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Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop (2017)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
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Appendix C

Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators

Julienne N. Anoko, Ph.D., is a social anthropologist from the Sorbonne University in France. She completed her academic preparation in two areas (epidemiology and public health; gender and health performance) for her master’s degrees. For more than 15 years she has supported a variety of institutions (public administrations, nongovernmental organizations, international development, and United Nations organizations) in addressing social norms, communication for development, and gender issues, both during emergency outbreaks and in development programs for better efficiency and accountability. Between 2005 and 2014, Dr. Anoko supported the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) during the Ebola and Marburg outbreaks, as well as the H1N1 influenza pandemic in both developed and developing countries in Africa, America, and Europe. In 2015, she joined the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response in Guinea to coordinate, support, and leverage the Social Mobilization and Community Engagement pillar to implement interventions compatible with local contexts to gain community trust and participation in the overall response. Between 2015 and 2016, she was appointed as in-house social anthropologist of UNICEF in the Guinea Country Office to support the mainstreaming of social norms into both the Ebola emergency response and development programs. Dr. Anoko has published books and papers and contributed in developing several guidelines for United Nations agencies dealing with her areas of expertise. She has been featured on NPR and in articles in National Geographic, The Washington Post, WHO, and others. She received the Research and Innova-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
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tion 2015 Award from the French Red Cross Humanitarian Fund for her engagement in the field during the West African Ebola epidemic.

Stefano Bertuzzi, Ph.D., M.P.H., is the chief executive officer of the American Society for Microbiology, the largest single life science professional society with more than 50,000 members in 122 countries. Dr. Bertuzzi has wide experience in science policy, association management, and scholarly publishing and was a senior scientific executive at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the Office of the NIH Director, where he advised Dr. Elias Zerhouni on a wide range of science policy matters. He is one of the leaders who spearheaded the Declaration on Research Assessment to fight the misuse of impact factors, and he has widely contributed to the NIH revision of the peer-review system and the development of a public access policy to NIH-funded publications. He is the recipient of several NIH Director’s awards and other national and international awards. Dr. Bertuzzi received a master’s of public health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and a Ph.D. in molecular biotechnology at the Catholic University of Milan in Italy. After postdoctoral training in the Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology at the Salk Institute in San Diego, California, he became a Dulbecco Institute Telethon Scientist in Milan, Italy. He has authored numerous research publications, editorials, and science policy pieces. He is a member of the Aspen Institute and is an invited speaker at many national and international conferences.

Noel T. Brewer, Ph.D., is professor of health behavior at the University of North Carolina. Dr. Brewer studies how people make risky health decisions. His current work focuses on increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, improving cigarette pack warnings, and finding ways to explain the harms of medical screening. Dr. Brewer is chair of the National HPV Vaccination Roundtable and associate editor of Health Psychology Review. Dr. Brewer co-edited the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s book Communicating Risks and Benefits: An Evidence-Based User’s Guide.

Damien Chalaud, M.A., is the executive director of the World Federation of Science Journalists. He graduated from the University of London–Goldsmiths College with a master’s degree in communications and a master’s degree in journalism. From 1993 to 1997 he was a journalist and producer at BBC Radio and the BBC World Service. In 1998 he joined the European Broadcasting Union in Geneva as director of Eurosonic satellite operations. In 2001 he was appointed director of the cross-media platform at RFO-France Télévisions. From 2004 to 2007 he was director of content for the Radio France network in Paris, and from 2008 to 2013 he worked as a project manager and a consultant for different international broad-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

casters and web/mobile entities, including BBC, CBC, Danmarks Radio, Radio-Canada, ARD, RTE, Vodafone, and O2.

