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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
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References

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
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Fischhoff, B., Brewer, N., and Downs, J.S. (Eds.). (2011). Communicating Risks and Benefits: An Evidence-based User’s Guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Available: http://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/ReportsManualsForms/Reports/ucm268078.htm [June 2016].

Garfin, G.M. (2016). Methods and Approaches for Risk-Based Assessment and Communication: Climate Change and the U.S. Southwest. Presentation at Methods for Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: A Workshop for the U.S. Global Change Research Program, March 23-24, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Available: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/dbasse/becs/DBASSE_171812 [June 2016].

Garfin, G.M., Franco, G., Blanco, H., Comrie, A., Gonzalez, P., Piechota, T., Smyth, R., and Waskom, R. (2014). Southwest. In J.M. Melillo, T.C. Richmond, and G.W. Yohe (Eds.), Climate Change Impacts in the United States: The Third National Climate Assessment (Ch. 20, pp. 462-486). Washington, DC: U.S. Global Change Research Program. doi: 10.7930/J08G8HMN.

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Gilbraith, N., Azevedo, I.L., and Jaramillo, P. (2014). Regional energy and GHG savings from building codes across the United States. Environmental Science and Technology, 48(24), 14121-14130.

Gregory, R., Dieckmann, N., and Satterfield, T. (2016a). Characterizing Risk-Based Trade-Offs to Support Climate Change Decisions. Presentation at Methods for Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: A Workshop for the U.S. Global Change Research Program, March 23-24, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Available: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/dbasse/becs/DBASSE_171813 [June 2016].

Gregory, R., Satterfield, T., and Hasell, A. (2016b). Using decision-pathway surveys to inform climate engineering policy choices. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113(3), 560-565. Available: http://www.pnas.org/content/113/3/560.full.pdf [June 2016].

Hittinger, E., and Azevedo, I.L. (2015). Bulk energy storage increases U.S. electricity system emissions. Environmental Science and Technology, 49(5), 3203-3210.

Houser, T., Hsiang, S., Kopp, R., and Larsen, K. (2015). Economic Risks of Climate Change: An American Prospectus. New York: Columbia University Press.

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Kopp, R.E. (2016). Treatment of Uncertainty in Climate Change Risk Assessments. Presentation at Methods for Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: A Workshop for the U.S. Global Change Research Program, March 23-24, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Available: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/dbasse/becs/DBASSE_171814 [June 2016].

Kopp, R.E., Horton, R.M., Little, C.M., Mitrovica, J.X., Oppenheimer, M., Rasmussen, D.J., Strauss, B.H., and Tebaldi, C. (2014). Probabilistic 21st and 22nd century sea-level projections at a global network of tide-gauge sites. Earth’s Future, 2, 383-406. doi:10.1002/2014EF000239.

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
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Martinich, J. (2016). Climate Change in the United States: Benefits of Global Action. Presentation at Methods for Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: A Workshop for the U.S. Global Change Research Program, March 23-24, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Available: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/dbasse/becs/DBASSE_171815 [June 2016].

Melillo, J.M., Richmond, T.C., and Yohe, G.W. (Eds.). (2014). Highlights of Climate Change Impacts in the United States: The Third National Climate Assessment. Washington, DC: U.S. Global Change Research Program. Available: http://www.globalchange.gov/sites/globalchange/files/NCA3_Highlights_LowRes-small-FINAL_posting.pdf [June 2016].

Moser, S.C. (2016). Assessing Coastal Risks in Future National Climate Assessments. Presentation at Methods for Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: A Workshop for the U.S. Global Change Research Program, March 23-24, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Available: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/dbasse/becs/DBASSE_171816 [June 2016].

Moser, S.C., and Davidson, M.A. (2016). The third national climate assessment’s coastal chapter: The making of an integrated assessment. Climatic Change 135, 127-141. Available: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10584-015-1512-1 [June 2016].

Overpeck, J.T. (2016). Climate Change and the U.S. Southwest: Are We Getting the Risks Right? Presentation at Methods for Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: A Workshop for the U.S. Global Change Research Program, March 23-24, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Available: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/dbasse/becs/DBASSE_171816 [June 2016].

Rasmussen, D.J., Meinshausen, M., and Kopp, R.E. (in press). Probability-weighted ensembles of U.S. county-level climate projections for climate risk analysis. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JAMC-D-15-0302.1.

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×

Weaver, C. (2016). Comments from Organizing Committee Member Chris Weaver. Presentation at Methods for Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: A Workshop for the U.S. Global Change Research Program, March 23-24, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Available: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/dbasse/becs/DBASSE_171821 [June 2016].

Wilson, R.S. (2016). Framing Climate Change Risk to Enhance Effective Communication. Presentation at Methods for Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: A Workshop for the U.S. Global Change Research Program, March 23-24, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Available: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/dbasse/becs/DBASSE_171818 [June 2016].

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 72
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 73
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 74
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The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) was established in 1990 to “assist the Nation and the world to understand, assess, predict, and respond to human-induced and natural processes of global change.”1 A key responsibility for the program is to conduct National Climate Assessments (NCAs) every 4 years.2 These assessments are intended to inform the nation about “observed changes in climate, the current status of the climate, and anticipated trends for the future.” The USGCRP hopes that government entities from federal agencies to small municipalities, citizens, communities, and businesses will rely on these assessments of climate- related risks for planning and decision-making. The third NCA (NCA3) was published in 2014 and work on the fourth is beginning.

The USGCRP asked the Board on Environmental Change and Society of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a workshop to explore ways to frame the NCA4 and subsequent NCA reports in terms of risks to society. The workshop was intended to collect experienced views on how to characterize and communicate information about climate-related hazards, risks, and opportunities that will support decision makers in their efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce vulnerability to likely changes in climate, and increase resilience to those changes. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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