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Families Caring for an Aging America (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Appendix B

Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE MEMBER BIOGRAPHIES

Richard Schulz, Ph.D. (Chair), is Distinguished Service Professor of Psychiatry, director of the University Center for Social and Urban Research, director of Gerontology, and associate director of the Aging Institute of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Senior Services and the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Schulz’s work has focused on social-psychological aspects of aging, including the impact of disabling late-life disease on individuals and their families. He has been funded by the National Institutes of Health for more than three decades to conduct descriptive longitudinal and intervention research on diverse older populations representing illnesses such as cancer, spinal cord injury, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, and arthritis. In the past decade, he has become interested in supportive interventions, including technology-based approaches designed to enhance individual functioning and quality of life of both individuals and their relatives. Dr. Schulz has been a leading contributor to the literature on the health effects of caregiving, Alzheimer’s disease caregiving, and intervention studies for caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s disease. This body of work is reflected in more than 300 publications, which have appeared in major medical, psychology, and aging journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, and Archives of Internal Medicine. He is also the author of numerous books, including the Handbook of Alzheimer’s Caregiver Intervention Research and the Quality of Life Technology Handbook. Dr. Schulz is the recipient of several honors, including the Kleemeier Award for Research on Aging from

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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the Gerontological Society of America, the M. Powell Lawton Distinguished Contribution Award for Applied Gerontology from the American Psychological Association, and the Developmental Health Award for Research on Health in Later Life from the American Psychological Association. He earned his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Duke University.

María P. Aranda, Ph.D., M.S.W., M.P.A., joined the University of Southern California (USC) School of Social Work faculty in 1995 and holds a joint appointment with the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. Dr. Aranda’s research and teaching interests address the interplays among chronic illness, social resources, and psychological well-being in low-income minority populations. Dr. Aranda has served as Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator on several key studies funded by and/or in collaboration with the National Institute of Mental Health, National Cancer Institute, National Institute on Aging, Individual-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, Southern California, The John A. Hartford Foundation/The Gerontological Society of America, National Institute of Rehabilitation and Research, Alzheimer’s Association/Health Resources and Services Administration, Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, and Larson Endowment for Innovative Research. Overall, her research addresses the study of psychosocial care of adult and late-life psychiatric disorders, linguistic and cultural adaptations of behavioral health services, and evidence-based interventions. Dr. Aranda has 30 years of licensed clinical experience providing assessment and treatment services to middle-aged and older adults with co-morbid medical and psychiatric illness. She is a national trainer on evidence-based psychosocial treatments such as Problem Solving Treatment and Chronic Disease Self-Management. She has served on local and national boards and committees dedicated to the enhancement of practice, policy, research, and advocacy related to historically underrepresented minority populations. Dr. Aranda received her undergraduate degree in Social Work from the California State University, Los Angeles. She obtained her M.S.W., M.P.A., and Ph.D. from the University of Southern California.

Susan Beane, M.D., is the vice president and medical director of Healthfirst, Inc., a nonprofit, managed-care organization that provides health care coverage to individuals and families in the New York City metropolitan area through low- or no-cost government-sponsored health insurance programs, including Child Health Plus, Family Health Plus, Medicaid, and Medicare Advantage. Dr. Beane is a primary care physician and board-certified internist. She focuses on care management and clinical provider partnerships, especially programs designed to improve the delivery of vital, evidence-based health care to Healthfirst members. Prior to joining Healthfirst, Dr.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Beane served as chief medical officer for the Affinity Health Plan for 5 years. Before that, she was medical director at AmeriChoice and HIP USA. Dr. Beane is a graduate of Princeton University and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Sara J. Czaja, Ph.D., is a professor in the Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and Industrial Engineering at the University of Miami and scientific director of the Center on Aging at the University of Miami. She has an extensive background in scientific investigation related to family caregiving, functional performance of older adults, innovative use of technology in intervention research, supervision of both laboratory and field research, and administration of large-scale research programs. She is also the director of the Center on Research and Education for Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE). CREATE is funded by the National Institute on Aging and involves collaboration with the Georgia Institute of Technology and Florida State University. The focus of CREATE is on making technology more accessible, useful, and usable for older adults. Dr. Czaja’s research interests include aging and cognition, caregiving, human-computer interaction, training, and functional assessment. In addition, she is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, and the Gerontological Society of America. She is the past chair of the Risk Prevention and Behavior Scientific Review Panel of the National Institutes of Health. She is also the current president of Division 20 (Adult Development and Aging) of the American Psychology Association. She is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Human Systems Integration and has served on several National Research Council and Institute of Medicine committees.

