National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 7 Workshop Highlights and Reflections
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

References

Bedrosian, S. R., C. E. Young, L. A. Smith, J. D. Cox, C. Manning, L. Pechta, J. L. Telfer, M. Gaines-Mccollom, K. Harben, W. Holmes, K. M. Lubell, J. H. McQuiston, K. Nordlund, J. O’Connor, B. S. Reynolds, J. A. Schindelar, G. Shelley, and K. L. Daniel. 2016. Lessons of risk communication and health promotion: West Africa and United States. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Supplement 65(3):68-74.

Brewer, N. T., and W. K. Hallman. 2006. Subjective and objective risk as predictors of influenza vaccination during the vaccine shortage of 2004-2005. Clinical Infectious Diseases 43(11):1379-1386.

Brewer, N. T., A. R. Richman, J. T. DeFrank, V. F. Reyna, and L. A. Carey. 2012. Improving communication of breast cancer recurrence risk. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 133(2):553-561.

Brewer, N. T., M. G. Hall, S. M. Noar, H. Parada, A. Stein-Seroussi, L. E. Bach, S. Hanley, and K. M. Ribisl. 2016. Effect of pictorial cigarette pack warnings on changes in smoking behavior: A randomized clinical trial. JAMA Internal Medicine 176(7):905-912.

Brownell, K. D., and T. R. Frieden. 2009. Ounces of prevention: The public policy case for taxes on sugared beverages. New England Journal of Medicine 360(18):1805-1808.

Bruine De Bruin, W., B. Fischhoff, L. Brilliant, and D. Caruso. 2006. Expert judgments of pandemic influenza risks. Global Public Health 1(2):178-193.

CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). 2011. A CDC framework for preventing infectious diseases. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dredze, M., D. A. Broniatowski, and K. M. Hilyard. 2016. Zika vaccine misconceptions: A social media analysis. Vaccine 34(30):3441-3442.

Durkin, S., E. Brennan, and M. Wakefield. 2012. Mass media campaigns to promote smoking cessation among adults: An integrative review. Tobacco Control 21(2):127-138.

Enria, L., S. Lees, E. Smout, T. Mooney, A. F. Tengbeh, B. Leigh, B. Greenwood, D. Watson-Jones, and H. Larson. 2016. Power, fairness and trust: Understanding and engaging with vaccine trial participants and communities in the setting up the EBOVAC-Salone vaccine trial in Sierra Leone. BMC Public Health 16(1):1140.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

Falk, E. B., E. T. Berkman, D. Whalen, and M. D. Lieberman. 2011. Neural activity during health messaging predicts reductions in smoking above and beyond self-report. Health Psychology 30(2):177-185.

Farrelly, M. C., K. C. Davis, M. L. Haviland, P. Messeri, and C. G. Healton. 2005. Evidence of a dose-response relationship between “truth” antismoking ads and youth smoking prevalence. American Journal of Public Health 95(3):425-431.

FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) Risk Communication Advisory Committee. 2009. FDA’s Strategic Plan for Risk Communication. Rockville, MD: U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Fischhoff, B. 2015. The realities of risk-cost-benefit analysis. Science 350(6260):aaa6516.

Fischhoff, B., and D. A. Scheufele. 2013a. The science of science communication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110(Suppl 3):14033-14039.

Fischhoff, B., and D. A. Scheufele. 2013b. The science of science communication II. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111(Suppl 4):13583-13584.

Fischhoff, B., N. T. Brewer, and J. S. Downs. 2011. Communicating risks and benefits: An evidence-based user’s guide. Silver Spring, MD: U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Foy, B. D., K. C. Kobylinski, J. L. Chilson Foy, B. J. Blitvich, A. Travassos da Rosa, A. D. Haddow, R. S. Lanciotti, and R. B. Tesh. 2011. Probable non-vector-borne transmission of Zika virus, Colorado, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases 17(5):880-882.

Frieden, T. R., W. Dietz, and J. Collins. 2010. Reducing childhood obesity through policy change: Acting now to prevent obesity. Health Affairs 29(3):357-363.

Good Business. 2015. Exploring the consumer perspective on antimicrobial resistance. London, UK: Wellcome Trust.

Gurmankin, A. D., S. Domchek, J. Stopfer, C. Fels, and K. Armstrong. 2005. Patients’ resistance to risk information in genetic counseling for BRCA1/2. Archives of Internal Medicine 165(5):523-529.

IOM (Institute of Medicine). 1992. Emerging infections: Microbial threats to health in the United States. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

IOM. 1999. Toward environmental justice: Research, education, and health policy needs. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

IOM. 2013. Evaluation of PEPFAR. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

IOM. 2014. Characterizing and communicating uncertainty in the assessment of benefits and risks of pharmaceutical products: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

IOM and NRC (Institute of Medicine and National Research Council). 2015. Potential risks and benefits of gain-of-function research: Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Kaufman, M. R., R. N. Rimal, M. Carrasco, O. Fajobi, A. Soko, R. Limaye, and G. Mkandawire. 2014. AIDS impact/SEISIDA special issue: Using social and behavior change communication to increase HIV testing and condom use: The Malawi BRIDGE project. AIDS Care 26(Suppl 1):S46-S49.

Larson, H. J., D. M. Smith, P. Paterson, M. Cumming, E. Eckersberger, C. C. Freifeld, I. Ghinai, C. Jarrett, L. Paushter, J. S. Brownstein, and L. C. Madoff. 2013. Measuring vaccine confidence: Analysis of data obtained by a media surveillance system used to analyse public concerns about vaccines. The Lancet Infectious Diseases 13(7):606-613.

