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Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease (2017)

Chapter: Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
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Appendix E

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Shiriki K. Kumanyika, Ph.D., M.S., M.P.H. (Chair), is Professor of Epidemiology Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and Research Professor in the Department of Community Health & Prevention at the Dornsife School of Public Health at Drexel University. She founded and continues to chair the African American Collaborative Obesity Research Network, which now has its national office at the Dornsife School. Elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2003, Dr. Kumanyika is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Obesity Solutions and the Steering Committee for the Vital Directions initiative and has chaired or served on several other National Academies committees and the Food and Nutrition Board. She served on two U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committees and on the World Cancer Research Fund Expert Panel on Diet, Nutrition, and Cancer Prevention and is past president of the American Public Health Association. Her current service includes membership on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Task Force on Community Preventive Services, the World Health Organization Nutrition Guidance Expert Advisory Group Subgroup on Diet and Health, and the Lancet Commission on Obesity. Dr. Kumanyika has a Ph.D. in human nutrition from Cornell University, an M.S. in social work from Columbia University, and an M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University.

Cheryl A. M. Anderson, Ph.D., M.P.H., is Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. Before this appointment she was an assistant professor in the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×

Department of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. Dr. Anderson’s research centers on nutrition-related issues in chronic disease prevention in minority and underserved populations. Dr. Anderson is the principal investigator of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-funded study of the effects of dietary sodium and potassium intake on subclinical and clinical cardiovascular disease. She is a co-investigator on the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases–funded national, multicenter Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study, which aims to identify risk factors and mechanisms of progressive renal disease and cardiovascular events in individuals with chronic kidney disease, and is a co-investigator on the NHLBI-funded Optimal Macronutrient Intake (OMNI)-Carb study, a randomized feeding study that compares the effects of type (glycemic index) and amount of carbohydrate on cardiovascular risk factors. Dr. Anderson is principal investigator of a study testing a unique biomarker (using carbon isotopic data) of intake of sweets (funded by an Innovation Grant Award from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health). Before her appointment at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Anderson was an Instructor of Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Dr. Anderson served on two Institute of Medicine committees—Committee on Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake and Committee on Use of Dietary Supplements by Military Personnel. She currently serves on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Committee on Consequences of Sodium Reduction in Populations. She has a B.S. from Brown University, an M.P.H. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and an M.S. in epidemiology and Ph.D. in nutritional sciences from the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine.

Susan I. Barr, Ph.D., R.D., is Professor Emeritus of Food Nutrition and Health at the University of British Columbia. Her research interests relate to how women’s cognitions about food, eating, and body weight may have physiological implications for their health. Dr. Barr also has an interest in dietary policy and was involved in the development of the Dietary Reference Intakes and has also been a member of Health Canada committees working on revision of Canada’s Food Guide and on dietary sodium reduction. Additionally, she has an interest in dietary practices and dietary survey data. Recent work in this area has examined the contribution of breakfast to nutrient adequacy of Canadians, and the perceptions and practices of Canadians with regard to milk product intake. Dr. Barr has a Ph.D. in human nutrition from the University of Minnesota.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×

Kathryn G. Dewey, Ph.D., is Distinguished Professor in the Department of Nutrition and Director of the Program in International and Community Nutrition at the University of California, Davis. Her research focuses on maternal and child nutrition in both low-income and higher-income populations, particularly infant and young child feeding, growth during infancy and early childhood, micro- and macronutrient status of infants and young children, maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation, risk factors for early lactation difficulties, and the short- and long-term consequences of interventions to improve nutrition of mothers and their children. She has conducted clinical and community-based research in Bangladesh, Costa Rica, Ghana, Guatemala, Honduras, Malawi, Mexico, Peru, and the United States. Her professional service includes consultation for the World Health Organization, United Nations Children’s Fund, Pan American Health Organization, National Institutes of Health, and the March of Dimes, scientific advisory committees for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the UK Medical Research Council, and serving as President of the Society for International Nutrition Research and of the International Society for Research on Human Milk and Lactation. She has a Ph.D. in biological sciences from the University of Michigan.

Gordon Guyatt, M.Sc., M.D., is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, and one of the founders of evidence-based medicine. He has played a key role in more than 30 major clinical studies (including both large-scale observational and randomized controlled trials) and has extensive expertise in study methodology. As co-founder and co-chair of the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) working group he has been intimately involved in the development and evolution of the GRADE approach. Dr. Guyatt’s research interests include the dissemination of concepts of evidence-based medicine to health workers and health care consumers; the methodology of clinical practice guidelines and medical decision making; systematic review methodology; and ascertaining patients’ values and preferences. Dr. Guyatt has published more than 1,000 peer-reviewed papers that have been cited more than 95,000 times. Dr. Guyatt has been a leading exponent of evidence-based approaches to clinical practice, having coined the term “evidence-based medicine” in 1990. He has an M.S. and an M.D. from McMaster University.

