to Molybdenum-99 Production and Utilization and Progress Toward Eliminating Use of Highly Enriched Uranium: Recommendations for This NAS Study. Kevin Charlton, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Nuclear Energy Agency
  • Production of Molybdenum-99 Without Highly Enriched Uranium: Perspectives from the Union of Concerned Scientists and Recommendations for This NAS Study. Ed Lyman, Union of Concerned Scientists
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
  • Perspectives from Professional Societies and Recommendations for This NAS Study. Vasken Dilsizian, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology; Sue Bunning, Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Jeffrey Norenberg, National Association of Nuclear Pharmacies

MAY 11-13, 2015, BURR RIDGE, ILLINOIS

  • Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals. Roy Brown, Senior Director, Strategic Alliances, Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals
  • NorthStar Medical Technologies. James Harvey, Senior VP and Chief Science Officer, NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes LLC
  • SHINE Medical Technologies. Gregory Piefer, Chief Executive Officer, SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.
  • Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Chris Bryan, Irradiations Manager, High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • Argonne National Laboratory. Amanda Youker, Chemist, Nuclear Engineering Division; Sergey Chemerisov, Facility Manager of the Linac and Van de Graaff Accelerator Facility, Nuclear Engineering Division; Peter Tkac, Chemist, Nuclear Engineering Division
  • Los Alamos National Laboratory. Greg Dale, Mo-99 Program Lead and R&D Engineer, Los Alamos National Laboratory
  • Y-12 National Security Complex. John Creasy, Program Manager for Advanced Reactor & Materials Design, Y-12 National Security Complex
  • Savannah River National Laboratory. James Klein, Advisory Engineer, Savannah River National Laboratory
  • University of Missouri Research Reactor Center. Ralph Butler, Director, University of Missouri Research Reactor Center
  • General Atomics. John Saurwein, Project Manager, Reactor-Based Mo-99 Production System Project, General Atomics
  • Nordion, Tom Burnett, President, Medical Isotopes, Nordion

JUNE 2, 2015, CONFERENCE CALL

  • Current and Future Trends of Utilization of Nuclear Cardiology Procedures and Competing Technologies. Dr. Marcelo Di Carli, Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Dr. Robert Gropler, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis Raymond; Dr. Louise Thomson, Cedars-Sinai Los Angeles; Dr. William VanDecker, Temple University Hospital
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×

JULY 22, 2015, CONFERENCE CALL

  • IMV’s Methodology for the 2015 Nuclear Medicine Market Outlook Report. Gail Prochaska, Vice President, IMV Medical Information Division; Lorna Young, Senior Director, Market Research
  • Experts Views on Mo-99 Current and Future Demand. Dr. Victor A. Ferrari, Penn Medicine; Dr. Linda D. Gillam, Atlantic Health System; Dr. Michael H. Picard, Massachusetts General Hospital

AUGUST 12-13, 2015, WASHINGTON, DC

  • Uranium Lease and Take-Back Program. Peter Karcz, Office of Material Management and Minimization (NA-23), National Nuclear Security Administration; Hitesh Nigam, Office of Nuclear Materials Disposition (EM-22), Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management
  • FDA’s Role in Mo-99 Production and Utilization. Eric Duffy, Division Director, Office of New Drug Products, Office of Pharmaceutical Quality, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration
  • U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensing Activities Related to Molybdenum-99 Production. Steven Lynch, Project Manager, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
  • EU Observatory on the Supply of Medical Radioisotopes. Remigiusz Barańczyk, Head of Nuclear Fuel Market Observatory Sector, Euratom Supply Agency
  • TechneLite® Generators Manufactured with LEU-based Mo-99. Ira Goldman, Senior Director, Global Strategic Supply and Government Relations, Lantheus Medical Imaging
  • Northwest Medical Isotopes Mo-99 Production Program. Carolyn Haass, Chief Operating Officer, Northwest Medical Isotope, LLC
  • Tc-99m Payment Economics. Daniel Duvall, Medical Officer, Center for Medicare, Hospital and Ambulatory Policy Group, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
  • Economics of Global Radioisotope Production. Kevin Charlton, Senior Analyst, Nuclear Energy Agency, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Supply Chain for Molybdenum-99 Generators. Scott Claunch, Director, Pharmacy Safety and Practice, Industry and Government Affairs, Cardinal Health Pharmacy
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×

NOVEMBER 3, 2015, WASHINGTON, DC

  • Uranium Lease and Take-Back Program—an Update. Peter Karcz, Office of Material Management and Minimization (NA-23), National Nuclear Security Administration; Theresa Kliczewski, Environmental specialist, Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management
  • U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Role in Disposition of Radioactive Waste Resulting from Molybdenum-99 Production. Steven Lynch, Project Manager, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
  • The Effect of Emissions from Fission-Based Medical Isotope Production on Nuclear Explosion Detection. Tim Evans, Office of Nuclear Verification (NA-243), NNSA; Ted Bowyer, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
  • Coquí’s Mo-99 Production Program. Carmen Irene Bigles, President & CEO, Coquí Radio Pharmaceuticals Corp.
  • Niowave’s Mo-99 Production Program. Terry L. Grimm, President & Senior Scientist, Niowave, Inc.
  • Perma-Fix Medical Mo-99 Production Program. Lou Centofanti, President and Chief Executive Officer, Perma-Fix
  • UPPI’s LEU Walk. John Witkowski, President, United Pharmacy Partners