Larson, H. J., R. Wilson, S. Hanley, A. Parys, and P. Paterson. 2014. Tracking the global spread of vaccine sentiments: The global response to Japan’s suspension of its HPV vaccine recommendation. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics 10(9):2543-2550.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

Larson, H. J., A. de Figueiredo, Z. Xiahong, W. S. Schulz, P. Verger, I. G. Johnston, A. R. Cook, and N. S. Jones. 2016. The state of vaccine confidence 2016: Global insights through a 67-country survey. EBioMedicine 12:295-301.

Lewandowsky, S., U. K. Ecker, C. M. Seifert, N. Schwarz, and J. Cook. 2012. Misinformation and its correction: Continued influence and successful debiasing. Psychological Science in the Public Interest 13(3):106-131.

Morgan, M. G. 2014. Use (and abuse) of expert elicitation in support of decision making for public policy. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111(20):7176-7184.

Niederdeppe, J., M. C. Farrelly, and M. L. Haviland. 2004. Confirming “truth”: More evidence of a successful tobacco countermarketing campaign in Florida. American Journal of Public Health 94(2):255-257.

Niederdeppe, J., M. C. Farrelly, and D. Wenter. 2007. Media advocacy, tobacco control policy change and teen smoking in Florida. Tobacco Control 16(1):47-52.

Niederdeppe, J., M. C. Farrelly, J. C. Hersey, and K. C. Davis. 2008a. Consequences of dramatic reductions in state tobacco control funds: Florida, 1998-2000. Tobacco Control 17(3):205-210.

Niederdeppe, J., M. C. Fiore, T. B. Baker, and S. S. Smith. 2008b. Smoking-cessation media campaigns and their effectiveness among socioeconomically advantaged and disadvantaged populations. American Journal of Public Health 98(5):916-924.

Niederdeppe, J., M. C. Farrelly, J. Nonnemaker, K. C. Davis, and L. Wagner. 2011. Socioeconomic variation in recall and perceived effectiveness of campaign advertisements to promote smoking cessation. Social Science and Medicine 72(5):773-780.

Noar, S. M., M. G. Hall, D. B. Francis, K. M. Ribisl, J. K. Pepper, and N. T. Brewer. 2016. Pictorial cigarette pack warnings: A meta-analysis of experimental studies. Tobacco Control 25(3):341-354.

NRC (National Research Council). 1989. Improving risk communication. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Pew Research Center. 2013. Most expect “occasional acts of terrorism” in the future. http://www.people-press.org/2013/04/23/most-expect-occasional-acts-of-terrorism-in-the-future (accessed February 16, 2017).

Rimal, R. N., and R. L. Limaye. 2013. Socio-cognitive approaches for AIDS prevention: Explicating the role of risk perception and efficacy beliefs in Malawi. Public Communication Campaigns (4th Ed.). Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Rimal, R. N., K. Bose, J. Brown, G. Mkandawire, and L. Folda. 2009a. Extending the purview of the risk perception attitude framework: Findings from HIV/AIDS prevention research in Malawi. Health Communication 24(3):210-218.

Rimal, R. N., J. Brown, G. Mkandawire, L. Folda, K. Bose, and A. H. Creel. 2009b. Audience segmentation as a social-marketing tool in health promotion: Use of the risk perception attitude framework in HIV prevention in Malawi. American Journal of Public Health 99(12):2224-2229.

Sharma, M., K. Yadav, N. Yadav, and K. C. Ferdinand. 2017. Zika virus pandemic-analysis of Facebook as a social media health information platform. American Journal of Infection Control 45(3):301-302.

Turner, M. M., H. Shaikh, and R. N. Rimal. 2016. Ebola risk communication project in Liberia: Lessons in crisis communication. Washington, DC: Department of Prevention and Community Health, George Washington University.

Wakefield, M. A., B. Loken, and R. C. Hornik. 2010. Use of mass media campaigns to change health behaviour. The Lancet 376(9748):1261-1271.

WHO (World Health Organization). 2008. World Health Organization outbreak communication planning guide. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

WHO. 2015. Implementation of the International Health Regulations (2005), report of the review committee on second extensions for establishing national public health capacities and on IHR implementation. Sixty-Eighth World Health Assembly. Geneva, Swtizerland: World Health Organization.

WHO. 2016a. IHR (2005) monitoring and evaluation framework: Joint External Evaluation tool. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization.

WHO. 2016b. Risk communication: Data by WHO region. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization.

Wilkinson, A., M. Parker, F. Martineau, and M. Leach. 2017. Engaging “communities”: Anthropological insights from the West African Ebola epidemic. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 372(1721):20160305.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 98
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 100
Next: Appendix A: Statement of Task »
Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $60.00 Buy Ebook | $48.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Building communication capacity is a critical piece of preparing for, detecting, and responding to infectious disease threats. The International Health Regulations (IHR) establish risk communication—the real-time exchange of information, advice, and opinions between experts or officials and people who face a threat to their survival, health, and economic or social well-being—as a core capacity that World Health Organization member states must fulfill to strengthen the fight against these threats. Despite global recognition of the importance of complying with IHR, 67 percent of signatory countries report themselves as not compliant. By investing in communication capacity, public health and government officials and civil society organizations facing health crises would be prepared to provide advice, information, and reassurance to the public as well as to rapidly develop messages and community engagement activities that are coordinated and take into account social and behavioral dynamics among all sectors.

To learn about current national and international efforts to develop the capacity to communicate effectively during times of infectious disease outbreaks, and to explore gaps in the research agenda that may help address communication needs to advance the field, the Forum on Microbial Threats of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a 1.5 day workshop on December 13 and 14, 2016, in Washington, DC. Participants reviewed progress and needs in strengthening communication capacity for dealing with infectious disease threats for both outbreaks and routine challenges in the United States and abroad. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!