Jeffrey S. Duchin, M.D., is health officer and chief of the Communicable Disease Epidemiology and Immunization Section for Public Health, Seattle and King County, Washington, and professor of medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, and adjunct professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington. Dr. Duchin trained in internal medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He completed a fellowship in general internal medicine and emergency medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and infectious disease subspecialty training at the University of Washington. After several years on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania, he joined the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Epidemic Intelligence Service program, where he was assigned to the National Center for Infectious Diseases, and the CDC’s Preventive Medicine Residency program. He worked for CDC as a medical epidemiologist in the Divisions of Tuberculosis Elimination and HIV/AIDS Special Studies Branch before assuming his current position. Dr. Duchin is a member of CDC’s Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Infectious Diseases, and past member of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. He is a fellow of the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) and has chaired IDSA’s Public Health Committee and the Bioemergencies Task Force. Dr. Duchin serves on the Editorial Board and Technical Advisory Group for Communicable Disease Alert and Response to Mass Gatherings for the World Health Organization and previously served as a member of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 2004 Tiger Team, consulting with the government of Greece on health preparations for the 2004 Olympics in Athens. Dr. Duchin’s peer-review publications and research interests focus on communicable diseases of public health significance, and he has authored textbook chapters on outbreak investigations, bioterrorism, and the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS.

Kacey C. Ernst, Ph.D., M.P.H., is associate professor in epidemiology at the University of Arizona. Her work focuses on assessing the environmental and social factors associated with infectious disease emergence, primarily mosquito-borne diseases. She has a particular interest in using mixed-method research to identify how to engage communities in control strategies that are acceptable and sustainable. Although much of her work has focused on the U.S.–Mexico border region and western Kenya, she has also worked in Jamaica, Indonesia, and Ghana. Recently, she worked with collaborators at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Skoll Global Threats Fund to develop Kidenga, a community-based

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

surveillance and education app to monitor syndromes that are consistent with viruses transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito.

Angela Fagerlin, Ph.D., is the inaugural chair of the Department of Population Health Sciences at the University of Utah. She is also a research scientist at the Salt Lake City Veterans Affairs (VA) Center for Informatics Decision Enhancement and Surveillance (IDEAS). Until December 2015, she was professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan, a research scientist at the VA Ann Arbor Center for Clinical Management Research, and director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine. Dr. Fagerlin has been funded by the European Union and the National Science Foundation to study how different risk communication strategies influence the public’s view on infectious diseases (e.g., the Zika virus, Ebola, influenza) and vaccination. Her other research interests have focused on testing methods for communicating medical data (e.g., genetic test results, the risks and benefits of cancer treatment) to patients and providers and the development, testing, and implementation of decision-support interventions. She is internationally recognized for her work in determining how to engage patients in understanding life-changing diagnoses and making the best decisions for themselves. This research has been funded by the VA, the National Cancer Institute, and the National Institutes of Health.

Baruch Fischhoff, Ph.D., is Howard Heinz University Professor, Department of Engineering and Public Policy and the Institute for Politics and Strategy, Carnegie Mellon University. A graduate of the Detroit Public Schools, he holds a B.S. (mathematics, psychology) from Wayne State University and a Ph.D. (psychology) from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and has served on many National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committees. He is past president of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making and of the Society for Risk Analysis. He chaired the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee and has been a member of the Eugene Commission on the Rights of Women, the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Scientific Advisory Board, where he chaired the Homeland Security Advisory Committee. His books include Acceptable Risk; Risk: A Very Short Introduction; Judgment and Decision Making; A Two-State Solution in the Middle East; Counting Civilian Casualties; and Communicating Risks and Benefits. He co-chaired two National Academy of Sciences Sackler Colloquia on the Science of Science Communication, with associated special issues of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