Janet C. King, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist of the Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute and Professor Emeritus of Nutrition at the University of California, Berkeley, and Davis. Throughout a long and distinguished career, Dr. King has made substantive contributions to the body of human

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×

nutrition research, application, and policy development. In recognition of her national and international reputation, she was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 1994, and in 2007, she was inducted into the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research Hall of Fame. She directed the USDA Western Human Nutrition Research Center at the University of California, Davis (1995-2002) and chaired the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of California, Berkeley (1988-1994). Dr. King’s research focuses on metabolic adjustments to changes in nutrient intakes in humans; she is especially interested in metabolism and nutrient utilization of pregnant and lactating women and cellular and whole body zinc functions. Dr. King’s impact on the field of human nutrition extends well beyond her research accomplishments. For example, she chaired the USDA/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. When Dr. King was the Chair of the National Academies of Sciences Food and Nutrition Board in 1994, a new paradigm for the Dietary Reference Intakes was established. She recently chaired a United Nations University, Food and Agriculture Organization, World Health Organization Joint Committee on Dietary Harmonization and currently serves as Director of the United Nations International Consultative Group on Zinc. Dr. King has published more than 250 scientific papers, review articles, and book chapters. She has trained more than 65 graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and visiting scientists.

Marian L. Neuhouser, Ph.D., R.D., is Full Member in the Cancer Prevention Program, Division of Public Health Sciences at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. She is also Core Faculty in Nutritional Sciences and Affiliate Professor of Epidemiology, both in the School of Public Health, University of Washington. Dr. Neuhouser is a nutritional epidemiologist whose primary research focus is nutrition and energy balance and their relationship to cancer prevention and cancer survivorship. She has broad experience and leadership in large clinical trials, including the Women’s Health Initiative and the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, small-scale controlled dietary interventions, and large observational cohorts. In addition, a portion of Dr. Neuhouser’s research portfolio is focused on methods to improve diet and physical activity assessment and numerous aspects of health disparities, which links together nutrition, energy balance and cancer risk. Dr. Neuhouser was a member of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee and served as Vice-President of the American Society for Nutrition (2015-2016), after which she became President (2016-2017).

Ross L. Prentice, Ph.D., is Member and former Director of the Public Health Sciences Division at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×

and Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Washington. His research focuses on chronic disease population science and disease prevention, and on related methodology developments. His statistical research areas include failure time data analysis methods; cohort study design and analysis methods; the use of biomarkers to address measurement error issues, especially in diet and physical activity epidemiology; surrogate outcome methods and limitations; and genomic and proteomic methods. He has served as Principal Investigator (PI) of the Clinical Coordinating Center for the Women’s Health Initiative from its inception in 1992 to 2011 (dual PI 2008-2011), which involves a multifaceted randomized controlled trial and cohort study among 161,000 postmenopausal U.S. women. The results of the trial have markedly changed clinical practice in the use of postmenopausal hormones. Dr. Prentice has received the COPSS Award and the Fisher Lecture Award from the “Joint Statistical Societies,” the Research Excellence in Epidemiology and Prevention Award from the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and American Cancer Society, and the AACR Team Science Award. He is also a member (1990) of the National Academy of Medicine.

Joseph Rodricks, Ph.D., is a Founding Principal of Ramboll Environ. An expert in toxicology and risk analysis, Dr. Rodricks has consulted for hundreds of manufacturers and government agencies and for the World Health Organization in the evaluation of health risks associated with human exposure to chemical substances of all types. Before Environ, Dr. Rodricks served 15 years as a scientist at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; in his last 4 years, he served as Associate Commissioner for Health Affairs. His experience extends from pharmaceuticals, medical devices, consumer products and foods, to occupational chemicals and environmental contaminants. He has served on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and on 30 boards and committees of the National Academies, including the committees that produced the seminal works Risk Assessment in the Federal Government: Managing the Process (1983) and Science and Decisions: Advancing Risk Assessment (2009). Dr. Rodricks also served for 7 years on the Institute of Medicine Subcommittee on Upper Reference Levels of Nutrients. Dr. Rodricks has nearly 150 scientific publications and has received honorary awards from three professional societies for his contributions to toxicology and risk analysis. Dr. Rodricks earned his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Maryland, College Park, and was a postdoctoral scholar at University of California, Berkeley.