DECEMBER 16, 2015, OTTAWA, ONTARIO, CANADA

  • NRCan’s Role in Establishing Policies and Programs for Securing Supply of Mo-99/Tc-99, and Other Radioisotopes in Canada. Daniel Brady, Deputy Director, Nuclear Science & Technology, Natural Resources Canada
  • CIIC’s Project for Producing Tc-99m for Medical Use. Mark de Jong, Chief Technology Officer, Canadian Isotope Innovations Corp.; Kennedy Mang’era, Chief Operating Officer, Canadian Isotope Innovations Corp.; James George, Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Isotope Innovations Corp.
  • PIPE’s Project for Producing Tc-99m for Medical Use. Chris Saunders, Prairie Isotope Production Enterprise; Sandor Demeter, Section Head of Nuclear Medicine at the Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg MB, Co-Director of the Winnipeg Great West Life Positron Emission Tomography program, Associate Professor with the Department of Radiology (primary) and Community Health Sciences
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
  • TRIUMF’s Project for Producing Tc-99m for Medical Use. Ken Buckley, Project Manager; Technical Support: Targetry, TRIUMF
  • ACSI’s Oroject for Producing Tc-99m Using Medium Energy, High Current Cyclotrons. Brigitte Guérin, Full Professor, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke; Alex Zyuzin, Director Research and Business Development, Advanced Cyclotron Systems, Inc. (ACSI)

MARCH 30, 2016, CONFERENCE CALL

  • Uranium Lease and Take-Back Program—an Update. Peter Karcz, Office of Material Management and Minimization, National Nuclear Security Administration; Hitesh Nigam, Office of Nuclear Materials Disposition, Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management; Theresa Kliczewski, Environmental specialist, Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management; John Myers, DOE/EM

APRIL 20, 2016, WASHINGTON, DC

  • Department of Energy-National Nuclear Security Administration: Closing Remarks and Suggestions Related to the Academies Study. Jeffrey Chamberlin, Director, Office of Conversion, Material Management and Minimization, Department of Energy (DOE)-National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); Rilla Hamilton, Mo-99 Program Director, Office of Conversion, Material Management and Minimization, DOE-NNSA

JULY 8, 2016, CONFERENCE CALL

  • 2016 Medical Isotope Supply Review: 99Mo/99mTc Market Demand and Production Capacity Projection, 2016-2021. Kevin Charlton, Senior Analyst, Nuclear Energy Agency, OECD

SITE VISITS

  • May 12, 2015: Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL
  • May 14, 2015: University of Missouri Research Reactor Center, Columbia, MO
  • July 13-17, 2015: Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, and Russian Institute of Atomic Reactors Dimitrovgrad, Russia
  • August 11, 2015: Cardinal Health Pharmacy, Beltsville, MD
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
  • September 28-29, 2015: NTP Radioisotopes SOC, Ltd., and South African Fundamental Atomic Research Installation 1, Pretoria, South Africa
  • October 19-22, 2015: CERCA, Paris, France; IRE, Fleurus, Belgium; Mallinckrodt and High Flux Reactor, Petten, the Netherlands
  • December 14, 2015: Nordion, Kanata, Ontario, Canada
  • December 15, 2015: Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada
  • January 18-19, 2016: Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, Australia
  • February 4, 2016: Lantheus Medical Imaging, N. Billerica, MA
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 231
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 232
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 233
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 234
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 235
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations and Site Visits." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 236
Next: Appendix D: List of Radiopharmaceuticals and Associated Codes Used in the Committee's Medicare Data and Nuclear Pharmacy Data Analyses »
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The decay product of the medical isotope molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), technetium-99m (Tc-99m), and associated medical isotopes iodine-131 (I-131) and xenon-133 (Xe-133) are used worldwide for medical diagnostic imaging or therapy. The United States consumes about half of the world’s supply of Mo-99, but there has been no domestic (i.e., U.S.-based) production of this isotope since the late 1980s. The United States imports Mo-99 for domestic use from Australia, Canada, Europe, and South Africa.

Mo-99 and Tc-99m cannot be stockpiled for use because of their short half-lives. Consequently, they must be routinely produced and delivered to medical imaging centers. Almost all Mo-99 for medical use is produced by irradiating highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets in research reactors, several of which are over 50 years old and are approaching the end of their operating lives. Unanticipated and extended shutdowns of some of these old reactors have resulted in severe Mo-99 supply shortages in the United States and other countries. Some of these shortages have disrupted the delivery of medical care. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging examines the production and utilization of Mo-99 and associated medical isotopes, and provides recommendations for medical use.

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