Gaya Gamhewage, M.B.B.S., is head of interventions and guidance in the Infectious Hazard Management Department of the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) Health Emergency program, based at WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. A medical doctor by training, she is currently responsible for three crosscutting interventions for epidemic and pandemic response: technical information products for frontline responders; social science interventions, including risk communication and community engagement; and international mechanisms for vaccine stockpiles. Dr. Gamhewage has 15 years of experience in WHO, including 8 years in humanitarian response capacity building, 4 years as head of corporate communications, and 3 years as head of risk communications. She is also currently responsible for supporting governments across the world build sustainable risk communications capacity, as required by the International Health Regulations (2005) and the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework, and for integrating risk communication in all outbreak response work. In 2015 alone, she and her team trained 1,500 experts from 122 countries in risk communication. She is also leading the development of WHO’s first-ever evidence-based guidelines on emergency risk communication and has published several articles on the practice of risk communication in the 21st century. She has experience with academia, ministries of health, international nongovernmental organizations, and community-based organizations. For the international response to the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015, Dr. Gamhewage was assigned to coordinate all Ebola-related training for the international response according to the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response guidelines. She leads risk communication and community engagement work at the global level for WHO’s responses to Zika and yellow fever. She currently serves on the WHO Guideline Review Committee. Dr. Gamhewage holds an executive master’s degree in international negotiation and policy making from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies of Geneva and has several qualifications in conflict management, negotiation, and initiatives such as the United Nations Children’s Fund’s Children as Zones of Peace and WHO’s Health as Bridge for Peace. She has training in public health advocacy, social marketing, adult learning and medical teaching, evidence-based decision making, human rights programming, and global health studies. Born in Sri Lanka, Dr. Gamhewage spent most of her childhood in England. She spent 8 years in China studying and practicing medicine and has carried out assignments in more than 50 countries. She speaks English, Chinese, and Sinhalese and is learning Russian.

Jennifer Gardy, Ph.D., is both a scientist and a science communicator. As assistant professor in the School of Population and Public Health at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Jennifer holds a Tier 2 Canada Research

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

Chair in public health genomics. Situated at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), her lab uses microbial genomics, phylogenetics, and bioinformatics to understand the transmission and epidemiology of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis, influenza, and measles. Her group was the first to use genome sequencing to reconstruct a large outbreak of tuberculosis, and she is continuing to apply this novel technique to other outbreak scenarios. She is also involved in other genomics-related research, including metagenomic surveys of human and environmental samples. She completed a Ph.D. in microbial genomics and bioinformatics at Simon Fraser University in 2006 under Dr. Fiona Brinkman, as well as a postdoctoral fellowship in the systems biology of innate immunity with Dr. R. E. W. Hancock at UBC, before joining BCCDC in 2009. Outside of academia, Dr. Gardy works in science communication. She has hosted an eight-part science series for CBC television, multiple episodes of CBC’s long-running documentary series The Nature of Things, and is a regular guest host on Discovery Channel Canada’s flagship science newsmagazine, Daily Planet. She has also blogged and written for the Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail, recently published a children’s book called It’s Catching! The Infectious World of Germs and Microbes, and runs a series of workshops for graduate students and postdoctorates on how to communicate science effectively.

Rima F. Khabbaz, M.D., is deputy director for infectious diseases and director of the Office of Infectious Diseases at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prior to her current position, she served as director of CDC’s National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases and held other leadership positions across the agency’s infectious disease national centers. She is a graduate of the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, where she obtained both her bachelor’s degree in science and her medical doctorate degree. She trained in internal medicine and completed a fellowship in infectious diseases at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. She joined CDC in 1980 as an epidemic intelligence service officer, working in the Hospital Infections Program. During her CDC career, she has made major contributions to advance infectious disease prevention, including leadership in defining the epidemiology of non-HIV retroviruses (HTLV-I and II) in the United States and developing guidance for counseling HTLV-infected persons, establishing national surveillance for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome following the 1993 U.S. outbreak, and developing CDC’s blood safety and food safety programs related to viral diseases. She has also played key roles in CDC’s responses to outbreaks of new and/or reemerging viral infections, including Nipah, Ebola, West Nile, severe acute respiratory syndrom, and monkey pox, as well as the 2001 anthrax attacks. She is a fellow of the Infectious Disease

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

Society of America (IDSA) and member of the American Epidemiologic Society, the American Society for Microbiology, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. She served on IDSA’s Annual Meeting Scientific Program Committee and currently serves on the society’s Public Health Committee. In addition to her CDC position, she serves as adjunct professor of medicine (infectious diseases) at Emory University. She is a graduate of the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative at Harvard University and of the Public Health Leadership Institute at the University of North Carolina.