Brian M. Duke, M.H.A., M.B.E., is system director, Senior Services with Main Line Health, leading a service line to meet the needs of older people throughout the care continuum and developing population health strategies and person- and family-centered approaches for care delivery. Mr. Duke came to Main Line Health following service as Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Aging. During his service he oversaw the delivery of services and benefits for older Pennsylvanians through a network of 52 area agencies on aging, and advocated for the interests of older people at all levels of government. He chaired the Pennsylvania Alzheimer’s Disease Planning Committee and co-chaired the Pennsylvania Long-Term Care Commission. Prior to his service as Secretary, Mr. Duke was director of the Bucks County Area Agency on Aging, leading the delivery of social services that helped older people to age and live well in their homes and communities. Prior to that he served as executive director of the New Jersey

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Foundation for Aging, a statewide public charity dedicated to improving the quality of life of older adults. Mr. Duke served as a consultant to the U.S. Administration on Aging and the AARP Foundation in the development of statewide caregiver coalitions in 12 states. He also co-chaired the Caring Community—a coalition of 100 organizations convened by WHYY, the public broadcasting station serving the greater Philadelphia region—producing award-winning programs and community outreach. Mr. Duke served as a consultant with the Family Caregiver: Outreach and Assistance in Our Communities project undertaken by the Penn State University Agricultural and Extension Education Programs to define strategies to engage and help family caregivers in rural regions. He is the author of the Caregiver Coalitions Advocacy Guide: Uniting Voices, Building Community with the National Alliance for Caregiving. Mr. Duke served as director of Geriatric Program Initiatives with the Institute on Aging of the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, he worked in the field of hospital administration for 20 years. He participates at the national, state, and local levels to foster effective strategies to support family caregivers, encourage aging well, and build community partnerships. He holds a B.S. in Business Administration from the University of Scranton, an M.H.A. (Health Administration) from The George Washington University, and an M.B.E. (Bioethics) from the University of Pennsylvania.

Judy Feder, Ph.D., is a professor of public policy and founding dean of the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. Dr. Feder has a long and distinguished career in health policy. A widely published scholar, she served as staff director of the U.S. Bipartisan Commission on Comprehensive Health Care (Pepper Commission); as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in former President Bill Clinton’s first term; and as a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress (2008-2011). She is currently an Institute Fellow at the Urban Institute. In 2012, Dr. Feder served on the Congressional Commission on Long-Term Care. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, the National Academy of Public Administration, and the National Academy of Social Insurance; a former chair and board member of AcademyHealth; a member of the Center for American Progress Action Fund Board, the Board of the National Academy of Social Insurance, and the Hamilton Project’s Advisory Council; and a senior advisor to the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured. Dr. Feder is a political scientist, with a B.A. from Brandeis University, and a master’s degree and Ph.D. from Harvard University.

