National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 7 Future Directions
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing Response Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23639.
×

References

Bradburn, N. (1978). Respondent burden. Proceedings of the Survey Research Methods Section of the American Statistical Association, 1978, 35-40. Available: https://www.amstat.org/sections/srms/proceedings/papers/1978_007.pdf [September 2016].

Chetty, R. (2012). Time Trends in the Use of Administrative Date for Empirical Research. National Bureau of Economic Research Summer Institute. Available: http://www.rajchetty.com/chettyfiles/admin_data_trends.pdf [September 2016].

Chipperfield, J., and Steel, D.G. (2012). Multivariate random effect models with complete and incomplete data. Journal of Multivariate Analysis, 109, 146-155.

Chipperfield, J., Barr, M., and Steel, D. (2013). Split Questionnaire Designs: Are They an Efficient Design Choice? Presented at the 59th World Statistics Congress of the International Statistical Institute, August 25-30, Hong Kong. Available: http://www.statistics.gov.hk/wsc/IPS033-P1-S.pdf [September 2016].

Cialdini, R.B. (1988). Influence: Science and Practice. Glenview, IL: Scott Foresman.

Commission on Federal Paperwork. (1977). A Report of the Commission on Federal Paperwork: Final Report Summary. Washington, DC. Available: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=pur1.32754075989214;view=1up;seq=3 [September 2016].

Davern, M., Meyer, B.D., and Mittag, N. (2015). Creating Improved Survey Data Products Using Linked Administrative-Survey Data. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology, December 8-9, Washington, DC. Available: http://fcsm.sites.usa.gov/reports/research/2015-research/ [September 2016].

Dillman, D.A. (2000). Mail and Internet Surveys: The Tailored Design Method (2nd ed.). New York: John Wiley.

Dillman, D.A., Smyth, J.D., and Christian, L.M. (2014). Internet, Phone, Mail and Mixed-Mode Surveys; The Tailored Design Method (4th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.

Fay, R.E. (1984). Replication approaches to the log-linear analysis of data from complex surveys. Recent Developments in the Analysis of Large-Scale Data Sets (pp. 95-118). Proceedings of a seminar held in Luxembourg, November 16-18, 1983. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities. Available: file:///C:/Users/ ywise/Downloads/CAAB84006ENC_001%20(1).pdf [October 2016].

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing Response Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23639.
×

Frankel, J. (1980). Measurement of Respondent Burden: Study Design and Early Findings. Technical Report. Washington, DC: Bureau of Social Science Research.

Fricker, S., Gonzalez, J., and Tan, L. (2011). Are You Burdened? Let’s Find Out. Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, October, Phoenix, AZ.

Fricker, S., Kreisler, C., and Tan, L. (2012). An Exploration of the Application of the PLS Path Modeling Approach to Creating a Summary Index of Respondent Burden. Paper presented at the Joint Statistical Meeting, August, San Diego, CA.

Galullo, D. (2013). Everything you know about branding is wrong. Forbes, December 3. Available: http://www.forbes.com/sites/onmarketing/2013/12/03/everything-you-knowabout-branding-is-wrong/#448f1aa66685 [September 2016].

Giesen, D. (2012). Exploring Causes and Effects of Perceived Response Burden. Paper presented at the International Conference on Establishment Surveys. Available: https://ww2.amstat.org/meetings/ices/2012/papers/302171.pdf [October 2016].

Gonzalez, J.M., and Eltinge, J.L. (2007). Multiple matrix sampling: A review. American Statistical Association: Proceedings of the Section on Survey Research Methods. Available: http://ww2.amstag.org/sections/srms/Proceedings [November 2016].

Gonzalez, J.M., and Eltinge, J.L. (2010). Optimal survey design: A review. American Statistical Association: Proceedings of the Section on Survey Research Methods. Available: http://ww2.amstag.org/sections/srms/Proceedings [November 2016].

Groves, R.M., and Couper, M. (1998). Nonresponse in Household Interview Surveys. New York: John Wiley.

Groves, R.M., and Heeringa, S. (2006). Responsive design for household surveys: Tools for actively controlling survey errors and costs. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A: Statistics in Society, 169(Pt. 3), 439-457.

Groves R.M., Singer E., and Corning, A.D. (2000). A leverage-saliency theory of survey participation: Description and illustration. Public Opinion Quarterly, 64, 299-308.

Hoogendoorn, A.W. (2004). A questionnaire design for dependent interviewing that addresses the problem of cognitive satisficing. Journal of Official Statistics, 20, 219-232.

Hoogendoorn, A.W., and Sikke, D. (1998). Response burden and panel attrition. Journal of Official Statistics, 14(2), 189-205.