Lonnie King, D.V.M., is professor and dean emeritus of the College of Veterinary Medicine at The Ohio State University (OSU). In addition to leading this college, Dr. King is also a professor of preventive medicine and holds the Ruth Stanton Endowed Chair in veterinary medicine. He also serves as the executive dean for the seven health science colleges at OSU. Before becoming dean at OSU, he was the director of the National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED) at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In this position, Dr. King led the center’s activities for surveillance, diagnostics, disease investigations, epidemiology, research, public education, policy development, and disease prevention and control programs. NCZVED also focused on waterborne, food-borne, vector-borne, and zoonotic diseases of public health concern, which include most of CDC’s select and bioterrorism agents, neglected tropical diseases, and emerging zoonoses. Before serving as director, he was the first chief of the agency’s Office of Strategy and Innovation. Dr. King was in private veterinary practice for 7 years in Dayton, Ohio, and Atlanta, Georgia. A native of Wooster, Ohio, Dr. King received his B.S. and D.V.M. degrees from OSU in 1966 and 1970, respectively. He earned his M.S. in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota and received his M.P.A. from American University in Washington, DC, in 1991. Dr. King is a board-certified member of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and has completed the senior executive fellowship program at Harvard University. He served as president of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges from 1999 to 2000 and was vice chair for the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues from 2000 to 2004.

Gary L. Kreps, Ph.D., is a university distinguished professor and director of the Center for Health and Risk Communication at George Mason University in Washington, DC. He studies health, risk, and crisis communication, with a major focus on reducing health inequities. He publishes widely (more than 400 articles, books, and chapters) and has been funded by many federal agencies, foundations, health systems, foreign governments, and corporations. He served as the founding chief of the Health Communication

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

and Informatics Research Branch at the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health, where he planned national research programs to promote cancer prevention and control. He also served as the founding dean of the School of Communication at Hofstra University, executive director of the Greenspun School of Communication at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and a professor at Northern Illinois, Rutgers, Indiana, and Purdue Universities. He has received many honors for his work, including the 2015 Research Laureate Award from the American Academy for Health Behavior.

Heidi J. Larson, Ph.D., is an anthropologist and director of the Vaccine Confidence Project (VCP); associate professor in the Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; associate clinical professor in the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington; and fellow at the Chatham House Centre on Global Health Security. Dr. Larson previously headed global immunization communication at the United Nations Children’s Fund, chaired the Advocacy Task Force of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations, and served on the World Health Organization (WHO) Strategic Advisory Group of Experts Working Group on vaccine hesitancy. VCP is a WHO Center of Excellence on addressing vaccine hesitancy. Dr. Larson’s research focuses on the analysis of social and political factors that can affect uptake of health interventions and influence policies. Her particular interest is on risk and rumor management from clinical trials to delivery and on building public trust. She served on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Medical Countermeasure Emergency Communication Expert Working Group and is principal investigator of the European Union–funded EBODAC project on the deployment, acceptance, and compliance of an Ebola vaccine trial in Sierra Leone.

Katherine Lyon Daniel, Ph.D., is associate director for communication at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, and oversees CDC’s communication mission to provide lifesaving information to protect Americans from health threats. Dr. Lyon Daniel combines experience in strategic communication and behavioral science to lead CDC’s communication, including crisis and risk communications, health literacy, graphic design, video production, public affairs, digital and social media, employee communication, and communication research and evaluation. Under her leadership, CDC has enhanced the emergency risk communication needed to respond to complex global health emergencies such as the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, Ebola, and Zika epidemics; expanded digital media platforms and engagement with the public; and increased CDC’s focus on delivering clear, accessible, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

actionable information. Dr. Lyon Daniel received her Ph.D. in social ecology from the University of California, Irvine, and her B.A. in psychology from the University of Virginia. An expert in risk perception and understanding risk behavior, she has authored or co-authored dozens of scientific articles, directed multiple national communication campaigns, and received numerous professional communication awards.