Lynn Friss Feinberg, M.S.W., is a senior strategic policy advisor at the AARP Public Policy Institute, providing research, policy analysis, and tech-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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nical assistance on issues related to family caregiving and long-term services and supports. Ms. Feinberg came to AARP from the National Partnership for Women & Families, where she served as the first director of the Campaign for Better Care, an initiative to improve care in the United States for vulnerable older adults with multiple chronic conditions and their families. Previously, Ms. Feinberg was the deputy director of the National Center on Caregiving at the San Francisco-based Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA), where she was a leader in family-centered care and dementia issues, with special expertise in developing and replicating family caregiver support programs and translating research to promote policy change. During more than two decades at FCA, she directed the National Consensus Project for Caregiver Assessment, and led the first 50-state study on publicly funded caregiving programs in the nation, which was funded by the U.S. Administration on Aging from 2002 to 2004. In 2007-2008, Ms. Feinberg was selected as the John Heinz Senate Fellow in Aging, serving in the office of U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA). She received the American Society on Aging’s Leadership Award in 2006, and the Paul Nathanson Distinguished Advocate Award from Justice in Aging in 2015, for her career work on family care issues. Ms. Feinberg has published and lectured widely on family care policy and practice, and has served on numerous advisory boards and committees to address aging and caregiving issues. Currently, Ms. Feinberg is immediate past chair of the American Society on Aging, a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, and an elected member of the National Academy for Social Insurance. Ms. Feinberg holds a master’s degree in Social Welfare and Gerontology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Laura N. Gitlin, Ph.D., an applied research sociologist, is the director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging and a professor with joint appointments in the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and School of Medicine. Dr. Gitlin is nationally and internationally recognized for her research on developing, testing, and implementing novel nonpharmacologic interventions to improve the quality of life of persons with dementia and their family caregivers, enhance daily functioning in older adults with a disability, and address mental health disparities among minority groups. She is a well-funded researcher, having received continuous research and training grants from federal agencies and private foundations for nearly 30 years. A theme throughout her research is applying a social-ecological perspective and person-directed approach as well as collaborating with community organizations and health professionals to maximize the relevance and impact of intervention strategies. She is also involved in translating and implementing her team’s proven interventions for delivery in different social service and practice settings globally and in the United States.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Lisa P. Gwyther, M.S.W., is the founder and director of the Duke Family Support Program (FSP). She has also served as president of the Gerontological Society of America. FSP provides critical education and support for individuals with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, their families, and the health care and aging service networks that work with them. She is also co-leader of the Clinical Professional Unit for Social Work in the Duke Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and she directs the Duke Employee Elder Care Consultation Service. In 1993, Ms. Gwyther served as the first John Heinz Public Policy Fellow in Health and Aging and worked on the health staff of then-Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell. Her current research interests include community translation of evidence-based dementia caregiver interventions, early-stage Alzheimer’s programming, and nonpharmacological approaches to dementia-related behavioral symptoms. Ms. Gwyther received her bachelor’s degree in Psychology as well as a master’s degree in Social Work from Case Western Reserve University.

Rodger Herdman, M.D., is a retired physician with a distinguished career in both federal and state health policy. Dr. Herdman held positions as assistant professor and professor of pediatrics, respectively, at the University of Minnesota and the Albany Medical College between 1966 and 1979. In 1969, he was appointed director of the New York State Kidney Disease Institute in Albany. During 1969-1977, he served as deputy commissioner of the New York State Department of Health, responsible for research, departmental health care facilities, and the state’s Medicaid program at various times. In 1977, he was named New York state’s director of public health. From 1979 until joining the U.S. Congress’s Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), he was a vice president of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. In 1983, he was appointed assistant director of OTA for Health and Life Sciences and then acting director and director from 1993 to 1996. After the closure of OTA, he joined the Institute of Medicine (IOM) as a senior scholar and directed studies on graduate medical education, organ transplantation, silicone breast implants, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs national formulary. On completing those studies, Dr. Herdman was appointed director of the IOM/National Research Council National Cancer Policy Board from 2000 through 2005. From 2005 to 2009, he initiated and directed the IOM National Cancer Policy Forum, which differed from the Board by including members from federal and private-sector agencies or organizations in addition to at-large academic/industry members. From 2007 to 2014, he served as director of the IOM Board on Health Care Services in addition to his other duties. Dr. Herdman graduated from Yale University, Magna Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa, and from Yale University School of Medicine. He interned in Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota, was a medical officer, U.S. Navy, and thereafter, completed a residency

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
×

in Pediatrics and continued with a medical Fellowship in Immunology and Nephrology at Minnesota.