Patrick J. Stover, Ph.D., is Professor and Director of the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University. He is also director of the World

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×

Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Implementation Research in Nutrition and Global Policy at Cornell University, and Past-President of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences. Dr. Stover’s research interests focus on the biochemical, genetic, and epigenetic mechanisms that underlie the relationships between folic acid and human pathologies, including neural tube defects and other developmental anomalies, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Specific interests include the regulation of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism and cellular methylation reactions, molecular basis of the fetal origins hypothesis, development of mouse models to elucidate mechanisms of folate-related pathologies, and nuclear one-carbon metabolism. In 2016, he was elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and in 2014 was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2014, he received the State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities, the Osborne and Mendel Award for outstanding recent basic research accomplishments in nutrition from the American Society for Nutrition, and a MERIT award from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. In 1996, he received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on outstanding scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers. He has been selected as an Outstanding Educator four times by Cornell Merrill Presidential Scholars. Dr. Stover served two terms on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) and he served on the FNB Nutrigenomics Workshop Planning Group. Dr. Stover received his Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biophysics from the Medical College of Virginia.

Katherine L. Tucker, Ph.D., is Professor of Nutritional Epidemiology in the Department of Biomedical and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. She holds adjunct appointments at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. Dr. Tucker has contributed to more than 300 articles in scientific journals. Her research focuses on dietary intake and risk of chronic disease, including osteoporosis, cognitive decline, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease. She is the Director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-funded Center on Population Health and Health Disparities, studying the roles of diet, health behavior, stress, and genetic predisposition in relation to chronic conditions in Puerto Rican adults. She currently serves as a scientific adviser for, and leads a Vanguard data analysis center with, the Jackson Heart Study. She is the Editor in Chief of Advances in Nutrition, the international review journal of the American Society of Nutrition (ASN), and was a co-editor of the 11th edition of the textbook Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×

Dr. Tucker is currently a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board and previously served on Institute of Medicine committees to review the Child and Adult Care Food Program meal requirements and the implications of dioxin in the food supply. Dr. Tucker received her Ph.D. in nutritional sciences from Cornell University.

Robert B. Wallace, M.D., M.Sc., is the Irene Ensminger Stecher professor of epidemiology and internal medicine at the University of Iowa Colleges of Public Health and Medicine. He has a variety of public health experiences. He was an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He has conducted many population health studies as well as clinical trials, focusing on the prevention and control of chronic illnesses and other disabling conditions of older persons. These have included neurological conditions, fracture, cancers, coronary disease, mental illnesses, and the health of older women. He has continuing experience with community interventions related to the prevention of falls and motor vehicle injuries in older persons. He was a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, and the National Advisory Council on Aging of the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and has been a past chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Population Health and Board on the Health of Select Populations, and he has had substantial experience with National Academies studies and panels. He is currently involved in several actively funded research projects by NIH, including several related to nutritional issues. He received his M.S. in epidemiology from the State University of New York at Buffalo and his M.D. from the Northwestern University School of Medicine.

Weihsueh A. Chiu, Ph.D. (consultant to the committee), is a professor in the Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M University. Before joining the university, he worked at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for more than 14 years, most recently as chief of the Toxicity Pathways Branch in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Division of the National Center for Environmental Assessment. His research has focused on human health risk assessment, particularly with respect to toxicokinetics, mechanisms of toxicity, physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling, dose-response assessment, and characterizing uncertainty and variability. Dr. Chiu led the development of EPA’s 2011 IRIS assessment of trichloroethylene, which pioneered the use of probabilistic methods for characterizing uncertainty and variability in toxicokinetics and dose

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×

response. He is currently Chair-elect of the Dose-Response Specialty Group of the Society for Risk Analysis. He has served on several National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committees, including the Committee on Predictive-Toxicology Approaches for Military Assessments of Acute Exposures and the Committee on Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity. Dr. Chiu received a Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×
Page 312
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×
Page 313
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×
Page 314
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×
Page 315
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×
Page 316
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×
Page 317
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes Based on Chronic Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24828.
×
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Since 1938 and 1941, nutrient intake recommendations have been issued to the public in Canada and the United States, respectively. Currently defined as the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs), these values are a set of standards established by consensus committees under the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and used for planning and assessing diets of apparently healthy individuals and groups.

In 2015, a multidisciplinary working group sponsored by the Canadian and U.S. government DRI steering committees convened to identify key scientific challenges encountered in the use of chronic disease endpoints to establish DRI values. Their report, Options for Basing Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) on Chronic Disease: Report from a Joint US-/Canadian-Sponsored Working Group, outlined and proposed ways to address conceptual and methodological challenges related to the work of future DRI Committees. This report assesses the options presented in the previous report and determines guiding principles for including chronic disease endpoints for food substances that will be used by future National Academies committees in establishing DRIs.

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