Erma Manoncourt, Ph.D., is the founding president of M&D Consulting, Inc. and a retired United Nations Children’s Fund official who currently works as a senior management and development consultant. Based in Paris, France, she specializes in developing behavior and social change interventions, designing participatory methodologies, and evaluating behavioral interventions at both individual and community levels. She has worked more than 30 years in international development providing technical assistance in management and leadership; strategic planning, training, and facilitation skills; communication for development; and research, monitoring, and evaluation. As a public health specialist in behavior and social change, she has worked more than 15 years in sub-Saharan Africa in the areas of community-based development, nutrition and health programming, evaluation of family planning and women’s health programs, strategic planning and behavioral research, and most recently in the Ebola emergency response in West Africa. Dr. Manoncourt is also the current vice president of memberships in the International Union of Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) and cochair of the IUHPE Global Working Group on Social Determinants of Health. A social-behavioral scientist by training, Dr. Manoncourt holds a Ph.D. in public health, with a specialization in health behavior, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dina Fine Maron, M.P.H., is an award-winning journalist who covers health, medicine, and biology for Scientific American, where she is an editor. She has covered emerging threats, including Ebola, Zika, and antibiotic resistance. Her work has also appeared in publications, including Newsweek, Time.com, Greenwire, ClimateWire, Science News, and The Boston Globe. She has an M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University and a B.A. from Brandeis University. She has reported from Tanzania and also worked on global health projects in Thailand and Kenya. Her coverage on mental illness and stigma for Newsweek was awarded the Outstanding Media Award for 2009 from the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

Maryn McKenna, M.S.J., is an independent journalist who specializes in public health, global health, and food policy. She is a contributor to National Geographic, a senior fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, and the author of the critically

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

acclaimed books Superbug (2010) and Beating Back the Devil (2004), both published by Simon & Schuster. She appeared in the 2014 documentary Resistance, and her 2015 TED Talk, “What do we do when antibiotics don’t work any more?” has been viewed 1.4 million times and translated into 32 languages. She writes for The New York Times, WIRED, Scientific American, Slate, The Atlantic, Nature, and The Guardian, among other publications, and received the 2014 Leadership Award from the Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics and the 2013 Byron H. Waksman Award for Excellence in the Public Communication of Life Sciences. Her next book on antibiotics and agriculture will be published by Penguin Random House in 2017.

Jeff Niederdeppe, Ph.D., is associate professor in the Department of Communication at Cornell University. His research examines the mechanisms and effects of mass media campaigns; strategic health messages; and news coverage in shaping health behavior, health disparities, and social policy. He has published more than 95 peer-reviewed articles in communication, public health, health policy, and medical journals, and his work has been funded in recent years by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Town Creek Foundation. He is associate editor of Communication Methods and Measures and serves on the editorial boards of eight other journals.

Rafael Obregon, Ph.D., is chief of the Communication for Development Section, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), New York. Prior to joining UNICEF he was associate professor in the School of Media Arts and Studies and director of the Communication and Development Studies Program, Center for International Studies, at Ohio University. He has extensive teaching, research, and professional experience in health communication and international development. He was an associate professor at the Department of Social Communication at Colombia’s Universidad del Norte (1997-2002), where he served as adjunct faculty. He is a member of the review board of several journals, including the Journal of Health Communication, and serves as guest reviewer of Social Science & Medicine, Health Policy, and BioMed Central. He is a member of several international associations, including the International Communication Association and the Latin American Association of Communication Researchers. He has published numerous books, peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and technical reports, including The Handbook of Development Communication and Social Change (2014) and The Handbook of Global Health Communication (2012). He earned a doctorate in mass communication, The Pennsylvania State University; an M.A. in international affairs, Ohio

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

University; and a B.A. in social communication and journalism, Universidad Autonoma, Colombia.