Ladson Hinton, M.D., is a geriatric psychiatrist, clinical and services researcher, and social scientist. Over the past two decades, Dr. Hinton has conducted interdisciplinary research to better understand the cultural and social dimensions of late-life depression, dementia-related illness, and caregiving experience among older adults and their families. He has applied this knowledge to develop innovative and culturally appropriate intervention approaches to overcome gaps and disparities in health care. Dr. Hinton has received national recognition for his expertise on the cultural aspects of geriatric mental health and family caregiving and has received multiple awards from the National Institutes of Health as a Principal Investigator. He is currently the Principal Investigator for a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) study titled “A Family-Based Primary Care Intervention to Enhance Older Men’s Depression Care” and is co-directing a project (CARE-Partners) to develop and implement innovative new community- and family-centered models of care for depression in older adults through a grant from the California-based Archstone Foundation. Dr. Hinton is the director of the University of California (UC), Davis, Latino Aging Research Resource Center, one of seven national Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), and he also directs the Education Core for the NIA-funded UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center. He chairs the Distinguished Scholars Advisory Board for the University of Southern California Roybal Institute on Aging and is an associate of the Harvard Asia Center, where he is engaged in a collaborative global health project to develop new models for eldercare in Asia. Dr. Hinton received his M.D. from Tulane University and completed his Psychiatric residency at UC San Francisco. He received postdoctoral training in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at UC San Francisco and in the NIMH-funded “Clinically-Relevant Medical Anthropology Program” at Harvard Medical School, where he conducted seminal work on dementia caregiving in ethnically diverse families. At UC Davis he was Co-Principal Investigator of the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (SALSA), where his work focused on how Mexican-American families are impacted by and deal with dementia behavioral problems, work that later informed the development and testing of a culturally tailored educational intervention for Latino dementia caregivers. His community work includes co-founding the UC Davis Spanish Mini-Medical School, partnering with the Asian Community Center to enhance dementia care services, and serving on the Chapter Board of Directors of the Northern California Alzheimer’s Association (2008-2012).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Peter Kemper, Ph.D., is an economist and expert on policy and delivery of long-term services and supports (LTSS). He has led a number of studies on the lifetime risk of needing LTSS, nursing home use, and expenditures for LTSS. His research on home care includes the evaluation of Channeling, a large randomized study that tested the effect of public financing of home care for older adults. Other research analyzes state options for the design of home care programs, case management in home care, the effect of state Medicaid home care spending on unmet need for personal care, and options for improving the jobs of direct care workers. Dr. Kemper has extensive experience designing complex evaluation and data collection projects. As Principal Investigator of the Community Tracking Study, he developed the overall study design and designed consumer, physician, and employer surveys. He also designed the evaluation of Better Jobs Better Care demonstration and directed surveys of home care aides, their supervisors, and clinical managers, and designed an employment information reporting system used to track job turnover. Dr. Kemper retired from Pennsylvania State University in 2011 to serve as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Disability, Aging, and Long-Term Care Policy in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. He had previously served as a commissioner on the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission and as a workgroup leader on the Clinton health reform effort. Before coming to Penn State, he was the vice president of the Center for Studying Health System Change, director of the Division of Long-Term Care Studies at the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, and director of the Madison Office of Mathematica. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Mathematics at Oberlin College and a doctorate in Economics at Yale University.

Linda O. Nichols, Ph.D., is the co-director of the Caregiver Center at the Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a professor of Preventive and Internal Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. The Caregiver Center at the Memphis VA Medical Center provides training to U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) staff across the country to work with caregivers of individuals with dementia, spinal cord injuries or disorders, multiple sclerosis, and post-traumatic stress disorder, and with families of post-9/11 veterans. Dr. Nichols is a health services researcher and medical anthropologist focusing on dementia caregiving and the challenges faced by military families during and after deployment. Her research is funded by the VA, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the National Institute on Aging. In 2011, her research became the basis for the Caregiver Center’s evidence-based national service programs for the Veterans Health Administration as part of the implementation of the VA’s caregiver legisla-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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tion. Dr. Nichols received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Washington University in St. Louis.

Carol Rodat, M.A., is the New York policy director for the Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute (PHI), a national organization dedicated to strengthening the direct care workforce that provides services and supports to older adults and people with disabilities. She is responsible for advocacy, research, and analysis on behalf of New York’s direct care workers and long-term services and supports consumers. Ms. Rodat has more than 30 years of policy experience, having worked in the field of child welfare for the Child Welfare League of America in Washington, DC, and as executive director of Hospital Trustees of New York State, where she initiated one of the first quality improvement projects in the state’s hospitals. Before joining PHI, she was the president of the Home Care Association of New York State, a nonprofit organization active in state and federal home care policy. She has published several reports and studies on the importance of the long-term services and supports workforce and testified frequently on the role of the direct care worker. Recently, she participated in a multiyear learning collaborative designed to improve the attention to and services for family caregivers and is currently working on identifying the roles that families and home care aides can play in the integration of care.