Martin, E., Abreu, D., and Winters, F. (2001). Money and motive: Effects of incentives on panel attrition in the survey of income and program participation. Journal of Official Statistics, 17, 267-284.

Merkouris, T. (2015). An efficient estimation method for matrix survey sampling. Survey Methodology, 41(1), 237-262.

Meyer, B.D., Mok, W.K.C., and Sullivan, J.X. (2015). Household Surveys in Crisis. NBER Working Paper No. 21399. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research. Available: http://www.nber.org/papers/w21399.pdf [September 2016].

National Research Council. (1991). Improving Information for Social Policy Decisions: The Uses of Microsimulation Modeling. Volume 1. Review and Recommendations. C.F. Citro and E.A. Hanushek (Eds.). Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs. Committee on National Statistics, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (2011). Measuring the Group Quarters Population in the American Community Survey: Interim Report. K. Marton and P.R. Voss (Eds.). Panel on Statistical Methods for Measuring the Group Quarters Population in the American Community Survey. Committee on National Statistics, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing Response Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23639.
×

National Research Council. (2013a). Benefits, Burdens, and Prospects of the American Community Survey: Summary of a Workshop. D.L. Cork, Rapporteur. Committee on National Statistics, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2013b). Nonresponse in Social Science Surveys. Panel on a Research Agenda for the Future of Social Science Data Collection. Committee on National Statistics, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2015). Realizing the Potential of the American Community Survey: Challenges, Tradeoffs, and Opportunities. Panel on Addressing Priority Technical Issues for the Next Decade of the American Community Survey. Committee on National Statistics, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Navarro, A., and Griffin, R.A. (1993). Matrix sampling designs for the year 2000 census. American Statistical Association: Proceedings of the Section on Survey Research Methods. Available: http://ww2.amstag.org/sections/srms/Proceedings [November 2016].

President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. (1985). National School Population Fitness Survey. Available: http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED291714 [September 2016].

Raghunathan, T.E., and Grizzle, J.E. (1995). A split questionnaire survey design. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 90, 54-63.

Rubin, D.B. (1987). Multiple Imputation for Nonresponse in Surveys. New York: John Wiley.

Sharp, L.M., and Frankel, J. (1983). Respondent burden: A test of some common assumptions. Public Opinion Quarterly, 47, 36-53.

Thomas, N., Raghunathan, T.E., Schenker, N., Katzoff, M.J., and Johnson, C.L. (2006). An evaluation of matrix sampling methods using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Survey Methodology, 32, 217-232.

U.S. Census Bureau. (2014). American Community Survey Content Review Summit. Available: http://www2.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/operations_admin/2014_content_review/ACSContentReviewSummit.pdf [September 2016].

U.S. Census Bureau. (2015a). Agility in Action: A Snapshot of Enhancements to the American Community Survey. Washington, DC: American Community Survey Office, U.S. Census Bureau. Available: http://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/programs-surveys/acs/operations-and-administration/2015-16-survey-enhancements/Agility_in_Action.pdf [November 2016].

U.S. Census Bureau. (2015b). Reducing Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey: A Feasibility Assessment of Methods to Ask Survey Questions Less Frequently or of Fewer Respondents. Washington, DC: American Community Survey Office, U.S. Census Bureau. Available: https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/programs-surveys/acs/operations-and-administration/2015-16-survey-enhancements/Reducing_Burden_ACS_Feasibility_Assessment.pdf [September 2016].

U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). Submission for OMB review; comment request. Federal Register, 80(103), 30655-30659.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget. (2006). Standards and Guidelines for Statistical Surveys. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Management and Budget. Available: https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/inforeg/statpolicy/standards_stat_surveys.pdf [September 2016].

Zelenak, M.F., and David, M.C. (2013). Impact of Multiple Contacts by Computer-Assisted Telephone Interview and Computer-Assisted Personal Interview on Final Interview Outcome in the American Community Survey. Washington, DC: Decennial Statistical Studies Division, U.S. Census Bureau. Available: https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/working-papers/2013/acs/2013_Zelenak_01.pdf [September 2016].

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing Response Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23639.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing Response Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23639.
×
Page 95
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing Response Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23639.
×
Page 96
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing Response Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23639.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing Response Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23639.
×
Page 98
Next: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda »
Reducing Response Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $48.00 Buy Ebook | $38.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Although people in the United States have historically been reasonably supportive of federal censuses and surveys, they are increasingly unavailable for or not willing to respond to interview requests from federal—as well as private—sources. Moreover, even when people agree to respond to a survey, they increasingly decline to complete all questions, and both survey and item nonresponse are growing problems.

In March 2016, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to consider the respondent burden and its challenges and opportunities of the American Community Survey, which is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!