Jennifer Olsen, Ph.D., serves as the manager of pandemics at the Skoll Global Threats Fund. Prior to her move to San Francisco, she served as the division director of fusion within the Office of Emergency Management, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In that role, Dr. Olsen led initiatives for data fusion, data integration, analytics, and visualizations to enable improved decision making by responders at various levels. During her time at ASPR, Dr. Olsen led the information analysis efforts for the following responses: Superstorm Sandy, Deepwater Horizon, Haiti earthquake, the 2009 presidential inauguration, two sets of political conventions, and H1N1 influenza. Prior to her tenure at ASPR, Dr. Olsen served as a reachback engineer at the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) with a focus on atmospheric dispersion and epidemiological modeling. As part of her time at DTRA, Dr. Olsen also served as program manager for a research and development effort to improve agent-based modeling for decision makers. Dr. Olsen received her bachelor’s degree in biomathematics from Rutgers University and her master’s of public health with a focus on epidemiology from George Washington University. She holds a Certificate in Weapons of Mass Destruction from the Uniformed Services University for Health Sciences. In 2013, Dr. Olsen completed her doctorate from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; her dissertation research focused on fusing and implementing digital disease-detection approaches in the federal government.

John Rainford, M.P.A., is the director of The Warning Project. He is the former director of Emergency and Risk Communications for Health Canada and global project lead of Risk Communication Capacity Building for the World Health Organization (WHO). Additionally, he worked at the Privy Council Office in Ottawa as the lead analyst responsible for national security communications. Mr. Rainford is part of the training team for WHO’s Emergency Communication Network and sits as the communication expert on WHO’s Emergency Committee on Polio Eradication. He has specialized in the field of high risk communication for the past 15 years after several years covering and working in politics as a journalist and aide on Canada’s Parliament Hill. He has a master’s of public administration from Queen’s University, teaches risk communication at Carleton University, and has led emergency risk communication workshops around the world involving participants from more than 150 countries.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

David Relman, M.D., is the Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor in the Departments of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University and is the chief of Infectious Diseases at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System in Palo Alto, California. He received an S.B. (biology) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1977) and his M.D. (magna cum laude) from Harvard Medical School (1982), completed his clinical training in internal medicine and infectious diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital, served as a postdoctoral fellow in microbiology at Stanford University, and joined the faculty at Stanford in 1994. Dr. Relman advises the U.S. government as well as nongovernmental organizations in matters pertaining to microbiology, emerging infectious diseases, and biosecurity. He is a member of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity and a member of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Synthetic Biology Panel, and he advises several U.S. government departments and agencies on matters related to pathogen diversity, the future life sciences landscape, and the nature of present and future biological threats. He has served as chair of the board of scientific counselors of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and as president of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (2012-2013). Dr. Relman was vice chair of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) committee that studied the science underlying the Federal Bureau of Investiation’s investigation of the 2001 anthrax mailings, and he cochaired a 3-year NAS study that produced a widely cited report titled Globalization, Biosecurity, and the Future of the Life Sciences (2006). He is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the Association of American Physicians. Dr. Relman received the Squibb Award from the Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2001 and was the recipient of the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and the Distinguished Clinical Scientist Award from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation in 2006 as well as a Transformative R01 Award from NIH in 2013. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Medicine in 2011.

Rajiv N. Rimal, Ph.D., M.A., is professor and chair of the Department of Prevention and Community Health in the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. Dr. Rimal has more than 20 years of experience in health communication and risk communication research, much of it in evaluation of media and other communication-based interventions to promote wellness and save lives in the developing world. He has conducted behavior change interventions and evaluations in several countries, including Ethiopia, India, Malawi, Mexico, Namibia, Nepal, Serbia, Uganda, and the United States. His most recent work is using social norms, social network analyses, and agent-based modeling to develop

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
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region-representative data and subsequently implement and evaluate behavior change interventions. This work is currently being piloted in Ethiopia.