Charles P. Sabatino, J.D., is the director of the American Bar Association’s (ABA’s) Commission on Law and Aging. Since 1984, he has been responsible for the ABA Commission’s research, project development, consultation, and education in areas of health law, long-term services and supports, guardianship and capacity issues, surrogate decision making, legal services delivery for older adults, and professional ethics. He is also a part-time adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center, where he has taught Law and Aging since 1987. He is a Fellow and former president of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys and a board member of the Washington, DC-based Coalition to Transform Advanced Care, co-chairing its Public Policy Working Group. Mr. Sabatino received his B.A. from Cornell University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and is a member of the Virginia and Washington, DC bars.

Karen Schumacher, Ph.D., R.N., is a professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and an associate member of the Fred and Pamela Buffett Cancer Center. Dr. Schumacher’s clinical background is in home health care nursing. She worked extensively with family caregivers of older adults as a clinical nurse specialist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and as a home health care nurse at Community Health Services, Inc., in Nashville. Her research now focuses on family

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
×

caregiving for individuals with cancer. Her studies examine the caregiving skills needed to provide care at home during and after cancer treatment, as well as the similarities and differences in rural and urban caregiving. A concurrent research focus is management of cancer pain by individuals and family caregivers. Her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Cancer Society. Dr. Schumacher has extensive experience as a nurse educator, having served as a faculty member at Vanderbilt University, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and the University of Pennsylvania. While at the University of Pennsylvania, she served for 1 year as the Beatrice Renfield Visiting Nurse Scholar at the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. Dr. Schumacher received her bachelor’s degree in Nursing from Vanderbilt University, her master’s degree in Community Health Nursing from the University of Colorado, and her Ph.D. from UCSF. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Oregon Health & Science University.

Alan Stevens, Ph.D., is the Vernon D. Holleman-Lewis M. Rampy Centennial Chair in Gerontology at Baylor Scott & White Health, the largest nonprofit health care system in Texas. He is also professor of Medicine and Public Health at the Texas A&M University System Health Science Center. Dr. Stevens serves as the director of the Center for Applied Health Research (CAHR), a joint endeavor of Baylor Scott & White Health, the Texas A&M College of Medicine, and the Central Texas Veterans Health Care System. CAHR conducts and facilitates collaborative projects in the areas of translational and outcomes research. Dr. Stevens also heads the Center’s Program on Aging and Care, which develops and implements evidence-based clinical interventions for older adults and their caregivers, and he is the director of the National Institutes of Health-funded Community Research Center for Senior Health. Dr. Stevens is the appointed co-chair of the Hartford Change AGEnts Initiative, headquartered at the Gerontological Society of America. In 2012, Dr. Stevens was appointed for a 3-year term to the Board of Directors of the Texas Institute of Health Care Quality and Efficiency. Dr. Stevens completed his graduate training at the University of New Orleans, earning a master’s degree and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Applied Developmental Psychology. Prior to joining Baylor Scott & White Health and Texas A&M in 2005, he was an associate professor of medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Donna Wagner, Ph.D., dean of the College of Health and Social Services, New Mexico State University, has been examining family caregiving and workplace eldercare programs since the mid-1980s. She is a Fellow of both the Gerontological Society of America and the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), currently serving as president of AGHE.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Dr. Wagner’s research has included studies on long-distance caregiving, employed caregivers and the development of workplace programs, gender differences among employed caregivers, the efficacy of workplace eldercare programs, and the financial effects of family caregiving. She has published in the areas of rural caregiving, older caregivers, policy options to support caregivers, use of workplace programs, and programs and services for older adults. Dr. Wagner earned her B.A. in Psychology, as well as an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Urban Affairs from Portland State University, where she was affiliated with the Institute on Aging.

Jennifer L. Wolff, Ph.D., is a gerontologist and health services researcher who studies delivery of chronic care and long-term services and supports for older adults with complex health needs and late-life family caregiving. She has studied how the composition and experience of family caregivers has changed over time, how family caregivers navigate the medical system to facilitate health care for the individuals to whom they provide assistance, and the role of the medical community in supporting family caregivers. Dr. Wolff holds a primary appointment as associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and is jointly appointed in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. Dr. Wolff is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she earned a doctoral degree in Health Services Research.

STAFF BIOGRAPHIES

Jill Eden, M.B.A., M.P.H. (Study Director), has been a senior program officer and study director at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine since 2001. Her recent studies include Graduate Medical Education That Meets the Nation’s Health Needs (2014), The Mental Health and Substance Use Workforce for Older Adults: In Whose Hands? (2012), Finding What Works in Health Care: Standards for Systematic Reviews (2011), Initial National Priorities for Comparative Effectiveness Research (2009), and Knowing What Works in Health Care: A Roadmap for the Nation (2008). Before joining the Academies, Ms. Eden worked in a variety of health policy research settings, including Mathematica Policy Research (MPR) and the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and in health care financing at the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation and Kaiser Foundation Health Plan (Southern California). At MPR, Ms. Eden directed studies on health plan accreditation, the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, health care access and satisfaction in the military health system, the health care experiences of people who use community health centers, and the technical quality of state-specific,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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population-based surveys of health insurance coverage. At OTA, Ms. Eden authored or co-authored reports on individual cost sharing, Oregon’s 1990 proposal to significantly expand Medicaid in the state, adolescent health, and the impact of HIV and AIDS on individual health insurance. Earlier in her career, Ms. Eden contributed to new benefits and rate development in Kaiser’s southern California region and completed a 1-year hospital administration residency at the hospitals and clinics of a United Auto Workers health maintenance organization in Detroit. She received master’s degrees from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Business and the School of Public Health, and a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Barnard College.

Gus Zimmerman, M.P.P., is a research associate for the Board on Health Care Services and the Board on Health Sciences Policy of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Prior to his current position, Mr. Zimmerman worked as a research assistant at the Menges Group, a private health care consulting firm. He has also worked in the U.S. House of Representatives and the National Coalition for LGBT Health. Mr. Zimmerman holds a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from American University and a master’s degree in Public Policy from Georgetown University, with concentrations in Health and Technology Policy.

Katye Magee, M.P.A., is a senior program assistant for the Board on Health Care Services and the Board on Health Sciences Policy of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Prior to her current position, Ms. Magee completed her bachelor’s degree at Tulane University, where she studied Public Health and English. She recently completed her master’s of Public Administration at The George Washington University, with concentrations in health and social policy.

Sharyl Nass, Ph.D., serves as director of the Board on Health Care Services and director of the National Cancer Policy Forum at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The Board considers the entire health care system in order to ensure the best possible care for all individuals. Its activities pertain to the organization, financing, effectiveness, workforce, and delivery of health care. For more than 15 years, Dr. Nass has worked on a broad range of health and science policy topics that include the quality and safety of health care and clinical trials, oversight of health research, developing technologies for precision medicine, and strategies for large-scale biomedical science. She has a Ph.D. from Georgetown University and undertook postdoctoral training at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She also holds a B.S. and an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In addition, she studied at the Max

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Planck Institute in Germany under a Fellowship from the Heinrich HertzStiftung Foundation. She was the 2007 recipient of the Cecil Award for Excellence in Health Policy Research, the 2010 recipient of a Distinguished Service Award from the Academies, and the 2012 recipient of the Institute of Medicine staff team achievement award (as the team leader).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Families Caring for an Aging America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23606.
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Next: Appendix C: Public Workshop Agendas »
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Family caregiving affects millions of Americans every day, in all walks of life. At least 17.7 million individuals in the United States are caregivers of an older adult with a health or functional limitation. The nation’s family caregivers provide the lion’s share of long-term care for our older adult population. They are also central to older adults’ access to and receipt of health care and community-based social services. Yet the need to recognize and support caregivers is among the least appreciated challenges facing the aging U.S. population.

Families Caring for an Aging America examines the prevalence and nature of family caregiving of older adults and the available evidence on the effectiveness of programs, supports, and other interventions designed to support family caregivers. This report also assesses and recommends policies to address the needs of family caregivers and to minimize the barriers that they encounter in trying to meet the needs of older adults.

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