J. Douglas Storey, Ph.D., is associate director at the Center for Communication Programs and faculty member at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, where he teaches courses on strategic health communication programs. He has 30 years of experience in health communication, development communication, and evaluation research and has lived and worked in 29 countries. His work spans a wide range of topics, including reproductive health, maternal and child health, avian and pandemic flu, preventive health behavior, environmental communication, community capacity building, and strategic communication planning. He has consulted on health behavior communication research, evaluation, and strategic planning for numerous international organizations and foundations. Previously, he was director of program research for the Health Communication Partnership and has worked with the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness since 2006, researching the role of communication in all-hazards preparedness planning and response. Dr. Storey is ex officio chair of the Health Communication Division of the International Communication Association. He is fluent in Indonesian.

Rev. John B. Sumo, M.P.H., M.Th., M.A., is a Liberian who works for the Liberian Ministry of Health as director of the Health Promotion Division, where he provides leadership for developing messages, community engagement, media engagement, and risk communication for the country. He also serves as one of the focal persons for the INTERPOL RHINO project on biosafety and biosecurity in Liberia and has served as the chair on social mobilization during the Ebola outbreak in Liberia and still serves in that capacity to strengthen collaboration with partners. He joined the ministry in 2010 after completing his studies in theology and public health in the United States. Rev. Sumo has participated in several international workshops and conferences in Angola, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, France, Geneva, Ghana, Nigeria, and Senegal. Those workshops included topics on immunization, data harmonization, social behavior change communication, leadership in strategic communication, global Ebola vaccines, and the World Health Organization Conference on Health Promotion.

Monique Mitchell Turner, Ph.D., M.A., is associate professor and assistant dean at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. Dr. Turner’s expertise is in campaign message design and evaluation, risk communication, risk perception, and cognitive processing of health risks, including informed decision making and critical thinking.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

Dr. Turner is the author of the anger activism model, a behavioral theory explaining the conditions when emotions (anger) can be constructive versus deleterious. She is most well-known for her work in risk perception and risk communication. As the former director of the Center for Risk Communication Research at the University of Maryland, Dr. Turner’s research has been funded by organizations such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services and Homeland Security. Dr. Turner has written and published more than 60 research papers, journal articles, book chapters, and books on persuasion, health communication, and risk perception. She was formerly the associate editor of Communication Research Reports and is the past chairperson of both the Communication and Social Cognition Division of the National Communication Association and the Health Communication Division of the International Communication Association. She is the former senior editor of Health Communication.

Nick van Praag directs Ground Truth Solutions, which he set up in 2012 with the goal of helping humanitarian actors systematically listen and respond to the people aid agencies set out to help. Ground Truth Solutions is now working with a range of partners in more than 15 countries. It was recently commissioned by the Secretariat of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development to track implementation of the Grand Bargain from the perspective of affected populations. Mr. van Praag’s previous career spans humanitarian and development work at the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the Aga Khan Development Network, and the World Bank. His interest in affected populations’ feedback and humanitarian performance stems from his work at the intersection of communication and public policy at the World Bank and his experience of humanitarian aid delivery at UNHCR.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 109
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 110
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 111
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 112
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 113
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 114
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 115
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 116
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 117
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 118
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 119
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 120
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Building communication capacity is a critical piece of preparing for, detecting, and responding to infectious disease threats. The International Health Regulations (IHR) establish risk communication—the real-time exchange of information, advice, and opinions between experts or officials and people who face a threat to their survival, health, and economic or social well-being—as a core capacity that World Health Organization member states must fulfill to strengthen the fight against these threats. Despite global recognition of the importance of complying with IHR, 67 percent of signatory countries report themselves as not compliant. By investing in communication capacity, public health and government officials and civil society organizations facing health crises would be prepared to provide advice, information, and reassurance to the public as well as to rapidly develop messages and community engagement activities that are coordinated and take into account social and behavioral dynamics among all sectors.

To learn about current national and international efforts to develop the capacity to communicate effectively during times of infectious disease outbreaks, and to explore gaps in the research agenda that may help address communication needs to advance the field, the Forum on Microbial Threats of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a 1.5 day workshop on December 13 and 14, 2016, in Washington, DC. Participants reviewed progress and needs in strengthening communication capacity for dealing with infectious disease threats for both outbreaks and routine challenges in the United States and abroad. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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